kanarinka akanarinak
Since the beginning
kanarinka@ikatun.com
Works in Waltham, Massachusetts United States of America

PORTFOLIO (2)
BIO
kanarinka, a.k.a. Catherine D’Ignazio, is an artist and educator. Her artwork is participatory and distributed – a single project might take place online, in the street and in a gallery, and involve multiple audiences participating in different ways for different reasons. Her practice is collaborative even when she says it’s not. Her artwork has been exhibited at the ICA Boston, Eyebeam, MASSMoCA, and the Western Front among other locations.

www.kanarinka.com
Discussions (67) Opportunities (7) Events (11) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

architects go broadband


whether you love or hate flash you will appreciate this ;)

http://www.spacehijackers.co.uk/architects/index.html

------------------------------

Dear Space Hijackers, Can I say first of all that I have been an admirer
of your work for many years now, and it is because of my boundless love
for your architectural work that I am proud to be in the position that I
am now in. I am writing to commission you to build five of the largest
and most extravagant buildings yet known to mankind. There will be
unlimited funds, and we are going to bulldoze a large part of central
London to make way for whatever you decide you would like to make.
Please get in contact so that we can arrange a meeting to discuss the
project further.

DISCUSSION

interview with Giselle Bieguelman


Interview with Giselle Bieguelman
by kanarinka

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
background

from Bieguelman's website www.desvirtual.com:
Giselle Beiguelman is a new media artist and multimedia essayist who teaches Digital Culture at the Graduation Program in Communication and Semiotics of PUC-SP (Sao Paulo, Brazil). Her work includes the award-winning "The Book after the Book" (1999) "Content = No Cache" (2000), nominated for the Trace/ Alt-X New Media Competition, and "Recycled" (2001).

kanarinka: I became interested in Giselle Bieguelman's work after reading about her project poetrica [http://www.poetrica.net/] in which people from around the world send messages via the web, SMS, and WAP to be displayed on large advertising billboards in Sao Paulo. My questions to Bieguelman center around the fascinating way her projects break down fixed notions of space (such as public private real virtual) and her projects' connections to everyday activities like reading, writing, and travelling through your daily environment (which for many of us is urban and saturated with advertising messages).

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
interview

kanarinka: It looks like you began working with the internet first as a poet and that you have recently moved into creating large-scale public installations where people submit text messages via the internet for
display in public places. Could you describe how/why you shifted from
net.based poetry to net. based public installation?

Bieguelman: I don

DISCUSSION

Call to Artists and other Regular People


[apologies for cross postings]

hello rhizome,

Please contribute to my new project: "public alley 818, Boston, MA, USA"
- http://www.ikatun.com/k/publicalley818/

"public alley 818" is an urban intervention (It intervenes right into an
alley near my house). Recently I have begun exploring questions of
potentiality, play and public space through the creation of
Fluxus/Ono-like scores. In this project, I would like you to contribute
the instruction pieces and I will carry (some of) them out in public
alley 818 in Boston.

I would like to invite you all to take a moment to dream up an
instruction piece for public alley 818 in Boston, MA, USA.

Here's how it works:

1) You submit an instruction piece here:
http://www.ikatun.com/k/publicalley818/submit.php

2) All instruction pieces are published in the Gallery of Instructions
here: http://www.ikatun.com/k/publicalley818/submitted.php

3) Then I choose which pieces to enact (and how many different versions
to enact) and those go in the Gallery of Enactments:
http://www.ikatun.com/k/publicalley818/gallery.php

Thanks in advance for your participation/collaboration!

best wishes,
kanarinka

ps: please report any bugs to me!

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Fwd: <nettime> ars lecture on software / art /


I'm saying that there is no such duty -- it was primarily in reaction to
the comment that Software Art "has to address the specifics of software"
-- I find that to be a very limiting, modernist, formalist approach to
creating art in any medium. As far as thematic "shoulds" I don't think
there is any such thing for any medium. I am more interested in seeing
software art engage with the world outside of software to see what it
can bring to bear in that sphere.

best,
kanarinka

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-list@rhizome.org [mailto:owner-list@rhizome.org] On Behalf
Of metaphorz
Sent: Monday, September 29, 2003 1:09 PM
To: list@rhizome.org
Subject: RHIZOME_RAW: Re: Re: Fwd: <nettime> ars lecture on software /
art /

Kanarinka wrote:

>
> "The gist of my argument today is that the cultural topology of this
> software 'environment' is articulated by art projects. I'm not saying
> that all art with digital media has to address the specifics of
> software, but I think that Software Art should."
>
> I beg to differ with this for a different reason - namely, the idea
> that the *duty* of art (in whatever genre - painting, video, software,
> etc.)
> is to address the (social/cultural/political/economic) context in
> which
> it is created.

I need to make sure I am understanding your point. Are you saying that
you think that there is a specific anti-formalist duty of art, or are
you rejecting this stated "duty" ? Of course, there is no such duty.

-pf

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DISCUSSION

Re: Fwd: <nettime> ars lecture on software / art /


The gist of my argument today is that the cultural topology of this
software 'environment' is articulated by art projects. I'm not saying
that all art with digital media has to address the specifics of
software, but I think that Software Art should."

I beg to differ with this for a different reason - namely, the idea that
the *duty* of art (in whatever genre - painting, video, software, etc.)
is to address the (social/cultural/political/economic) context in which
it is created.

This is an important area for art in any medium to address - one could
say that the whole modernist project was about addressing, questioning
and criticizing these questions. Software art, being a little newer than
painting and much less accessible to those that do not code, has a
critical responsibility to this end. However, to limit software art to
discussing the context of software only is very narrow given that there
is a world outside of the production and distribution of software.
(Should painting only address the specifics of painting or photography
only those of photography? This leads to speaking to specialists about
specialist history of specialist genres).

In my opinion it is much more interesting to investigate how software
can intersect with other genres, with physical space, with ways to
provoke (general) audiences to participation/engagement, with themes
that might not be related to geek/nerd/open-source/etc. communities (not
to dis on these here - i'm a coder that aspires towards geekdom - only
that it seems to me that there is a fetishization of the "geek" in the
software art world -- e.g. whoever's got the baddest skillset wins ). I
think it is reasonable and entirely necessary to ask software art to
open up its area of criticality and engage not only with the context of
software but with the world at large - the software and tools are ready,
the humans need to catch up.

best,
kanarinka

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-list@rhizome.org [mailto:owner-list@rhizome.org] On Behalf
Of Jim Andrews
Sent: Friday, September 26, 2003 6:46 AM
To: list@rhizome.org
Subject: Re: RHIZOME_RAW: Fwd: <nettime> ars lecture on software / art /

"The gist of my argument today is that the cultural topology of this
software 'environment' is articulated by art projects. I'm not saying
that all art with digital media has to address the specifics of
software, but I think that Software Art should."

There isn't much software art that can begin to compare with Napster in
articulating the cultural topology of the software environment. Napster
went beyond articulating it to shaping it. This is a possibility for
software art that is rarely considered: that software art can not solely
articulate but shape culture and its software.

The most original programmers in the world define software art by their
creations.

Part of the excitement of software art is that a lot of it happens
outside the art world; software art cannot easily be contained therein,
precisely because it is a practice relevant much more widely than to
matters of art. The art of programming comprehends Knuth's approach but
also involves the engineering of experience. And, as you say, awareness
of the social context.

You say

"I believe that we need a strong notion of what constitutes art, and we
must argue about that, but it would help immensely if we could agree on
drawing a bottom line which excludes some attempts. For me, and again I
put this up for discussion, art is about the transgression of
boundaries, about making familiar experiences strange, about dramatising
what pretends to be innocent, and about exploring the virtualities, the
potentialities of technologies and human relationships."

The stronger the notion of what constitutes art, the more it will miss.
It is, I suppose, the job of critics to define it and artists to
confound their definitions via works that escape categorization and open
into fresh experience/perception/realization of what art can be.

ja
http://vispo.com

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