Justin Simoni
Since the beginning
Works in Denver, Colorado United States of America

PORTFOLIO (4)
BIO
Justin Simoni is currently defending his spot as one of the most talented and hardest working individuals at the celebrated, Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design (RMCAD) located in Denver Colorado.

Receiver of the 2004 Steele Family Award for Creativity and Innovation, as well as the Gold Award in the mixed/computer/alternative category, Simoni mixed computer programming, oil paint and digital film process movies in a wide variety of interesting and unique ways to create a completely rich and awe-inspiring experience.

Simoni's talent spans both written fiction, traditional painting materials and techniques and experimental uses of computer technology and programming.

It's this duality of left brain/right brain cooperation that allows Simoni to forge such powerful pieces.

Justin Simoni has shown in Denver at the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver (MCART), The Pirate Gallery Alternative space and Andenken Gallery.

Simoni currently maintains and runs:

http://skazat.com

http://prolix.nu

http://justinsimoni.com

Discussions (9) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: strict chapters, spagetti poedry


> There's one more recipes for watercolor

To let you know, the first one wasn't mine; it's from a friend named Harry
S. Walters. Interesting guy. Interesting painting.

> Your work are very laud(as your words).Unfortunately for
> you.

.. Not really following you, which work? I think it's OK to like things. My
g/f thinks I'm too critical.

> Unfortunately for
> you.

Again, not following you, but list: do all conversations on this list end in
name calling? Is that why there really aren't any threads? There seems to be
some intelligent people on this list, and a few egos. Is there a better list
for this type of discussion?

Critical examination is fine, but talk is cheap without some back up.

Cheers,

Justin Simoni | http://justinsimoni.com | 720 436 7701

- Starving artist by day,
- Poetic philosopher by night
- Computer programmer in the wee hours.

On 12/30/03 12:28 PM, "manik" <manik@ptt.yu> wrote:

>
>> Crack watercolor ice cubes onto the canvas; wait till they melt and
>> make
>> pretty designs. There you go: a non-determinant painting, given a set
>> of
>> rules that can be adjusted (for example, temp of the room), just like
>> any
>> little Flash animation toy.
>
> Cool!
>
> There's one more recipes for watercolor;don't eat two days,drink 4 liter
> water a day,eat different acrylic color.
> Pies on paper
> Shit on canvas.
> Dear Justin,after that you(mmmaybe?!?) could be sort of creative person.
> What do you think?Your work are very laud(as your words).Unfortunately for
> you.
> MANIK
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Rob Myers" <robmyers@mac.com>
> To: <list@rhizome.org>
> Sent: Monday, December 29, 2003 9:35 PM
> Subject: Re: RHIZOME_RAW: strict chapters, spagetti poedry
>
>
>> On 29 Dec 2003, at 07:31, Justin Simoni wrote:
>>
>>>> OOP as in novel-length projects; a methodology for making a code
>>>> project
>>>> manageable when it gets big. like chapters and paragraphs and so on,
>>>
>>> I don't think you're analogy is entirely correct. OOP is used to cut a
>>> project into "objects" (thus the name), which can then be combined in
>>> different ways, be inherited, and all that cal. I would say that this
>>> is
>>> very similar to any sort of note-taking during the novel writing phase.
>>
>> Objects are also called "actors" in some methodologies and views. You
>> can model conventional narrative very simply as an OO system. Indeed
>> modern computer games are based on this assumption.
>>
>>> For instance, I have index card for the "Bad Guys", which are like
>>> a,b,c.
>>
>> This is very much like the CRC Cards used in OOP.
>>
>>> You'd be better comparing how OOP is to procedural programming as
>>> traditional writing is to nonlinear writing.
>>
>> There's work done on computational narrative, including a Prolog
>> grammar for simple narrative. There's even been conferences, but I
>> don't have the URLs to hand.
>> Propp's "Morphology Of The Folktale" is an unintentional classic in
>> computational narrative.
>>
>> Bear in mind that procedural/functional/logical programming can all
>> write the same programs, they just supposedly make tackling some
>> classes of problems more or less easy. It's *NOT* like translating a
>> novel from French to English, there are no untranslatable concepts
>> lurking in the text.
>>
>> That said, a functional/procedural/object plot structure or descriptive
>> technique could be interesting, at least as a thought experiment.
>>
>>>> how do you update the novel form?
>>>
>>> Wasn't the novel, "novel" once?
>>
>> I'd be more interested in updating the novel content. Form will follow
>> (see the 1960s "New Wave" of SF, especially Michael Moorcock's "Jerry
>> Cornelius" short stories).
>>
>>>> it wouldn't be what it is without its history, but the very history
>>>> prevents
>>>> it from being recast into what you want to create next.
>>>
>>> You could probably say the same thing about painting and you'd
>>> probably be
>>> wrong.
>>
>> Indeed. Ignorance is bliss for the producer but not the consumer.
>> Uninformed production tends to provincialism. Refusal requires that you
>> know what you're refusing, and rebellion requires that you know what
>> you're rebelling against. Etc.
>>
>>> Crack watercolor ice cubes onto the canvas; wait till they melt and
>>> make
>>> pretty designs. There you go: a non-determinant painting, given a set
>>> of
>>> rules that can be adjusted (for example, temp of the room), just like
>>> any
>>> little Flash animation toy.
>>
>> Cool!
>>
>>> So what's your point? No more interesting poems? Poop.
>>> If you say nothing is left to be done with something, something new
>>> will be
>>> done with it; just like your weeds.
>>
>> The idea that everything has been done has been done. It requires an
>> extraordinary presumption of ultimacy on the part of one's taste. The
>> idea of the exhaustion of <insert form here> is a reaction to a
>> specific set of post-Second-World-War conditions that can only now hold
>> as affectation or unconsidered dogma.
>>
>> But it fills essays, as it has for decades.
>>
>> - Rob.
>>
>> +
>> -> post: list@rhizome.org
>> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
>> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
>> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
>> -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
>> +
>> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
>> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
>>
>>
>
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
>

DISCUSSION

Re: strict chapters, spagetti poedry


> OOP as in novel-length projects; a methodology for making a code project
> manageable when it gets big. like chapters and paragraphs and so on,

I don't think you're analogy is entirely correct. OOP is used to cut a
project into "objects" (thus the name), which can then be combined in
different ways, be inherited, and all that cal. I would say that this is
very similar to any sort of note-taking during the novel writing phase.

For instance, I have index card for the "Bad Guys", which are like a,b,c.
One of these bad guys is named, "Bill", (who has his own index card, in my
"Bad Guys pile) he has characteristic x,y,z, he's just like the bad guys,
but instead of a, he shows, n characteristic - which catalysts my entire
story. Bill knows, "Jane", which is one of the "Good guys"... I don't want
to stretch this too far... But Chapters are much like separate files in a
program, if anything, although there most likely isn't a "direction" in the
files of a program.

You'd be better comparing how OOP is to procedural programming as
traditional writing is to nonlinear writing.

> how do you update the novel form?

Wasn't the novel, "novel" once?

> it wouldn't be what it is without its history, but the very history prevents
> it from being recast into what you want to create next.

You could probably say the same thing about painting and you'd probably be
wrong.

This:

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/ingres/ingres.source.jpg

And

this:

http://artistsregister.com/artists/CO1419

Are basically the same medium, used completely differently. I believe the
second has a lineage to the first... if just the materials itself, but the
"recast" seems fairly complete.

I see your somewhat point, but history also strengthens.

> "Poetry can no longer be remade." (the lettrist Isou from the forties)

Any Kerouac book published in the 50's. On The Road was seriously spinning
the heads of the mainstream, I would say that spontaneous prose remade the
novel form, if not the poetic form.

> People will go on remaking poetry like they continue to paint watercolors.
> It is a pleasant activity of the garden variety that harms no one. Let a
> thousand dandelions bloom.

I've seen some pretty interesting things done with watercolors.

Mix watercolors with water (obviously) and pour them into ice cube
containers. Put them in the freezer until frozen.

Stretch a canvas.

Crack watercolor ice cubes onto the canvas; wait till they melt and make
pretty designs. There you go: a non-determinant painting, given a set of
rules that can be adjusted (for example, temp of the room), just like any
little Flash animation toy.

You can also mix watercolors with cheapo acrylics and get better acrylics -
it's usually cheaper than using expensive acrylics.

So what's your point? No more interesting poems? Poop.

If you say nothing is left to be done with something, something new will be
done with it; just like your weeds.

Justin Simoni
--
Playing around with life TWICE as hard, so you don't have to.

http://skazat.com - meta sketchbook
http://prolix.nu - art for your computer
http://justinsimoni.com - the portfolio of playing.

Each one of us, in his timidity, has a limit beyond which he is outraged. It
is inevitable that he who by concentrated application has extended this
limit for himself, should arouse the resentment of those who have accepted
conventions which, since accepted by all, require no initiative of
application. And this resentment generally takes the form of meaningless
laughter or of criticism, if not persecution. But this apparent violation is
preferable to the monstrous habits condoned by etiquette and estheticism.

- MAN RAY

On 12/28/03 10:26 PM, "Jim Andrews" <jim@vispo.com> wrote:

> writing a machine
>
> "a poem is a machine made out of words."
> william carlos williams
>
> spagetti poedry.
>
> handler/method paragraphs.
>
> "Remarkably, sequence, selection, and iteration are sufficient for
> constructing any algorithm. If it is possible to construct an algorithm for
> describing a particular process, then the algorithm can be constructed from
> sequence, selection, and iteration alone."
>
> OOP as in novel-length projects; a methodology for making a code project
> manageable when it gets big. like chapters and paragraphs and so on, only um
> strict. strict chapters. the 'do me strict' chapter.
>
> but OOP is also for when it needs constant modification. like a methodology
> for legislative systems? or an ongoing art form that is capable of
> describing our experience. how do you update the novel form? people do it
> all the time. but there comes a time when you just can't remake it anymore.
> it wouldn't be what it is without its history, but the very history prevents
> it from being recast into what you want to create next.
>
> "Poetry can no longer be remade." (the lettrist Isou from the forties)
>
> People will go on remaking poetry like they continue to paint watercolors.
> It is a pleasant activity of the garden variety that harms no one. Let a
> thousand dandelions bloom.
>
> People are afraid of what they don't understand.
>
> Art is, in part, what is made of unknowing.
>
> fest of the bestive to all rhizomers!
>
> ja
>
>
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
>

DISCUSSION

Re: GIGO from http://www.playdamage.org/market-o-matic/


> The vortex creates, the chaos profligates. [...]

That was a sh*t load of a buzzwords, I really got tired of that when I
studying and later failed under the teaching of Mark Amerika there - I just
think it's only use is to confuse (but I guess it's cool to do... (or
perhaps you're making fun of all that)). There's a good quote:

---
Hear Peter Halley at the College Art Association conference, scolding
academics for the jargon-laden obscurantism of critical prose, although his
own writings on behalf of Baudrillard and the simulacrum thickened the stew
more than a little.

- Marcia E. Vetrocq
---

but I'll give you one more: Synchronicity.

* I was watching your, "I know that guy" video, which is about the chance
coincidence of someone you knew ten years ago on Times Square. At the same
time, I was listening to the Breeders, "Cannonball". As soon as "I know you"
was typed on the screen, "I know you" was sung by Kim Deal. Like, exactly in
sync. Woo.

* My gf also just emailed me about her first time at Times Square today.
Wooooo.

* I then looked at your bio, and saw that the most recent "Legacy Work" you
have listed is one at Cordell Taylor - which I was at not seven days ago.
Woooooo.

* This would all be less creepy if I wasn't reading this book:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1569245991

Today.

So I'm thoroughly creeped out and am getting food. If I see you at Wild
Oats, I'm seriously going to freak out.

--
Justin Simoni
Playing around with life TWICE as hard, so you don't have to.

http://skazat.com - meta sketchbook
http://prolix.nu - art for your computer
http://justinsimoni.com - the portfolio of playing.

On 12/27/03 8:41 PM, "atomic elroy" <atomic@pcisys.net> wrote:

> http://www.atomicelroy.com
> http://www.atomicelroy.com
> http://www.atomicelroy.com
> http://www.atomicelroy.com
>
>
> Work of Proto-Art in the Age of Artificial Reproduction
>
> The vortex creates, the chaos profligates. In the synaptic hallucination, art
> objects are calculations of the musings of the vortex -- a vortex that uses
> the chaos as a zeitgeist to enmesh ideas, patterns, and emotions. With the
> evolution of the electronic environment, the vortex is superseding a point
> where it will be free from the chaos to transcend immersions into the
> machinations of the delphic hallucination. Work of Proto-Art in the Age of
> Artificial Reproduction contains 10 minimal quicktime engines (also refered to
> as "soundtoys") that enable the user to make buxom audio/visual compositions.
>
> measuring chains, constructing realities
> putting into place forms
> a matrix of illusion and disillusion
> a strange attracting force
> so that a seduced reality will be able to spontaneously feed on it
>
>
> atomic elroy's work investigates the nuances of pixels through the use of
> stopframe motion and close-ups which emphasize the Artificial nature of
> digital media. elroy explores abstract and stupid scenery as motifs to
> describe the idea of infinite hallucination. Using fresh loops, cathode rays,
> and neo-fascist images as patterns, elroy creates meditative environments
> which suggest the expansion of art...
>
> <-- Obligatory ascii sig. Repeat until desired cyborg effect is achieved. -->
>
> /u[0]{)]|]]-] -------------/u/u!@#$%^~!@#$%^&*())
> __++_)(*&^%$--------/u/u!@#$%^~!@#$ %^&*())__++_)(*&^%$--------/u/u!@#$
> %^~!@#$%^&*())__+, etc., etc.
>
> <-- End obligatory ascii sig. -->
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
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> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
>

DISCUSSION

Perl program as Art Object ala Duchamp's Fountain


I emailed this for Net Art News, but I guess it wasn't picked up. But here's
some absurdity your way:

http://mojo.skazat.com/project/press_release_12_01_03.html

(and posted below)

Cheers,

Justin Simoni | http://justinsimoni.com | 720 436 7701

- Starving artist by day,
- Poetic philosopher by night
- Computer programmer in the wee hours.

Justin Simoni Announces New Name For Mailing List Manager, Turns
Programming Project into Art

Denver, CO - 12/01/03 - Justin Simoni announced today the immediate
release of Dada Mail, (formerly Mojo Mail). Justin states, "I have had
to change the name of my celebrated program due to legal issues with
Mediaplex Inc. which holds the trademark for MOJO Mail."

He continues, "Not that I'm real happy about the name change at all.
This particular program came out initially in December of 1999, with its
first stable release in January of 2000. I'm having a really hard time
understanding why it took Mediaplex Inc. more than three years to get in
contact with me."

According to the United States Patent and Trademark Office's website (
http://tarr.uspto.gov/servlet/tarr?regser=serial&entryv154709 ), the
"MOJO MAIL" mark was registered to Mediaplex Inc. on November 12th,
2002.

"This is obviously big guy versus little guy and this particular David
doesn't see much reason in pursuing the matter in the legal system."
Instead, Justin has complied with Mediaplex's demands to change the name
of his program. "The decision to comply was simple: Mediaplex has
lawyers, I sleep on a borrowed couch in a basement apartment. It's a red
velvet couch - but still."

More importantly, Justin has also officially turned Dada Mail into an
Art Object, much like the original Readymades of Marcel Duchamp - one of
the founders of the Dada anti-art movement of the early 20th Century.
"Dada Mail" itself is a nod to this original art movement and an
example that a Readymade can still have relevance as long as the object
has conceptual ground to stand on.

"From this day forth, Dada Mail will be the title of an Art Object, not
the name of a computer program. You cannot, as far as I know, Trademark
the title of a piece of Art. I have credentials as an artist and
absolutely none as a businessman or a software engineer. I was an
eighteen-year-old punk kid with green hair when I started working on
this project. If I've learned anything since then, it's that you can
accomplish whatever you try. I'm changing the definition of something
that seemed to be fairly obvious. I hope it at least makes people think.
I can't believe more people haven't done the same in light of recent
Trademark and Patent disputes in the industry."

"Maybe they will."

Dada Mail is Free Software released under the GNU Public License.

Justin currently attends the Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design in
Denver as a Junior in their Painting and Drawing Bachelors program. A
self-appointed Renaissance man, he strives to be able to make anything
out of anything.

Press Contact: Justin Simoni (720) 436 7701 contact@justinsimoni.com

NOTE TO EDITORS: For additional information visit the Dada Mail project
website ( http://skazat.com/dadaproject ) and Justin Simoni's Portfolio
website ( http://justinsimoni.com )

Mediaplex and MOJO Mail are either registered trademarks or trademarks
of Mediaplex Inc.