joy garnett
Since the beginning
Works in United States of America

PORTFOLIO (1)
BIO
Joy Garnett is a painter based in New York. She appropriates news images from the Internet and re-invents them as paintings. Her subject is the apocalyptic-sublime landscape, as well as the digital image itself as cultural artifact in an increasingly technologized world. Her image research has resulted in online documentation projects, most notably The Bomb Project.

Notable past exhibitions include her recent solo shows at Winkleman Gallery, New York and at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC; group exhibitions organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, P.S.1/MoMA Contemporary Art Center, Artists Space, White Columns (New York), Kettle's Yard, Cambridge (UK), and De Witte Zaal, Ghent (Belgium). She shows with aeroplastics contemporary, Brussels, Belgium.

extended network >

homepage:
http://joygarnett.com

The Bomb Project
http://www.thebombproject.org

First Pulse Projects
http://firstpulseprojects.net

NEWSgrist - where spin is art
http://newsgrist.typepad.com/

Discussions (685) Opportunities (5) Events (8) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: re: that day


> How does that make any one individual's suffering worth less than
> another's?

that's really the whole thing. what really matters is understanding this.

best,
J

DISCUSSION

Re: re: that day


tim raised a point with me recently off-list, which I think is important
to repeat: some of our reactions seem "shameful" and people are either
loathe to acknowledge them or to discuss them. However, some of us may
agree that it's important to get beyond received moral judgements about
what people should or shouldn't feel when faced with such a situation--
instead it's important--essential--to examine how we actually *do* feel
and to analyse the situation, our behaviours, etc. how else to approach a
critical way of thinking/dealing with this? how else to allow empathy to
flow into action?

It's important to deal with the full spectrum of responses here, and to
refrain from moralizing judgements-- they only serve to inhibit, and to
produce more shame.

JG

On Thu, 11 Jul 2002, Seth Thompson wrote:

> I find this whole conversation troubling. Maybe some people on this
> list need to get off their computer every once in a while and
> volunteer at a soup kitchen, homeless shelter, or psychiatric center
> to name just a few. NYC offers diverse experiences. If you think
> that New York is full of "cotton-fluff" you need to go to the places
> in the city where "you're not supposed to go," "middle class" New
> Yorkers. Volunteering in some of the places I listed above can show
> you that life's "difficulties" do not necessarily come in one blast
> but rather can last over a lifetime.
>
> It seems as though sensitivity is only a result of what has happened
> to oneself rather than being empathetic to others. I hope that this
> can change. I think its awful that people have felt that they have
> found a sense of community due to disaster. I hope one day that some
> people will realize that there was community all the time--all one
> had to do was reach out.
>
> Seth Thompson
>
>
>
>
> >>hey joy,
> >>
> >>seems like ivan was saying something else. didn't read like he
> >>actually thought YOU had glossed over the real horrors of being
> >>bombed. rather that in the US (esp in such a big US city), the
> >>average person still has the "luxury" of intellectually separating
> >>the traumatic from an appreciation for the experience itself. What
> >>PERCENTAGE of the population here was tangibly more effected than
> >>folks in paris?
> >
> >i would say a very large percent. we're just speculating, but there
> >are lots of lots of kids in nyc exhibiting symptoms of
> >post-traumatic stress disorder and i would speculate that your
> >average parisian youngster isn't having that problem as a result of
> >9/11.
> >
> >anyway,
> >
> >i would also speculate that joy is grateful for the trauma. even in
> >the rawness of nyc, the 'cotton-fluff' of average middle-class
> >american existence provides it's own special flavor of grinding
> >ennui (i've heard that boredom is the sensation that humans hate the
> >most, we can take pain longer than boredom). 9/11 brutally punctured
> >this fluff, and to those who weren't personally traumatized through
> >injury or death it has given us something we've never had before
> >(however briefly) both good and bad; a sensualist can appreciate
> >both: a true sense of connectedness and community and REAL emotions
> >of horror and outrage.
> >
> >>
> >>If Kabul gets bombed, a larger majority of the people there
> >>wouldn't care how much "realer" their experience was than the news
> >>coverage. To many in the world, this distinction is a triviality,
> >>though maybe you find it fascinating. (esp. if we aren't
> >>completely absorbed in the task of plain surviving the aftermath)
> >
> >our cultures our totally different. i don't see the distinction as
> >trivial at all. the mediation of western culture is one of it's
> >defining characteristics.
> >
> >>
> >>Obviously, the Picasso/Guernica thing is just an illustration that
> >>this first-hand witnessing is hardly a necessity. there is no
> >>benefit to it besides very PERSONAL interest.
> >
> >of course an artist could imagine human suffering.. but if one had
> >NEVER witnessed it, i don't know how powerful that artist's
> >depiction of it would be.
> >
> >>But for most of us NYers, we may have seen something meaningless
> >>out of a window or from a roof-top but
> >>don't be fooled. We are ALL getting the story from "CNN" in some form.
> >
> >that's joy's point: the mediated culture. and she shared her
> >feelings, however horrible it may sound, of gratitude for this
> >particular event not being mediated for her. we can all understand
> >that i think, i know i've had similar feelings. if you stood on a
> >rooftop and watched what happened and it was 'something meaningless'
> >than i'll never know where you find meaning. personally, as a i
> >watched the first tower collapse my little brain was busy making
> >synaptic connections that it never knew it could (we call them
> >horror). i've never felt anything like it. it may sound sick, but
> >i'm glad i had a chance to experience those emotions.
> >
> ><snip>
> >>
> >>judson
> >>
> >>
> >>>You distort my meaning in order to state a truism. Obviously "greatful"
> >>>was not applied to the experience of being bombed; it should be a given,
> >>>especially in this tech savvy community that we in the 1st world foster
> >>>and live through a super-mediated culture in which "reality" and fantasy
> >>>are frequently blurred. that is the reference point for my remarks, it
> >>>should be pretty obvious.
> >>>
> >>>nuff said.
> >>>
> >>>JG
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>On Wed, 10 Jul 2002, Ivan Pope wrote:
> >>>
> >>> >
> >>> > > more on the distance/mediation thing:
> >>> > >
> >>> > > To be fair, I think it was *easier* in some ways for those of us who
> >>> > > actually experienced it to deal with it. it was unreal
> >>>enough as it was --
> >>> > > my friends who happened to be out of town at the time needed
> >>>to get back
> >>> > > in, to see to feel to hear what was going on without the
> >>>mediation. those
> >>> > > of us who were right downtown watching had more to deal with
> >>>sooner, more
> >>> > > horror if you will, but we had the gift of our own senses, our
> >>> > > insufficient physical and psychological "mediation" or
> >>>self-protective
> >>> > > devices. we didn't have to make that leap from mediated
> >>>horror to register
> >>> > > the reality -- it sounds crazy, but i've felt grateful that
> >>>I had my own
> >>> > > experience of it
> >>> > >
> >>> >
> >>> > I guess its a western luxury to be able to be grateful for the
> >>>experience of
> >>> > being in a city when it is bombed. This is, of course, an experience had
> >>> > counteless times around the world by other individuals. Seldom
> >>>do we hear
> >>> > that they are grateful for the experience. The warring
> >>>factions around Kabul
> >>> > killed 50,000 by raining missiles randomly down on the city. I
> >>>guess most
> >>> > inhabitants weren't grateful and would rather have watched in
> >>>on CNN etc.
> >>> > Only it wasn't on CNN because the world had no interest at all.
> >>> > Picasso made a work about Guernica, the genesis of bombing
> >>>civilians, though
> >>> > he wasn't there to experience it. Maybe he was the CNN of his day :)
> >>> > Sow the wind ...
> >>> > Ivan
> >
> >-
> --
> Seth Thompson
> Wigged Productions
> seththompson@wigged.net
> http://www.wigged.net
>
> *************************************************************
> Evolving Traditions: Artists Working in New Media
> Video Documentary. 2002. (Color, 56:35)
> Directed and produced by Seth Thompson.
>
> Profiles four internationally recognized artists who have
> incorporated current computer technology into their work to enhance
> their artistic visions. Artists addressed are: Mark Amerika,
> Tennessee Rice Dixon, Toni Dove, and Troika Ranch.
>
> http://www.wigged.net/evolvingtraditions/
> *************************************************************
>
> + live.and.on.fire http://e8z.org
> -> Rhizome.org
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php3
>

DISCUSSION

Re: re: that day


You distort my meaning in order to state a truism. Obviously "greatful"
was not applied to the experience of being bombed; it should be a given,
especially in this tech savvy community that we in the 1st world foster
and live through a super-mediated culture in which "reality" and fantasy
are frequently blurred. that is the reference point for my remarks, it
should be pretty obvious.

nuff said.

JG

On Wed, 10 Jul 2002, Ivan Pope wrote:

>
> > more on the distance/mediation thing:
> >
> > To be fair, I think it was *easier* in some ways for those of us who
> > actually experienced it to deal with it. it was unreal enough as it was --
> > my friends who happened to be out of town at the time needed to get back
> > in, to see to feel to hear what was going on without the mediation. those
> > of us who were right downtown watching had more to deal with sooner, more
> > horror if you will, but we had the gift of our own senses, our
> > insufficient physical and psychological "mediation" or self-protective
> > devices. we didn't have to make that leap from mediated horror to register
> > the reality -- it sounds crazy, but i've felt grateful that I had my own
> > experience of it
> >
>
> I guess its a western luxury to be able to be grateful for the experience of
> being in a city when it is bombed. This is, of course, an experience had
> counteless times around the world by other individuals. Seldom do we hear
> that they are grateful for the experience. The warring factions around Kabul
> killed 50,000 by raining missiles randomly down on the city. I guess most
> inhabitants weren't grateful and would rather have watched in on CNN etc.
> Only it wasn't on CNN because the world had no interest at all.
> Picasso made a work about Guernica, the genesis of bombing civilians, though
> he wasn't there to experience it. Maybe he was the CNN of his day :)
> Sow the wind ...
> Ivan
>

DISCUSSION

Re: re: that day


one doesn't have to open the entire can of worms or make disclaimers for
being American or having the 'luxury' to distinguish etc. etc. every
single time one comments on 9/11. sheesh. We already know we live in
disneyland, that's my point. i made a short comment on mediation and the
lack of it -- that whole dynamic is far from understood. ivan already sent
me a note explaining his techiness as preparation/ girding his loins for
the [soon to be highly mediated] anniversary effect we're headed towards
in a matter of months. i think we can probably all agree and say 'blegh'
to that inevitability in unison, eh?

actually, my remarks were originally in regard to eryk's piece, which i
think is worth defending (and now i feel a sort of responsibility toward
it!)

;)

also: i kinda disagree with what you say 'most new yorkers' felt
looking out their windows, though it does have a catchy sound to it. i
just think the range of experiences here are more varied than you
think, despite our disney-ed brains, despite CNN. Or maybe even partially
in response to all that. Once again, Eryk's gut reaction in the TV shop:
'blegh'.

I think it's important to allow for the possibility that as individuals we
employ our own bizarre and quite varied personal filtering devices, even
if we are tuned-in to tv most of the time.

that's what I find really interesting: how we continually have the option
to subvert or flout authoritative mainstream versions of experience. i
think it's amazing and in a way it's unexplored territory, still, despite
all the media theory and scholarship. even we do it--have the potential
to do it. it may be a question of gut response, or of desire, i dunno.

peace,
joy

On Wed, 10 Jul 2002, Plasma Studii wrote:

> hey joy,
>
> seems like ivan was saying something else. didn't read like he
> actually thought YOU had glossed over the real horrors of being
> bombed. rather that in the US (esp in such a big US city), the
> average person still has the "luxury" of intellectually separating
> the traumatic from an appreciation for the experience itself. What
> PERCENTAGE of the population here was tangibly more effected than
> folks in paris?
>
> If Kabul gets bombed, a larger majority of the people there wouldn't
> care how much "realer" their experience was than the news coverage.
> To many in the world, this distinction is a triviality, though maybe
> you find it fascinating. (esp. if we aren't completely absorbed in
> the task of plain surviving the aftermath)
>
> Obviously, the Picasso/Guernica thing is just an illustration that
> this first-hand witnessing is hardly a necessity. there is no
> benefit to it besides very PERSONAL interest. But for most of us
> NYers, we may have seen something meaningless out of a window or from
> a roof-top but don't be fooled. We are ALL getting the story from
> "CNN" in some form.
>
> We may be obsessed with excess but we also have that excess to throw
> around. some place in norway? donated $$ for a choral recital in
> carnegie hall to NY as a response to 9/11. i went as a friend of a
> performer. such is our "relief".
>
> Surely everyone has heard about the shi-shi caterers who went to
> ground zero for the clean-up to serve 5 star lobster bisque. that
> site is a tourist attraction now, complete with gift shopping for
> 9/11 paraphernalia. cash in on american flag sales while you can.
>
> cool though, I think this was our best response. (even if it does
> stink of Nationalism Lite(tm). ) But this stuff just isn't what
> happens in other parts of the world. we live in disneyland. And as
> americans (healthy and proud, with straight white teeth), we are
> really just slave labor for the Magic Kingdom.
>
> judson
>
>
>
> >You distort my meaning in order to state a truism. Obviously "greatful"
> >was not applied to the experience of being bombed; it should be a given,
> >especially in this tech savvy community that we in the 1st world foster
> >and live through a super-mediated culture in which "reality" and fantasy
> >are frequently blurred. that is the reference point for my remarks, it
> >should be pretty obvious.
> >
> >nuff said.
> >
> >JG
> >
> >
> >On Wed, 10 Jul 2002, Ivan Pope wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > > more on the distance/mediation thing:
> > > >
> > > > To be fair, I think it was *easier* in some ways for those of us who
> > > > actually experienced it to deal with it. it was unreal enough
> >as it was --
> > > > my friends who happened to be out of town at the time needed to get back
> > > > in, to see to feel to hear what was going on without the mediation. those
> > > > of us who were right downtown watching had more to deal with sooner, more
> > > > horror if you will, but we had the gift of our own senses, our
> > > > insufficient physical and psychological "mediation" or self-protective
> > > > devices. we didn't have to make that leap from mediated horror
> >to register
> > > > the reality -- it sounds crazy, but i've felt grateful that I had my own
> > > > experience of it
> > > >
> > >
> > > I guess its a western luxury to be able to be grateful for the
> >experience of
> > > being in a city when it is bombed. This is, of course, an experience had
> > > counteless times around the world by other individuals. Seldom do we hear
> > > that they are grateful for the experience. The warring factions
> >around Kabul
> > > killed 50,000 by raining missiles randomly down on the city. I guess most
> > > inhabitants weren't grateful and would rather have watched in on CNN etc.
> > > Only it wasn't on CNN because the world had no interest at all.
> > > Picasso made a work about Guernica, the genesis of bombing
> >civilians, though
> > > he wasn't there to experience it. Maybe he was the CNN of his day :)
> > > Sow the wind ...
> > > Ivan
> > >
> >
> >+ your mama don't dance and your daddy don't rock & roll
> >-> Rhizome.org
> >-> post: list@rhizome.org
> >-> questions: info@rhizome.org
> >-> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> >-> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> >+
> >Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> >Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php3
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
> PLASMA STUDII
> http://plasmastudii.org
> 223 E 10th Street
> PMB 130
> New York, NY 10003
>

DISCUSSION

performance-migration project (fwd)


---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Wed, 10 Jul 2002 19:13:37 -0400
From: tim colins <tcollins@andrew.cmu.edu>
To: ecoart@cgrg.ohio-state.edu
Subject: performance-migration project

BIRD BRAIN UPDATE

"Bird Brain," choreographer Jennifer Monson