Jonah Brucker-Cohen
Since the beginning
Works in Brooklyn, New York United States of America

PORTFOLIO (3)
BIO
Jonah Brucker-Cohen is a researcher, artist, and writer. He received his Ph.D. in the Disruptive Design Team of the Networking and Telecommunications Research Group (NTRG), Trinity College Dublin. He is an adjunct assistant professor of communications in the Media, Culture, Communication dept of NYU Steinhardt School of Culture Education and Human Development and has also taught at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP). From 2001-2004 he was a Research Fellow in the Human Connectedness Group at Media Lab Europe and from 2006-2007 he was an R&D OpenLab Fellow at Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology in New York City. He received his Masters from ITP in 1999 and was an Interval Research Fellow from 1999-2001. His work and thesis focuses on the theme of “Deconstructing Networks” which includes projects that critically challenge and subvert accepted perceptions of network interaction and experience. He is co-founder of the Dublin Art and Technology Association (DATA Group) and a recipient of the ARANEUM Prize sponsored by the Spanish Ministry of Art, Science and Technology and Fundacion ARCO. His writing has appeared in numerous international publications including WIRED Magazine, Make Magazine, Neural, Rhizome.org, Art Asia Pacific, Gizmodo and more, and his work has been presented at events and organizations such as DEAF (03,04), Art Futura (04), SIGGRAPH (00,05), UBICOMP (02,03,04), CHI (04,06) Transmediale (02,04,08), NIME (07), ISEA (02,04,06,09), Institute of Contemporary Art in London (04), Tate Modern (03), Whitney Museum of American Art’s ArtPort (03), Ars Electronica (02,04,08), Chelsea Art Museum, ZKM Museum of Contemporary Art (04-5),Museum of Modern Art (MOMA - NYC)(2008), and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) (2008).

Locative Media Revisited


 

Molly Dilworth, 547 West 27th Street (2009). From the series "Paintings for Satellites."

In the early 2000s, as location-aware devices first became commonplace, there was a lot of hype surrounding their potential creative use by artists. However, over time, this initial enthusiasm for "locative media"--projects that respond to data or communications technologies that refer to particular sites--leveled off, even dissipated. Regardless of this drought, geospatial technologies are widely used, and play an important and often unnoticed role in conditioning many aspects of our existence. Responding to this condition of ubiquity, artists have continued to use locative technologies critically, opening up closed systems, making their effects visible, and reconfiguring our relationship with such systems.  


Welcome to Your New NSA Partner Network: Report from Transmediale 2014


We're running our annual community campaign through March 19. Give today!

Photo: Andreas Nicolas Fischer.

A kind of cold weather antipode of summer's "Love Parade," the Transmediale 2014 media arts festival was a beacon of light in the long dusk of a Berlin winter. As a twist on the usual curated exhibition, this year's festival opted for an ad-hoc "Art Hack Day" (AHD) approach, where submitting artists were expected to create new and original artworks in the span of two days (and nights). Opening the exhibition with a more down-to-earth feel, AHD ultimately resembled a DIY, garage-style party instead of a highbrow exhibition space.


Art In Your Pocket 3: Sensor Driven iPad and iPhone Art Apps


 PXL, Rainer Kohlberger, 2012

As the iPhone just celebrated its fifth year on the market, artists have already made a substantial dent in the commercially lucrative world of Apple’s AppStore. Despite this success, artists are still pushing forward to build apps that further integrate with the device’s sensors and location-based capabilities. Rather than working solely within the context of software art as I have covered in two previous articles on the subject for Rhizome, there is a focus now on artists who are interacting with the physical world by using the device’s internal sensors, location capabilities, constant Internet connectivity, and built-in cameras.


 

“Konfetti”, Stephan Maximillian Huber, 2012

 

Using the camera as a sensor, “Konfetti” by German based designer Stephan Maximillian Huber visualizes the image of its subject into countless dots. In effect, the camera image is translated into virtual confetti that follows any movement and creates an ever changing images based on which camera is selected. The dot’s movement is correlated to the detected flow captured by the camera and by repelling other dots, which also move as you touch and drag them. Huber explains over email how the app works as a reflection based art tool. “The app started as an iPad-only app, and on an iPad the app acts like a mirror, showing an abstract reflection of yourself. You'll get a clear image of yourself only when you concentrate on the process of the app, and don't move too fast. It's like contemplating about yourself and the image of yourself. And as your thoughts and emotions aren't static the image the app generates is dynamic and adapts to minimal movements and new ...

 


Art in Your Pocket 2


In the summer of 2009, I wrote an article here at Rhizome about the burgeoning activities of media artists creating new works or updating versions of their older interactive screen-based projects for Apple's iPhone and iTouch mobile devices. As the article made its way throughout the blogosphere, comments surfaced ranging from criticism of the "closed world of Apple's App Store and iPhone devices" to a championing of the availability of inexpensive multi-touch technology now available to artists who had been waiting for a platform that could adequately display and allow for the type of interaction their projects demanded. A year after the article came out, the draw of these devices and their potentially expansive audience has become even more irresistible to artists enough so that several more "apps" have surfaced. The following article catalogs several new iPhone works which have emerged over the past year, works that are pioneering the next generation of portable media art.


Top 5 - 10


129038558633520150.jpg
Image from There I Fixed It

Jonah Brucker-Cohen is a researcher, artist, professor and writer. His writing has appeared in numerous international publications including WIRED Magazine, Make Magazine, Neural, Rhizome, Art Asia Pacific, Gizmodo and more, and his work has been shown at events such as DEAF (03,04), Art Futura (04), SIGGRAPH (00,05), UBICOMP (02,03,04), CHI (04,06) Transmediale (02,04,08), NIME (07), ISEA (02,04,06,09), Institute of Contemporary Art in London (04), Whitney Museum of American Art's ArtPort (03), Ars Electronica (02,04,08), Chelsea Art Museum, ZKM Museum of Contemporary Art (04-5),Museum of Modern Art (MOMA - NYC)(2008), and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) (2008). He received his Ph.D. in the Disruptive Design Team of the Networking and Telecommunications Research Group (NTRG), Trinity College Dublin. He is an adjunct assistant professor of communications at NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) and in the Media, Culture, Communication dept of NYU Steinhardt School of Culture Education and Human Development.



2009 was an important year for the Internet as a whole. The advent of web 2.0 and "crowdsourcing" initiatives has enabled a much richer array of content from users who might never have ventured onto the Internet in previous years. My top 10 sites for this year cover a wide range of topics from art made for mobile devices with iPhoneArt.org to evidence of both information saturation with Information Aesthetics and physical and pseudo intellectual abundance with This is Why You're Fat and There I Fixed It, to strange observances of mistakes in the public realm with Fail Blog. In addition to these crowdsourced content sites, I also see some ongoing potential with artist-created sites such as Brett Domino's lowtech approach to music making ...

READ ON »



Discussions (40) Opportunities (1) Events (2) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

SimpleTEXT: June 5th @ EYEBEAM NYC (Tomorrow Night!)


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SimpleTEXT: June 5th, 2007 @ EYEBEAM, NYC

* Below is information about the next SimpleTEXT peformance on
Tuesday, June 5th, 2007 @ Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology
(http://www.eyebeam.org)

This event is in conjunction with the Upgrade NYC
http://www.eyebeam.org/upgrade/

Please forward to those who might be interested in attending the performance!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SimpleTEXT
*a cell phone enabled interactive performance* by Family Filter
URL: http://www.simpletext.info

When:
Tuesday, June 5th, 2007 (7:30 pm) - Beginning with a talk by Jonah
Brucker-Cohen, Performance at 8pm)

Bring your Cell phone and/or Wireless Laptop to contribute to the performance!

Where:
EYEBEAM
540 W. 21st Street, (between 10th and 11th Avenues)
New York, NY 10011
Web Site: http://www.oboro.net
Map Link: http://tinyurl.com/2qb28h

----------------------------------------------------------------

THIS EVENT IS FREE TO ALL

About SimpleTEXT:
SimpleTEXT is a collaborative audio/visual public performance that
relies on audience participation through input from mobile devices
such as phones, PDAs or laptops. SimpleTEXT focuses on dynamic input
from participants as essential to the overall output. The performance
creates a dialogue between participants who submit text messages
which control the audiovisual output of the installation. These
messages are first parsed according to a code that dictates how the
music is created, and then rhythmically drive a speech synthesizer
and a picture synthesizer in order to create a compelling,
collaborative audiovisual performance.

To date, SimpleTEXT has been shown 13 times in 9 countries across
Europe and North America.

SimpleTEXT focuses on mobile devices and the web as a bridge between
networked interfaces and public space. As mobile devices become more
prolific, they also become separated by increased emphasis on
individual use. The SimpleTEXT project looks beyond the screen and
isolated usage of mobile devices to encourage collaborative use of
input devices to both drive the visuals and audio output, inform each
participant of each other's interaction, and allows people to
actively participate in the performance while it happens.Our purpose
with the performance is to create the possibility of large-scale
interaction through anonymous collaboration, with immediate audio and
visual feedback. SimpleTEXT encourages users to respond to one
another's ideas and build upon the unexpected chains of ideas that
may develop from their input..

SimpleTEXT is an example of an interactive piece that works well in
crowded public spaces such as social and unruly atmospheres where
heckling, irony, criticism, and sarcasm are common modes of
communication. The project is a large-scale piece in terms of scale
of audience interaction, where the communication between audience
members is tangible and direct.

Support/Sponsors:
SimpleTEXT is created by Family Filter, a collaboration between Jonah
Brucker-Cohen, Tim Redfern, and Duncan Murphy. It was originally
funded by a commission from Low-Fi, an new media arts organization
based in London, UK. This event is sponsored and hosted by EYEBEAM
and The UpGrade.

Eyebeam: http://www.eyebeam.org
The Upgrade: http://www.theupgrade.net

LINKS:
About SimpleTEXT including video documentation: http://www.simpletext.info
SimpleTEXT video on YouTube: http://tinyurl.com/kd9yw

Jonah Brucker-Cohen - http://www.coin-operated.com
Tim Redfern - http://www.eclectronics.org

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DISCUSSION

Corrections to Report from Futuresonic 2007


Below are a couple corrections to the report that I wrote about
FutureSonic 2007 - for the record:

1) FutureSonic is in is its 11th year, not 12th as I reported.

2) Drew Hemment organized the conference and speakers, and invited
Anne Galloway to be its 'host', and brief the speakers. I reported
that Anne organized it alone.

Sincerely,
Jonah Brucker-Cohen

DISCUSSION

Conference Report: Futuresonic 2007 Festival


+Commissioned by Rhizome+

Conference Report: Futuresonic 2007 Festival
Social Technologies Summit
May 10-12, Manchester, UK
http://www.futuresonic.com

by Jonah Brucker-Cohen

2007 marked the 12th year of Futuresonic, a festival that began as a
sound art/ music festival and has morphed into a media art/ mobile
communications-themed event with concerts, exhibitions, talks, and
screenings staged all over the city of Manchester, England. This
year's festival focused on topics ranging from "Free Media" to "Urban
Playgrounds" to "Network Infrastructures" and featured a wide array
of speakers, artists, musicians, and thinkers from around the globe
converging on this urban landscape.

Futuresonic featured a new addition to its exhibition this year,
called "Art For Shopping Centres," which included three
newly-commissioned art pieces staged inside the city's "Arndale
Shopping Centre," a large indoor mall in the center of Manchester's
bustling inner city. British artist Graham Harwood's "NetMonster" is
a net-scraper application that searches and compiles data on the
Internet for historical information related to the 1996 IRA bombing
that devastated the city centre near the Arndale, injuring over 200
people. Meanwhile, Dave Valentine of MediaShed (in which Harwood is
also involved) created "Methods of Movement: The Duellists" a
videography of two "le parkour acrobats" running through the empty
Arndale at night, in a continual "duel" that was filmed entirely
though the shopping arena's CCTV camera system. This project marked
the first use of MediaShed's "GEARBOX Free-Media Toolkit", an open
source software application co-developed with Eyebeam's Production
Lab, that allows for video editing on free platforms. New York-based
artist Katherine Moriwaki's piece, "Everything Really is Connected
After All," consisted of a flock of mobile devices that, when brought
within radio range of each other, produced emergent audio narratives
about the shopping and downtown areas of the city (as told by
Manchester locals). The intent of the piece was to focus on the
shopping mall as a "non-place" or location that is both unique but
still identical in any location around the world.

In the panel discussions and artist talks, lively debates ensued
about the state of mobility in public spaces and how, through
technological interjections into these spaces, new forms of dialogue
can occur. Ottawa-based Anthropologist and avid blogger Anne Galloway
organized the conference speakers this year which ranged from
sociologists to engineers, social scientists, and corporate
researchers, all examining urban space with a critical viewpoint on
topics ranging from wireless networks to urban gaming to mobile
systems that propagate across economic and social boundaries. The
conference itself examined how technology use has become a "social
practice" from open hardware and software platforms to collaborative
applications that allow multiple users to engage in the creative
process at once. This "Socialization" of technology was evident
through the various speakers that presented on how distributed
systems can enable new forms of urban interventions and
collaborative interventions into the city space as an organic
creature. This year's festival also held Manchester's first Dorkbot
event. Local artist Steve Symons spoke about his MUIO
(http://www.muio.org) interface, a real-time, multi-platform, and
open source hardware system (similar to the popular Arduino but
without the need for any programming) that allows for sensing the
external world and inputting data into applications like PureData,
Max/MSP, SuperCollider, and Processing through a standard USB
interface.

Although FutureSonic is in its 12th year, the festival is still
struggling with defining itself amongst the now multifarious amounts
of events focused on how "media arts" meet mobile technologies and
platforms. This year's line up of impressive speakers and interesting
commissions added some interesting discussions into the mix. Through
the next few years, it will be interesting to see how the festival
grows and adapts to the current changes in media arts and how
successfully it retains its focus on mobile technologies in order to
steer away from the larger, all encompassing events that include
every form and category of media art practice.

DISCUSSION

Report From ARS @ ARCO 2006


+Commissioned by Rhizome.org+

Report from ARS@ARCO
Madrid, Spain
Feb 8-9, 2006
by Jonah Brucker-Cohen (jonah_at_coin-operated.com)

During a temperate February in Madrid, the 25th
annual ARCO Art fair descended on the Spanish
Capital with close to 180,000 visitors, including
museum and art centre directors, gallery owners,
and representatives of international
institutions. The work of over 2,000 artists was
included in the event. From artwork in booths at
the convention center to those scattered in
galleries around the city, as well as many
speaking engagements, the fair was a massive
homage to the art industry as both a global
business venture and a cultural phenomenon. This
year's specially-invited country was Austria,
which brought along a wide array of digital art
projects curated by the Ars Electronica center in
Linz. Accompanying this exhibition was a
symposium on the theme of the "Future of Media
Arts" with artists from Austria and other invited
international visitors, curators, and theorists.

Located north west of downtown Madrid, the Conde
Duque complex housed the "Digital Transit" show
featuring interactive projects in an exhibition
curated by the Ars Electronica Center. Included
in the show were some projects from the
interactive art canon, such as Camille
Utterback's "Text Rain" and Christa Sommerer and
Laurent Mignonneau's "Life Species II." Other
projects in the show included John Gerrard's
"Watchful Portrait," two 3D portraits whose gazes
follow the sun or moon through each day and
night, and in the bio-art domain was
DNA-Consult's "GFPixel DH Portrait," a painting of
4000 Petri-dishes filled with genetically
transformed bacteria that produce green light.
Also in the show was Christian Moller's "Cheese,"
a video installation of six young actresses
attempting to hold a "smile" for over an hour
while video tracking measures the "sincerity" of
their smiles. An alarm sounded if their
"happiness" fell below a certain level. Most of
the projects in the exhibition had strong visual
components, including Norbert Pfaffenbichler,
Michael Aschauer and Lotte Schreiber's "24!," a
spatial audio-visual installation consisting of
24 pedestals in a grid formation with a
projection of a black pixel on the surface of
each. The pixel's movement is based on a simple
mathematical structure giving it 24 possible
movements to cover all corners of the square,
thus creating a cascade of sounds during these
movements. Examining public data sets was
Ubermorgen.com's "Vote Auction," a website that
offered US citizens a chance to sell their
presidential vote to online bidders during the
2000 elections which resulted in several states
issuing temporary restraining orders for "illegal
vote trading."

Across the plaza from the Digital Transit show
was the "Condition PostMedia" show curated by
Elisabeth Fiedler y Christa Steinle. This
exhibition featured projects attempting to bridge
boundaries between preconceived notions of media
art and more traditional art forms. A highlight
of this exhibition was the "Shockbot Corejulio,"
by Austrian artists Emanuel Andel and Christian
Guetzer, which consisted of a computer that ran a
program instructing it to "shock" itself by
lowering a metal instrument on top of its exposed
video card. The result was garbled video output
that attested to the frailties of modern
technology and its obedience to succumb to its
own demise. This project also recently won an
award at the Transmediale 2005 festival in Berlin.

North of the city, the Ars@ARCO symposium got
underway at the ARCO fair. The intent of the
panelists was to give their vision of where Media
Art will be in the next five to ten years.
Gerfried Stocker, director of Ars Electronica and
organizer of the panels and exhibitions began the
day by stating that the term "media art" is
problematic because it harbors too many
definitions such as "cyber art," "digital art,"
"virtual art," "software art," "net.art," or
"interactive art." The main focus seemed to be
that digital art had moved away from the gallery
as the only way of seeing the work and was now
more integrated in arenas such as the Internet
and other "happenings" in public spaces. Heidi
Grundmann opened the panels with a presentation
of her work in "Radio art."

Focusing on media art in an international
context, the second panel featured artists,
curators, and facilitators representing work from
Africa, Asia, South America, and India. Jose
Carlos Mareitegui, from Peru, spoke on how
technology enables the "de-materialization" of
information that has created a new artistic space
for artists who can update their work on a
continuous basis. Geetha Narayanan, director of
the Srishti School for Art and Technology in
Bangalore, India spoke about how new media art
from post-materialistic societies will be
different than those from developing countries by
shifting from "consumption" to "quality of life"
oriented approaches. Elaine Ng, director of Art
Asia Pacific Magazine, spoke on how Japan is not
reflective of the greater art scene in Asia and
how Korea and Taiwan are beginning to follow the
technological lead of Japan. Focusing on the
African continent, Marcus Neustatter, curator and
artist in the "Trinity Session" of Johannesburg,
South Africa, spoke about how future media
artists are a mixture of everything from
entrepreneurs, to musicians, to filmmakers and
how the distinction between media artists and
those trained technically is decreasing.

The third panel featured artists and art
historians working in various media arts fields.
I spoke about my work in deconstructing network
relationships and how the future of media arts
relates to open systems and reconfigurable
rule-sets that change dynamically based on user
interaction. Beijing-based game artist Feng Meng
Bo spoke about his work in alternative gaming
interfaces and his project "Q3," in which he
digitally inserted himself carrying a camcorder
into the Quake 3 gaming environment. Also on the
panel was Dr.Katja Kwastek, an assistant
professor of Art History at the University of
Munich, who spoke about media arts from an
historical perspective. Derrick De Kerkove,
director of the Marshall McLuhan Program in
Culture and Technology, at the University of
Toronto, wrapped up the session saying that "More
and more the consumer has the capacity to modify,
shift, and obtain ownership of art," and that the
"Art" is the act of this manipulation itself,
where rules are broken by consumers. In the
larger sense, most, if not all, interactive media
art has rules associated with it and the future
will see the audience redefine and break those
rules through their interaction. The resulting
system will then be integrated back into the work.

As the ARS@ARCO event wound down, it was obvious
that the future of media arts remains a difficult
subject to clearly articulate. From commercial
and private research centers to art labs
releasing projects for the public domain, to the
independent artist working in their studio, the
creators of this type of art propagate from so
many different outlets and outlooks. With trends
in the blog-o-sphere pointing at DIY aesthetics
and "amateurs" creating inventive hacks to
existing consumer electronics products, the idea
of what "art" consists of, in this field,
constantly needs redefinition. The artists
involved in the symposium came to the conclusion
that media art is not only about using a medium
to express oneself, it is also about questioning
the very circumstances, time, place, and most
importantly, method and culture in which they are
working.

DISCUSSION

new name for Net Art News?


I think we should rename Net Art News:

"PLEASE DO NOT SPAM ART"

That would definitely get the point across
jbc