Joanne McNeil
Works in Brooklyn United States of America

BIO
writer (Los Angeles Times, Wired UK, Frieze, etc) // former editor of rhizome.org

Shana Moulton on ART21


Should an artist separate herself from the character she creates? In this film, artist Shana Moulton traces the development of her ongoing video and performance series Whispering Pines and its central protagonist Cynthia. Shana charts the various ways in which fiction and autobiography meld and diverge in the character of Cynthia, played by the artist herself. The title of the series is an homage to David Lynch’s Twin Peaks and adopts the name of Shana’s childhood home: a trailer park for seniors near Yosemite, California. Featuring video and music from several episodes of Whispering Pines—a mix of live action, computer animation, and original songs by Jacob Ciocci and Nick Hallett.

Shana Moulton (b. 1976, Oakhurst, California, USA) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

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Kevin Slavin's Talk on How Augmented Reality isn't Real Enough


"Reality is augmented when it feels different, not when it looks different. And when the senses of time and obligation, and rewards are altered, maybe the aspiration of 3-d optical augmented reality begins to feel a little bit like pornography. Like a thin veneer of the actual experience that is flattened for the eye—that is rendered for the eye, which is the one sense most easily fooled to begin with," said Kevin Slavin (co-founder of Area/Code) recently at Mobile Monday Amsterdam. It's a thought-provoking talk, and one bound to be referenced in years to come as augmented reality transitions from cyborg theory buzzword to an unavoidable component of the digital experience.

Slavin quotes film studies professor Elena Gorfinkel (cited in Salen and Zimmerman’s book Rules of Play): " The confusion in this conversation has emerged because representational strategies are conflated with the effect of immersion. Immersion itself is not tied to a replication or mimesis of reality. For example one can get immersed in Tetris. Therefore, immersion into game play seems at least as important as immersion into a games’s representational space." He considers augmented reality as an uncanny valley "not for the human face, but for the actual world around us."

And here's a great response to the talk from Rhizome contributor Greg J. Smith on his blog Serial Consign:

[T]he initial buzz was slightly misleading as it suggested that the presentation was an outright dismissal of AR. I don't really think this was the case...My reading of the talk is that Slavin is extremely curious about augmenting reality—as praxis—and suggesting we (startups, developers and consumers) need to be considerably more thoughtful in our application/exploration of the emerging medium and consider how it might activate other senses – AR ...

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Weekend Clicking


Graphic Design for Olivetti Flickr set via @bruces/ @geetadayal
  • I handed the telephone to the applicant, and sat down. Then followed that queerest of all the queer things in this world,—a conversation with only one end to it. You hear questions asked; you don't hear the answer. You hear invitations given; you hear no thanks in return. You have listening pauses of dead silence, followed by apparently irrelevant and unjustifiable exclamations of glad surprise, or sorrow, or dismay. You can't make head or tail of the talk, because you never hear anything that the person at the other end of the wire says. - Mark Twain writes about the telephone in the June 1880 Atlantic Magazine (via Kottke)
  • Jon Rafman and Mr. Doob on this year's Creativity 50 list.
  • Speculative Realism blog name generator e.g. "Hyperchaotic Nominalism." (Voyou)
  • Review of Stan VanDerBeek show at MIT List Gallery (Frieze)
  • Because Artaud repeatedly proclaimed himself a poet and a madman, his practice — his singular performativity of ideas — has been easily incorporated into our histories of high modernism. But Weil — a young woman, clumsy, cerebral, thin, and poorly dressed — wrote no manifestoes. Consequently, her work remains as vulnerable in death as it was in life. Chris Kraus writes about Simone Weil for LA Review of Books
  • The Journey Into the Past, Present and Future of African Animation (African Digital Art)
  • Cao Fei on Art21
  • Kevin Kelly writes about Internet Archive's book preservation initiative, which includes a physical archive, We are in a special moment that will not last beyond the end of this century: Paper books are plentiful. They are cheap and everywhere, from airports to drug stores to libraries to bookstores to the shelves of millions of homes. There has never been a better time to be ...
  • READ ON »


    Speculative at LACE


    Xarene Eskandar, Other Earth Artifacts II / HVAC, 2008

    Christopher O'Leary, Blocking the Exits, 2011

    Images from "Speculative" at LACE (Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions) curated by Christopher O’Leary and Zach Blas:

    Today, we see the world we live in as an inviable world, and yet a world poised for radical reconfiguration. From global economic crises to pandemic panics to burgeoning forms of hatred and control to the ravaging of our earth, new borders and quarantines haunt and terrorize the world at stochastic levels of the global, nation-state, informatics, and the biological. Indeed, our world presents to us the seemingly complete commodification of life, culture, the body, the planet. Yet, we find within these very inviabilities the kernels of potential to enact and push forward new ways, worlds, and lives. In fact, we see many up-risings emerging everywhere: from the calls to action of militant groups like The Invisible Committee to the UC student protests to the insurrections of the Middle East to the digital activisims of WikiLeaks and Anonymous. These all point toward living and existing in the world another way. We see the SPECULATIVE as the uniting force in our artwork that conjures forth the potential of the world we want, in political, cultural, social, sexual, technological, biological, economic, and ecological dimensions...

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    Samuel Beckett in 3-D


    "...Abode where lost bodies roam each searching for its lost one. Vast enough for search to be in vain. Narrow enough for light to be in vain. Inside a flattened cylinder fifty metres round and sixteen high for the sake of harmony..." Samuel Beckett, The Lost Ones, 1972

    UNMAKEABLELOVE is a revisioning of Becketts initial investigation that focuses and makes interactively tangible, a state of confrontation and interpolation between our selves and another society that is operating in a severe state of physical and psychological entropy. UNMAKEABLELOVE advances the practices of algorithmic agency, artificial life, virtual communities, human computer interaction, augmented virtuality, mixed reality and multimedia performance to engage the bodys primordial inscriptions. It locates Becketts society of lost ones in a virtual space that represents a severe state of physical confinement, evoking perhaps a prison, an asylum, a detention camp, or even a reality TV show.

    While in UNMAKEABLELOVE the inhabitants of the cylinder remain oblivious in their condition, and we the viewers of their world, with our probing torch lights and prying gaze, are positioned as the ‘other’, forced to experience the anomalies of a perceptual disequilibrium that implicates us in this alienated narrative. The resulting ambiguity and complicit agency in UNMAKEABLELOVE reinforces a perceptual and psychological tension between ‘self’ and ‘other’ generated by the works’ mixed reality strategies of embodied simulation.

    New Scientist takes a look at the performance staged at this year's Hong Kong Art Fair.

    via Open Culture

    READ ON »



    Discussions (2) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (5)
    JOB

    Editorial Fellow


    Deadline:
    Fri Dec 28, 2012 14:00

    Rhizome seeks an Editorial Fellow from January through May 2013. The Fellow will support the editorial department at Rhizome through research and writing for the website. This position is a unique opportunity for a person with strong dedication to the fields of contemporary art and technology to further develop professional skills.

    The Editorial Fellow is ideally based in New York and must be able to commit to 16 hours of work per week for 5 months. This position is unpaid, but academic credit may be arranged. The Editorial Fellow will coordinate and assist in production of Rhizome's website and weekly newsletter Rhizome News. Fellow will support daily publishing and maintenance of the blog, as well as researching and writing editorial essays, reviews, and opinion pieces.

    QUALIFICATIONS: Candidates must have a high level of familiarity with contemporary art and technology. Education or advanced experience beyond the undergraduate level is preferred. The candidate must have very strong writing, editing, and analytical skills, and very high internet literacy.

    TO APPLY: Please email a cover letter, resume or c.v., two references, and three writing samples (url or attachment) to Joanne McNeil at editor(at)rhizome.org. Deadline Dec 28, 2012. Review of applications will begin immediately. Starting date is January 2013.


    DISCUSSION

    Improving Prometheus


    The script is available on his website. Here is the link again to http://starwarsmodern.blogspot.com/2012/08/prometheus-rebound_14.html

    JOB

    Editorial Fellow


    Deadline:
    Fri Aug 24, 2012 19:45

    Rhizome seeks an Editorial Fellow from September through December 2012. The Fellow will support the editorial department at Rhizome through research and writing for the website. This position is a unique opportunity for a person with strong dedication to the fields of contemporary art and technology to further develop professional skills.

    The Editorial Fellow is ideally based in New York and must be able to commit to 16 hours of work per week for 4 months, beginning in Summer 2012. This position is unpaid, but academic credit may be arranged. The Editorial Fellow will coordinate and assist in production of Rhizome's website and weekly newsletter Rhizome News. Fellow will support daily publishing and maintenance of the blog, as well as researching and writing editorial essays, reviews, and opinion pieces.

    QUALIFICATIONS: Candidates must have a high level of familiarity with contemporary art and technology. Education or advanced experience beyond the undergraduate level is preferred. The candidate must have very strong writing, editing, and analytical skills, and very high internet literacy.

    TO APPLY: Please email a cover letter, resume or c.v., two references, and three writing samples (url or attachment) to Joanne McNeil at editor(at)rhizome.org. Deadline Aug 24, 2012. Review of applications will begin immediately. Starting date is Sept 17, 2012.


    DISCUSSION

    NA - Further Thoughts


    Hi Patrick,

    Thanks so much for these comments. You are right that the New Aesthetic is a broad conversation, but James Bridle's investigation is definitely political, unfortunately many of his points have been missed in the ongoing metacommentary. It seems a lot of people are confused by the visuals, which aren't *the* the New Aesthetic so much as artifacts *of* the New Aesthetic.

    The NA Tumblr was Bridle thinking out loud, and something to consider in tandem with his writing/talks. Meanwhile, the conversation about these ideas has gone on for over a year now, over a number of blogs, mostly based in London

    In addition to James Bridle's talks and notes, this is what I recommend reading to understand what the New Aesthetic conversation is really about:

    Aaron Straup Cope's notes from SXSW:
    http://www.aaronland.info/weblog/2012/03/13/godhelpus/#sxaesthetic

    Chris Heathcote: A New Fashion Aesthetic
    http://anti-mega.com/antimega/2012/04/02/a-new-fashion-aesthetic

    Many, many BERG posts:
    http://berglondon.com/blog/2011/05/13/sensor-vernacular/
    http://berglondon.com/blog/2012/02/06/robot-readable-world-the-film/
    http://berglondon.com/blog/2011/08/03/the-robot-readable-world/

    We are the droids we’re looking for: the New Aesthetic and its friendly critics by JJ Charlesworth
    http://blog.jjcharlesworth.com/2012/05/07/we-are-the-droids-were-looking-for-the-new-aesthetic-and-its-friendly-critics/

    Honor Harger:
    https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A2=ind1204&L=new-media-curating&F=&S=&P=20818

    Tom Armitage:
    http://infovore.org/archives/2011/05/21/waving-at-the-machines/

    Greg Borenstein:
    http://urbanhonking.com/ideasfordozens/2011/06/07/on-the-future-and-poetry-of-the-calibration-pose/

    Natalia Buckley:
    http://ntlk.net/2012/04/12/on-the-new-aesthetic/

    Other notes from SXSW are linked here:
    http://booktwo.org/notebook/sxaesthetic/

    this was my favorite New Aesthetic tumblr post, btw:
    http://new-aesthetic.tumblr.com/post/21437296950/i-used-to-go-to-the-trocadero-in-central-london-as

    JOB

    Editorial Fellow


    Deadline:
    Tue May 01, 2012 10:00

    Rhizome seeks an Editorial Fellow from June through September 2012. The Fellow will support the editorial department at Rhizome through research and writing for the website. This position is a unique opportunity for a person with strong dedication to the fields of contemporary art and technology to further develop professional skills.

    The Editorial Fellow must be based in New York and must be able to commit to 16 hours of work per week for 3 months, beginning in Summer 2012. This position is unpaid, but academic credit may be arranged. The Editorial Fellow will coordinate and assist in production of Rhizome's website and weekly newsletter Rhizome News. Fellow will support daily publishing and maintenance of the blog, as well as researching and writing editorial essays, reviews, and opinion pieces.

    QUALIFICATIONS: Candidates must have a high level of familiarity with contemporary art and new media. Education or advanced experience beyond the undergraduate level is preferred. The candidate must have very strong writing, editing, and analytical skills, and very high internet literacy.

    TO APPLY: Please email a cover letter, resume or c.v., two references, and three writing samples (url or attachment) to Joanne McNeil at editor(at)rhizome.org. Deadline May 4, 2012. Review of applications will begin immediately. Starting date is June 4, 2012.