Joanne McNeil
Works in Brooklyn United States of America

BIO
writer (Los Angeles Times, Wired UK, Frieze, etc) // former editor of rhizome.org

The Artist Google Street View Photographed Twice


Carlo Zanni, Self Portrait With Dog, (2008)

 

Carlo Zanni's "Self Portrait with Dog" (2008) and "Self Portrait with Friends" (2012) both include the artist captured in Google Street View. Recently I emailed the Zanni about these projects:


Could you tell me a little bit about the Google Street View pictures "Self Portrait with Dog" (2008) and "Self Portrait with Friends" (2012)? 


They are part of an exploration around portraiture I began in 2000 designing desktop icons, programming  cookies, and making google images generated drawings.

In either cases, it's me on the street in Milan being shot by the Google Car. The first one back in 2008, the second one in 2012.

In "Self-Portrait With Dog," I'm walking my dog and I choose that frame among others from the street view sequence (that you can still browse from the project's homepage) because of its composition. It is also a classic theme in portraiture and it has a link to a famous work by futurist painter Giacomo Balla: "Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash", 1912. Both explore the idea of time and space, with mine having strong ties with very urgent themes like public exposure, privacy and control.

In "Self-Portrait With Friends (i fannulloni)" I've been shot with two pals while lying around like slackers. "i fannulloni" — that is the wall writing on the left of the picture — means slackers. You might find an assonance with "I Vitelloni" by Federico Fellini. Even in this case, I chose this frame for its composition values and when shown in gray scale as it has to be, its "neo realistic" side pops up.

Naming these works "self portraits", and not "portraits made by Google" — like suggested by curator Pau Waelder — ironically plays with the idea that I had a ...

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The Junk Ships on Alibaba


1.

Around the corner from stacks of baby shoes, counterfeit Gucci wallets, and spangled iPhone cases, I got burned copies of Jean Cocteau's Orpheus trilogy at an outdoor market in Mexico City.

A Sunday afternoon in Roma Norte, I was drinking coffee with new friends. The city was new to me and I had only arrived late the night before. We jumped in a cab and directed the driver to a market a little way outside the center of town.

Miguel said he was going to pick up a copy of Pigsty there. I was confused at first, assuming it had to be something other than the 1969 Italian film, but indeed that was the one he meant. Seemed an implausible feat to find a physical copy of any Passolini movie, let alone a more obscure selection, anywhere without paying for shipping and waiting at least a week. But I didn't say anything then.

"He's not going to find the Passolini film here," Manuel said, as we were wandering through Tepito's labyrinth of tents. It was mostly pirated goods: branded tennis shoes, video games, and handbags; but with some intention to the ordering of the inventory. Suppliers tended to specialize in certain items, one might carry only knock-offs of a single particular designer label, another sold only anime DVDs. Tepito sometimes functions as a wholesaler for vendors who operate smaller streetside sales. We walked through the section that was largely physical media for sale— Blue-ray, DVD, and CDs with covers varying from identical to the original to very handmade-looking inkjet prints. I was told that sometimes you could see vendors burning these disks in the back of the tents.

One of the tents had a sign out front, "Cine de Arte." Inside a dozen densely packed shelves included classic art house fare like 400 Blows, Breathless, Paris Texas, and L'eclisse. Each with a cover made of ordinary printer paper inside a flimsy plastic sleeve...


Community Fundraiser: Focus on Editorial


Have you enjoyed an article Rhizome published recently? Have you saved any of our features on Instapaper or emailed a story to your friends? Is there something you first saw on this website that inspired you or made you consider things in a new way?

I invite you to consider making a donation to Rhizome. Your donation allows us to continue our editorial operations and maintain our independent voice.

This past year alone, Rhizome’s editorial team has covered a breathtaking range of topics relating to the intersection of art and technology. Here are several highlights:

Martin Murphy's desktop from Adam Cruces's Desktop Views, featured in Beyond the Surface: 15 Years of Desktop Aesthetics

Photoshopped Sherman
Rachel Wetzler considers how we might think of Cindy Sherman’s photography now that she uses Photoshop in her practice.

Beyond the Surface: 15 Years of Desktop Aesthetics
Using Adam Cruces’ Desktop Views (a response to Alexei Shulgin’s Desktop Is,) as a jumping off point, Jason Huff explores the history of desktop aesthetics.

Screen. Image. Text.
As publishing moves from the page to the screen, Orit Gat considers the unique role of the digital image. She later spoke about this essay on a panel at the Frieze Art Fair.

Shu Lea Cheang on Brandon
Yin Ho speaks with the creator of the Guggenheim Museum’s first digital project, 14 years after its launch.

Image of Democracy: Why I Want to Build Nine Freedom Towers in Tiananmen Square
A personal essay by artist John Powers on public space and its political implications.

The Impermanent Book
An essay from The Piracy Project, an international publishing and exhibition project, on the mutability of text in both physical and digital books.

The Shape of Shaping Things to Come
Speculating on 3D printing’s potential to ...

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Jeff Noon's Sporecast


 

 

Jeff Noon's tweets are reliably among of the best contemporary fiction works today —beautiful stories told over short bursts, each under 140 characters. He calls the stories "microspores" and fans have submitted art and music to a tumblr collection. Wedged in between Romney quips, #FFs, and everyday social media-ing, the economy of his words as well as the context makes them all the more satisfying; like momentarily fading out of a conversation to recall last night's dream.

 

 

Last night, Noon, the author of several novels, (Vurt, Falling Out of Cars, the recently released Channel Sk1n, among others), had an especially frenized twitter feed — posting 50 stories at once and retweeting fiction responses. The "Sporecast" was so active, Twitter throttled his account multiple times that evening. 

 

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The Eternal Internet Brotherhood



 

Recently, Angelo Plessas assembled artists, writers, and curators working with technology in an event called The Eternal Internet Brotherhood. I asked him the following questions over email about the event, which concluded on August 23rd:

What was the inspiration for the Eternal Internet Brotherhood?

I was always inspired by various alternative and autonomous communities getting together to push the limits of creativity. In our days the internet is a place where new realities are taking form and I believe is not only "embodied" through our screens anymore. The Eternal Internet Brotherhood is an experiment of how these realities continue to extend after/beyond the limits of the web, a shelter from the visual provincialism of technology within which we now live.  The interface we use for this spiritual and creative journey is the mystical island of Anafi in Greece, the place which ancient god Apollo "teleported" as a shelter for the Argonauts.