JM Haefner
Since 2002
Works in Menomonie, Wisconsin United States of America

BIO
J.M. Haefner's art varies from computer-mediated art to artist's books, collage, and photography. Through combining imagery and materials, the artist layers meanings and concepts which are often framed within a feminist context. The work is sometimes considered reactionary based on political, social, or environmental issues.

With degrees in Advertising Design and Photography and a MFA in Interactive Forms, MS Haefner has taught in these areas, and worked professionally as a Web Designer and Online Course Developer, and is currently involved developing various Web presence on a University of Wisconsin campus and spearheading a campus-wide e-portfolio initiative for a Title III grant in addition to teaching multimedia in an Art and Design Department. Presently, she is working on developing the first interdisciplinary Game Design and Development course at her university along with a colleague in Computer Science.

Her areas of interest include: Web 2 interaction and emerging design principles, interfacing with the metaverse (Second Life) and video conferencing with an interest toward learning communities, learning portfolios, student-centered teaching, and game design and theory.

She currently serves as Chair of the Minneapolis - Saint Paul ACM SIGGRAPH Professional Chapter, and is seeking a Ph. D. in Education Technology.
Discussions (20) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Thom Yorke / Howard Zinn


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intended

1. aimed at or designed for
2. planned for the future
3. said or done deliberately

interpretation

1. an explanation or establishment of the meaning or significance of
something
2. an ascription of a particular meaning or significance to something
3. the way in which an artistic work, for example, a play or piece of
music, is performed so as to convey a particular understanding of the
work
4. the oral translation of what is said in one language into another,
so that speakers of different languages can communicate

I presume you were going for # 4?

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<bold><fontfamily><param>Times</param>intended</fontfamily></bold><fontfamily><param>Times</param>

</fontfamily>1. <fontfamily><param>Times</param>aimed at or designed
for

</fontfamily>2. <fontfamily><param>Times</param>planned for the future

</fontfamily>3. <fontfamily><param>Times</param>said or done
deliberately

<bold>interpretation</bold>

</fontfamily>1. <fontfamily><param>Times</param>an explanation or
establishment of the meaning or significance of something

</fontfamily>2. <fontfamily><param>Times</param>an ascription of a
particular meaning or significance to something

</fontfamily>3. <fontfamily><param>Times</param>the way in which an
artistic work, for example, a play or piece of music, is performed so
as to convey a particular understanding of the work

</fontfamily>4. <fontfamily><param>Times</param>the oral translation
of what is said in one language into another, so that speakers of
different languages can communicate

I presume you were going for # 4?

</fontfamily>

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DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Thom Yorke / Howard Zinn


To say it never works is a perhaps a bit extreme. I would agree that it
is reactionary. Though the artist is recording -in a way- what is
around him or her, it's a snapshot of sorts, of a political moment.
Often, the approach is as graphic as the deed that created the
reaction, but who said art has to be pretty?

To say that it is dead because it is ugly is like saying Rap is then
dead, because it can be ugly too.

I don't think it's about absorbing that type of art but an affirmation
-that we were thinking that too, but lacked the means to "show" it.

In certain political climates, it is dangerous or is perceived as such
-to make art that is negative/political. Art can still be the harbinger
or the 'pulse of the people," and this type of art often makes our
thoughts real.

As far as the risk of interpretation... "pretty" art risks the same.
Did those O'Keefe flowers have a sexual connotation?

Moralizing is often a function of art, as is historical and political
commentary. I for one prefer to take the risk, and like it when someone
arrives at my intended interpretation. Otherwise I'd be designing
toilet paper.

-=j

> Yorke: Yeah, I don't think we are political at all, I think I'm hyper
> aware
> of the soapbox thing. It is difficult to make political art work. If
> all it
> does is exist in the realms of political discussion, it's using that
> language, and generally, it's an ugly language. It is very dead,
> definitely
> not a thing of beauty. The only reason, I think, that we go anywhere
> near it
> is because, like any reason that we buy music, these things get
> absorbed.
> These are the things surrounding your life. If you sit down and try to
> do it
> purposefully, and try to change this with this, and do this with that,
> it
> never works.

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Sociology of the Fading Signal


I didn't think you did, but having moved to a christian extremest area,
I thought you were under-selling the seriousness of the stance taken by
the religious right...and other extreme religious groups.

I am pleased to hear there are skeptics among your academic circle.
Someone in academe here in GA related getting a tour of churches by a
potential employer, as well as an invitation by another interviewer to
an event where their spouse was invited, and the SPOUSE was asked what
church they attend.

I don't generally take such an extreme (and simplified) stance, but
encounter that attitude nearly everyday. There are numerous counties in
GA where the 10 Commandments have been placed in the courthouses, and
the KKK has shown up in support at one courthouse. As I'm writing
this, I feel as though I'm coming from the underground...sort of a
"real" radio free america... not the propaganda one.

I think the enchantment with technology is somewhat reminiscent of the
drug experience of the 60s and 70s -except life is enhanced by, and can
only be experienced with technology in hand (substitute drugs here). It
does take on an obsessive shade, and I'm sure the Luddites have plenty
to say about the excesses of technology. I for one, love it.

-=j

On Friday, November 21, 2003, at 10:43 AM, mark cooley wrote:

> i didn't mean to indicate that totalitarian religious orders are not a
> problem - i too have lived in the bible belt - North Carolina and now
> Southern Missouri - so i see the effects of this, and i know that my
> relationship to an acedemic community (where there is a healthy dose
> scepticism about religious dogma) has refocused my views of these
> things. The thing that I find most interesting in terms of criticism
> in my professional/social group is the fact that many acedemics will
> talk endlessly about the "ideology" of christianity, and yet not even
> recognize the dogma of "Technological Progress". Perhaps,
> Technophilia should be a term used more often and added to the key
> words list on Rhizome for that matter - i think technophobia is
> already on there. hmmmm.
>
>
> JM Haefner wrote:
>
>> On Thursday, November 20, 2003, at 04:17 PM, mark cooley wrote:
>>
>>> you could say that insofar as we place almost total faith in
>> something
>>> (technology) that we see as existing outside of ourselves but is
>>> actually our own invention.
>>
>> so is god
>>
>>> i see it as this, but differing from religion in that we see
>>> technology as always evolving (and taking us with it) toward some
>>> higher state of existence rather than as a static order of things
>>> (religion).
>>
>> apparently people think god lives...therefore evolves
>>
>>> in this way perhaps the rhetoric around technology is even more
>>> disturbing than religious rhetoric because it allows for the
>> infinite
>>> expansion of capital.
>>
>> you should live in the bible belt...they fight about whether THEY are
>> the buckle of the belt
>>
>>> it is interesting to see the debates around biotechnology for
>> instance
>>> - many oppositional arguments focus on biotech disturbing god's
>> plan,
>>> whereas many scientific arguments for biotech center on a (supposed
>>> natural) progression of human's control (through technology of
>> course)
>>> of nature.
>>
>> the Hubble telescope has or should have upset many ideas about where
>> we
>> stand in the universe
>>
>>> both are essentialist positions but i am wondering which is better
>> or
>>> worse - in terms of reproducing the ideology of capitalism.
>> hmmmmm?
>>
>> money is god's reward
>>
>> Coming soon:
>> Art about the above, or
>> the KKK, or
>> the government.
>>
>> -=j
>>
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Sociology of the Fading Signal--Can You Hear Me Now?


On Thursday, November 20, 2003, at 04:17 PM, mark cooley wrote:

> you could say that insofar as we place almost total faith in something
> (technology) that we see as existing outside of ourselves but is
> actually our own invention.

so is god

> i see it as this, but differing from religion in that we see
> technology as always evolving (and taking us with it) toward some
> higher state of existence rather than as a static order of things
> (religion).

apparently people think god lives...therefore evolves

> in this way perhaps the rhetoric around technology is even more
> disturbing than religious rhetoric because it allows for the infinite
> expansion of capital.

you should live in the bible belt...they fight about whether THEY are
the buckle of the belt

> it is interesting to see the debates around biotechnology for instance
> - many oppositional arguments focus on biotech disturbing god's plan,
> whereas many scientific arguments for biotech center on a (supposed
> natural) progression of human's control (through technology of course)
> of nature.

the Hubble telescope has or should have upset many ideas about where we
stand in the universe

> both are essentialist positions but i am wondering which is better or
> worse - in terms of reproducing the ideology of capitalism. hmmmmm?

money is god's reward

Coming soon:
Art about the above, or
the KKK, or
the government.

-=j

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Sociology of the Fading Signal--Can You Hear Me Now?


and so too...technology is the new opiate of the masses...

-=j

On Thursday, November 20, 2003, at 10:35 AM, mark cooley wrote:

> perhaps implicit within this discussion, but i don't think touched
> upon directly yet, is the discussion of technology and alienation in a
> marxist sense. capitalist political economy (with which we
> participate) demands that we (the professional/political classes at
> least) be multipresent. because by nature the body cannot be located
> in several locations at once (without decapitation at least). we
> substitute our presence with technology (perhaps there could be a
> discussion here on technology as fetish). What happens with
> loss/disturbance of signal is a concrete reminder of our lack of
> presence. unfortunately, rather than questioning a political/economic
> system that puts our bodies into a position of inferiority to
> technology and subservant to a naturalized social order of increasing
> alienation, many instead blame it on the technology - we displace our
> anxiety about our alienation by buying the next big promise of
> "connection" which again reenforces our alienation. This di!
> scussion could involve a more direct reference to the rhetoric of the
> telecommunications industry. There are many television ads that come
> to mind which are meant to sooth consumers into choosing the latest
> telecommunication devices over choosing the presence of body - this
> becomes a moral choice. In the case of an ad depicting a parent at an
> airport (obviously traveling for business) calling in to her/his
> child's gradeschool play and listening over the cell, later declaring
> to the child that (s)he didn't in fact miss the performance - thanks
> to the trusty cell phone. Another, more recent ad, goes much further.
> there's a father, again at an airport on business, talking to his
> daughter who is sitting beside him. someone walks by obscuring our
> view of the father for an instant and when we can see him again it is
> revealed that he is actually speaking to his daughter on his cell.
> Obviously, underlying these ads, is the moral assumption that parental
> presence is necessary (wh!
> ich most would agree with), but the political/economic structures that
> alienate parent from child are completely naturalized. The realities
> of global capital cannot be questioned in such a way that is
> threatening to capital and so thanks to global capital (information
> networks) a parent's cellular presense is just as good as the real
> thing.
>
> i have to stop writing because i have to go to work... or maybe i'll
> just call in and tell the bosses and students that my telepresence is
> just as good as the real thing.
>
> Sean Capone wrote:
>
>> more (this got accidentally posted under the heading The XTC of
>> Communication) :
>>
>> 1) Total Information Loss (TIL) part II: if a signal is basically
>> information, then the types of data we store on our portable devices
>> (phone books, day planners, alarms, location technologies, email etc)
>> ensures the probability of their use. Remember when we used to carry
>> around little phone books of our friends and relatives contact
>> information? Can you even remember anyone's phone # these days besides
>> your own?
>> Bearers of information must have the security of potentiality. Back up
>> your address books, kids.
>>
>> 2) Inadvertant social experiment in action: today as I was playing
>> phone-and-email monkey-in-the-middle while trying to meet a client's
>> deadline, the project mgr's phone rudely switched off its voice
>> capabilities while commuting; for the next hour I was subject to
>> flurries of email & text messages being sent from his phone to the
>> phone of an on-site colleague, who would vocally relay his managerial
>> anxieties. His only role was to provide a front end filter to the
>> client, the subterfuge of which became increasingly complex in an
>> almost sitcom way as the emails, txt msgs, and phone calls
>> exponentially crossed and misfired.
>>
>> 3) Off topic for a minute, I can understand the design convergence of
>> aerodynamically engineered cars and shoes, but why make cell phones
>> look like that too? I suspect that they play off deeply coded cultural
>> signifiers of speed & mobility.
>>
>> 4) More references: "I'm Losing You" by Bruce Wagner (the title refers
>> to the utterance said during imminent signal loss on cells, but of
>> course has deeper symbolic meaning--read the book!); also, Ghost in
>> the Shell graphic novels. Side by side, at their core, these are two
>> very different and beautiful examinations of spirituality and human
>> value as mediated by telecommunications & signal interference.
>>
>> 5) Music: Scanner, Oval, PreFuse 73; we have to consider the aesthetic
>> of hiphop, cliqhop, and IDM-- musical forms which are ecstatic over
>> the corrupt or fragmented signal information in a transmission medium
>> (scratches, pops, CD clicks, phonetic deconstruction). Evocation of
>> nostalgia through the act of disappearing.
>>
>> 6) I ran some of these ideas by the proprietor of a gallery space and
>> plan on revising these ideas into a formal curatorial thesis. Please
>> drop any suggestions my way about artists who are working in any
>> medium that addresses the physical, visual, technological, or
>> metaphorical social spaces engendered by the anxiety--or relief-- of
>> signal disappearance.
>>
>> 7) How could I forget-- Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino. A most
>> wonderful book which, aside from its many complex themes and morals,
>> explores how the clarity of communication--the gradual learning of a
>> language-- hinders the free association and imagination of more
>> symbolic means of story-telling.
>>
>>
>>
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php