Jessica Westbrook
Since 2008
jessica@jessicawestbrook.com
Works in Oak Park, Illinois United States of America

Discussions (0) Opportunities (3) Events (13) Jobs (0)
EVENT

File Type, at Gallery 400, Chicago, USA


Dates:
Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:00 - Sat Jul 30, 2011

Location:
Chicago, Illinois
United States of America

File Type
Curated by Chaz Evans and Lorelei Stewart
June 17 - July 30, 2011
Opening reception: June 17, 5-8pm

Mike Andrews | Jon Cates | Channel TWo (Adam Trowbridge + Jessica Westbrook) | Anthony Discenza | Constant Dullaart | Eric Fleischauer | Patrick Lichty | Ei Jane Janet Lin & Miao Jiaxin | Kristin Lucas | Todd Mattei | Jesse McLean | Chris Meerdo | Casey Reas | Steve Ruiz | Siebren Versteeg

The specificity of work in electronic media warrants investigations that refine categories past “the digital” or “the internet.” File Type is an exhibition which analyzes the cultural character of digital file formats such as the .pdf, .tiff, .jpeg etc. These and many other file types contain narratives that give specific bodies to the often invisible entities that construct electronic culture. Formats and file types represent ways that artwork in digital or internet media create particular standards of representation. What is often regarded as the minutiae of computer science have now become the parameters given to cultural agents. Or to put it in different terms, computer science is now a direct player in the construction of cultural identity, intentionally or not.

File Type explores the kinetic relationships that construct a network of electronic exchange. How have file types worked their way into, or in many cases have become, our cultural metaphors? What are the politics of implied aesthetics hidden within file formats that are regarded as transparent? What are the effects of expediency in using different formats in communication and exchange? Or perhaps most importantly what is the relationship between electronic formats and artistic practices, electronic or otherwise? Are these adjuncts and extensions of artistic practice necessarily a breakage from non-electronic media, or are they possibly fluid and interchangeable?


EVENT

Plausible Artworlds: A Constructed World


Dates:
Tue Oct 26, 2010 00:00 - Tue Oct 26, 2010

Hi Everyone,

This Tuesday is another event in a year-long series of weekly conversations and exhibits in 2010 shedding light on examples of Plausible Artworlds.

This week we’ll be talking with Geoff Lowe, Jacqueline Riva and a half dozen or so other members of A Constructed World.

http://www.aconstructedworld.com/
http://speech2012.blogspot.com/
http://telic.info/node/37

A Constructed World make whatever they make — events, installations, videos, drawings and publications — using the media of not-knowing, idle banter, pamphleteering, live eels, dancing, absences and errors, sleight-of-hand and mistakes. In addition to talking about their projects over the years, which has focused largely on raising the question “what is a group?” collectively, and approaching working with other people as constituting what psychoanalysts call a shared space of “not-knowing”, the group will discuss their recent “Fragments in A Constructed World” project, premised on the hypothesis that there may be a lot of unknown overlaps, or potential points of shared interest between people who aren’t aware of that yet. The project has entailed setting up spaces for dialogue, using fragments of Morse code, Chinese pictograms, telepathy… In fact, this week’s discussion will be an open-ended instantiation of the project, even as the group discusses specific tangible methods and infrastructures which they have set up.

This is of course all very much in the spirit and undefined ambit of Plausible Artworlds, which by design is committed to the idea that all (art)worlds are constructed worlds — yet in both popular and learned parlance to describe a world as “constructed” is not trivially tautological. Why is it that worlds appear invariably natural to those operating in them? Or do we “not-know” they are constructed as a form of knowing? Perhaps this is the key to the experimental epistemology of not-knowing. Who knows? And by extension, who brings what to group making? What form of not-knowing do artists — or other categories of not-knowers — bring to world-construction sites?

See you all then!

Join us every Tuesday night - in person, or on Skype, skypename: ‘basekamp’
If you come to the potluck chat in person, be sure to bring a dish :)
Basekamp space: 723 Chestnut St, 2nd floor, Philadelphia usa

To join this week’s Potluck Chat:

Download from skype.com if you don’t already have it
In Skype “Add a contact”: basekamp
Send a message when you want to join the chat, by selecting us from your list and clicking ‘Start chat’
We’ll add you to the text chat, and when everyone is ready we’ll start the conference call
Follow Plausible Artworlds:
http://twitter.com/basekamp
http://basekamp.com/info

Comment here
http://basekamp.com/about/events/constructed-world#comments

Plausible Artworlds is a project organized by Basekamp and Stephen Wright, and has been funded by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage through the Philadelphia Exhibitions Initiative.


EVENT

Plausible Artworlds : Periferry


Dates:
Tue Oct 19, 2010 00:00 - Tue Oct 19, 2010

Hi Everyone,

This Tuesday is another event in a year-long series of weekly conversations and exhibits in 2010 shedding light on examples of Plausible Artworlds.

This week we’ll be talking with Sonal Jain and Mriganka Madhukaillya of the Desire Machine Collective, who operate the Periferry project, an artist-led space situated on the M. V. Chandardinga, a ferry currently docked along the mighty Brahmaputra River in Guwahati, Assam, in the North East of India.

To describe Periferry as a floating laboratory for generating hybrid practices, while very true, is to skip a little quickly to the point: it is first of all a 1950s era, former government-run ferry barge, entirely river-worthy despite a bit of rust and a half century of plying the somewhat treacherous waters of the Brahmaputra between Assam and West Bengal through Bangladesh. Like the river itself, the space and its activities provide a connective, border-defiant platform for dialogue across artistic, scientific, technological, and ecological modes of production and knowledge. Periferry regularly hosts art-related, on-deck conferences and debates, regular film screenings and is more generally a platform — a floating, diesel-powered and steel platform — for cross-disciplinary flux, exploring new constellations of artistic relationships that challenge traditional hierarchical and autocratic strategies, seeking above all to move away from the center-periphery dialectics to renegotiate the role of local in the global.

Collaborating since 2004 as Desire Machine Collective, Sonal Jain and Mriganka Madhukaillya work through image, moving image, sound, and the time and flux of the river. As their name suggests, Desire Machine seeks to disrupt the neurotic symptoms that arise from constricting capitalist structures — of which the mainstream artworld is merely one instance — with healthier, schizophrenic cultural flows of desire and information.

See you all then!

Join us every Tuesday night - in person, or on Skype, skypename: ‘basekamp’

If you come to the potluck chat in person, be sure to bring a dish :)
Basekamp space: 723 Chestnut St, 2nd floor, Philadelphia usa

To join this week’s Potluck Chat:

• Download from skype.com if you don’t already have it
• In Skype “Add a contact”: basekamp
• Send a message when you want to join the chat, by selecting us from your list and clicking ‘Start chat’
• We’ll add you to the text chat, and when everyone is ready we’ll start the conference call

Follow Plausible Artworlds:
http://twitter.com/basekamp
http://basekamp.com/info


EVENT

Plausible Artworlds : KEIN


Dates:
Tue Oct 12, 2010 00:00 - Tue Oct 12, 2010

Hi Everyone,

This Tuesday is another event in a year-long series of weekly conversations and exhibits in 2010 shedding light on examples of Plausible Artworlds.

This week we’ll be talking with Florian Schneider, one of the founders and administrators of KEIN.ORG, a collaborative networking environment that offers a wide range of internet services to activists and artists, groups and individuals from around the globe.

http://www.kein.org/

KEIN.ORG started in 1997 at Documenta X with the launch of the “no one is illegal” campaign. The group soon set up its own server and developed its own networking infrastructure. The idea of KEIN.ORG is self-supply in terms of networking techniques, operating on a strictly self-authorized and self-organized basis. KEIN.ORG runs eleven servers situated at various locations in Europe and beyond, hosting more than 500 websites, some 200 content management systems and countless mailing lists and email-accounts. A plausible world of plausible worlds, one might venture to say — except that the people at KEIN.ORG would likely point out that this is “KEIN world” — “kein” being the negative indefinite article in German that negates whatever noun follows it (translating as “no” or “none”): the KEIN.ORG website abounds in straight-faced play on the word that they are, featuring “KEIN manifesto”, “KEIN history”, “KEIN community — KEIN.ORG eluding identity by stating it is not what it is. But the word play makes a serious point, as their manifesto points out. It’s short and very much to the point:

“KEIN.ORG implies no organization: No organs, no shared purpose, no common ground, no identity and no feedback.

But rather than a negation KEIN marks the moment of withdrawal, an escape, an indefinite line of flight out of the overcoded structures of networks as formed-matter, of networked economies, of a standardized and controlled production of networked subjectivity.

KEIN is a machine for the production of production. It is asignificant as such: it produces not meaning, but means. But it has itself no means: it is free, free of charges, free of advertisement, free of liability, free of claims, free of complaints, free of duties, free of representation.

KEIN.ORG is about self-authorization, un-organizing and becoming fluid. There is no staff and there are no assets. But there are lots of links, connections, and conjunctions to be made.”

See you all then!

Join us every Tuesday night - in person, or on Skype, skypename: ‘basekamp’
If you come to the potluck chat in person, be sure to bring a dish :)
Basekamp space: 723 Chestnut St, 2nd floor, Philadelphia usa

To join this week’s Potluck Chat:

Download from skype.com if you don’t already have it
In Skype “Add a contact”: basekamp
Send a message when you want to join the chat, by selecting us from your list and clicking ‘Start chat’
We’ll add you to the text chat, and when everyone is ready we’ll start the conference call


EVENT

Plausible Artworlds : Internacional Errorista


Dates:
Tue Sep 14, 2010 00:00 - Tue Sep 14, 2010

Hi Everyone,

This Tuesday is another event in a year-long series of weekly conversations and exhibits in 2010 shedding light on examples of Plausible Artworlds.

This week we’ll be talking with Federico Zukerfeld and Loreto Garin, two of the co-founders of the Internacional Errorista.

International Errorism was born fortuitously in 2005 when a bunch of artists and activists in Buenos Aires, planning to protest the visit of George W. Bush to Argentina, meant to google “terrorism” but mistakenly forgot the “t” and typed in “errorism”… At the time, that error yielded zero hits; it is some measure of the group’s success (or error) that today it elicits over 300,000! With their hybrid blend of carnivalesque street art and savvy, corrosive political analysis, the group hunts down and exposes the errors that pollute our global public sphere, which the powers-that-be generally try to fob off as “the Truth”.

Indeed, errorism is a full-fledged if highly heretic philosophy — one that stands opposed to the “verism” that informs virtually all other modes of thought and human endeavor. For rather than being based on a quest for an elusive “truth”, it sees error as the founding principle of life: errare humanum est! How wrong could that be?! Proceeding by trial, but more generally by error, they claim in their manifesto that “we are all errorists:”

Errorism : Concept and action are based on the idea that “error” is reality’s principle of order. Errorism is a philosophically erroneous position, a ritual of negation, a disorganized organization: failure as perfection, error as appropriate move. The field of action of “Errorism” contains all those practices that aim at the LIBERATION of the human being and language. Confusion and surprise, black humour and absurdity are the favorite tools of the errorists. Lapses and failed acts are an errorist delight. The movement itself emerged from an earlier collective called Etcetera, but has gone global! Is error a plausible (art)world?

See you all then!

Join us every Tuesday night - in person, or on Skype, skypename: ‘basekamp’
If you come to the potluck chat in person, be sure to bring a dish :)
Basekamp space: 723 Chestnut St, 2nd floor, Philadelphia usa

To join this week’s Potluck Chat:

Download from skype.com if you don’t already have it
In Skype “Add a contact”: basekamp
Send a message when you want to join the chat, by selecting us from your list and clicking ‘Start chat’ We’ll add you to the text chat, and when everyone is ready we’ll start the conference call
Follow Plausible Artworlds:
http://twitter.com/basekamp
http://basekamp.com/info

Comment here
http://basekamp.com/about/events/internacional-errorista#comments

Plausible Artworlds is a project organized by Basekamp and Stephen Wright, and has been funded by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage through the Philadelphia Exhibitions Initiative.