Jason Van Anden
Since 2004
Works in Brooklyn, New York United States of America

PORTFOLIO (2)
BIO
Jason Van Anden is a new media activist, artist, inventor and robot maker. His creations are exhibited internationally, receiving recognition in the art, science, technology and gaming communities. More about Jason and his work can be found at his website www.smileproject.com.
Discussions (224) Opportunities (1) Events (4) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Jason Van Anden @ Front Room Gallery


Hi All,

I recently completed a new piece called Endless Love for an exhibit at Front Room Gallery called Multiples and Editions. This exhibit presents some super works which together define a modern perspective of what a multiple or edition is. Endless Love will be exhibited both online and projected in the gallery. The opening is this Friday night.

Press Release follows:

Endless Love - Front Room Multiples and Editions
Jan. 19 - Feb. 11, 2007
Reception: Fri., Jan. 19, 7-9
Gallery hours: Fri-Sun 1-6
http://www.frontroom.org

Endless Love is a series of emotive digital artworks that loop forever
in a reasonable yet unpredictable manner. The series contains 500 variations, each stored on a signed and numbered CD available for purchase online or at Front Room.

Endless Love was created for a group exhibition at Front Room gallery called "Multiples and Editions". The opening reception is Friday night, details follow. This new art will be exhibited online as well as at the gallery.

Endless Love Online: http://www.frontroom.org/endlesslove
Purchase Online: http://frontroom.org/editions/agora.cgi?cart_ide86522.6833*py6l23&&p_id017&xm=on&ppincTHtail

Front Room Gallery Information: http://www.frontroom.org
Gallery Press Release: http://frontroom.org/mnepress.htm

Best,
Jason Van Anden
www.smileproject.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Graphics with Python: wxPython vs. tkinter vs. PyCairo vs. PyX vs ...


I love python, its a wonderful language ... careful with the graphics
tho, especially because if you want things to be OS neutral. This
was my experience a few years ago at any rate. Most of the libraries
work well with Windows (again, a few years ago but...). pyGame does
not rely on OS objects like buttons, etc ... so I gravitated towards
this for my python graphics expeditions. Another issue I was never
clear about was how to compile Python to run standalone as an exe,
without requiring the user to manually install all sorts of libraries
on their own.

I have settled on a strategy of using Java for the front end and
Python for server side. Farklempt! was written this way. So are
Neil and Iona.

IMHO, if you are just learning how to program, Python is instantly
gratifying and will be useful for a variety of things ongoing. If
you want to create applications with an excellent graphics that is
OS Neutral, then Java is the place to focus. (plus, you can run your
Java app as an applet in a browser!)

Jason Van Anden
www.smileproejct.com

On Jan 17, 2007, at 1:55 AM, Vijay Pattisapu wrote:

> Hi Rhizome
>
> I've recently started using Python. Rhizomers, what is your favorite
> Python graphics library and why?
>
> For 2D?
>
> For 3D?
>
> Thanks
> -Vijay
>
> --
> 3506 Speedway
> Austin, TX 78705
> Cell: (469)877-9166
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/
> subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/
> 29.php

Jason Van Anden

The Smile Project
149 Prospect Park SW, Studio 5
Brooklyn, NY 11218

www.smileproject.com
718.388.5063

DISCUSSION

Joywar in Harpers


Hi All,

Page 53 of the Feb 2007 issues of Harpers has an excellent article by
our own Joy Garnett and the photographer of Molotov Man ... Susan
Meiselas. Rhizome is mentioned prominently as are the better halves
of MTAA.

Pleasant surprise - great read - check it out - yea!

Molotov! ;)
Jason Van Anden
www.smileproject.com

DISCUSSION

Re: new media smelt down


A followup to my last post (as I am sitting here alone in my post
studio studio wrapping up a new digital artwork for an upcoming
affordable art exhibit). If I were to choose three artists whose
work I am most influenced by (in spirit at any rate), they would all
be modernist painters: Klee, Morandi and Dubuffet.

j

On Jan 12, 2007, at 9:30 AM, Jason Van Anden wrote:

> Art is an institution based upon perceived value - for the most
> part it is an elitist hobby defined by the leisure classes. The
> relationship between the artist and the collector is a dance of
> actualization - the artist attempts to fulfill a wish to be
> witnessed, the collector wishes to actualize themselves by
> possessing art. Old media is easy to possess ... plus it has a
> long sexy back story and thus it is more in demand and thus it is
> worth more and thus it is better supported and so it goes. New
> media (digital work?) ... not so much history ... plus it seems to
> violate the possession part of the contract.
>
> I suspect with time this will work itself out - and some of the
> ArtBase work will seem more significant, eventually.
>
> Like Annie, I am curious about what you like from the last 12 years.
>
> Jason Van Anden
> www.smileproject.com
>
>
> On Jan 12, 2007, at 7:25 AM, anniea wrote:
>
>> dear Eric
>>
>> Could you name these significant paintings, photos and
>> installations made in the last 12 years?
>>
>> Opening the doors to self publishing and networked visual
>> expression might not have produced great images and text (but
>> that's in for discussion also), but it has produced new
>> communication spaces and very significant volatile interactions.
>> It is contributing every day to giving people air in a totally by
>> economics determined world, that only interacts with them on a
>> customized base and accustoms them to being treated as databases.
>>
>> Eric, if you want me to take you serious, you should start to give
>> precise critics on works you don't think meeting the standards you
>> would like to use.
>>
>> yours Annie
>>
>> On 1/12/07, dymond@idirect.ca <dymond@idirect.ca> wrote: Why is
>> New Media Art so insignificant?
>> I have been going over the last 12 years of New Media
>> works trying to find a significant work of art and I
>> have come up empty. Not lost however, and that is a positive
>> thing. This
>> failure isn't true of Painting, Photography,
>> Installation Art. Those media have all produced
>> memorable works.
>> Film and Video have flourished as well ( I think that
>> helps explain the flood of videos by new media
>> artists), but the use of new media for visual
>> expression is sadly on the last bench of the stadium.
>> Even the so-called success of electronic literature
>> pales when compared with the interesting work created
>> in the printed media.
>> Why?
>> It doesn't make sense at first.
>> Opening the doors to self publishing and networked
>> visual expression should have produced great images and
>> text by now, but it hasn't.
>> Whats wrong?
>> I think there is a strange attractor act work here.
>> Works that go through the pain and prejudice of the
>> existing mandated mechanisms actually come out the better for it.
>> There is rigor and self-criticism that is sorely
>> lacking in networked publishing and visual expression in
>> *communities*.
>> For me to acknowledge this is blasphemy in many ways.
>> I was an early proponent of the creative commons (see
>> Leonardo, Vol. 31, No. 4 (1998), pp. 297-298).
>> Is a culture important when it concerns
>> itself with determining what works contain quality and depth and
>> operate
>> as a necessary filter to keep out those works that deserve to
>> fail? Well,
>> no more lazy art. No More easy graphics.
>> If New Media wants to grow up, then it has to set some
>> rigorous standards and demand that the work ACTUALLY be
>> culturally significant on a broad scale. Self indulgence is fun,
>> but it's
>> lazy and middling, and stupid.
>> My avatar died last month, send condolences to Dymes Mulberry on
>> Second
>> Life. Eric
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> 17-24 Jan. "wat is angst, waarom bang zijn, waarvoor vrezen" and
>> a new version of "rassur" for "Oog" the internet art page of "de
>> Volkskrant", a Dutch national news paper. http://
>> extra.volkskrant.nl/oog

DISCUSSION

new media smelt down


Art is an institution based upon perceived value - for the most part
it is an elitist hobby defined by the leisure classes. The
relationship between the artist and the collector is a dance of
actualization - the artist attempts to fulfill a wish to be
witnessed, the collector wishes to actualize themselves by possessing
art. Old media is easy to possess ... plus it has a long sexy back
story and thus it is more in demand and thus it is worth more and
thus it is better supported and so it goes. New media (digital
work?) ... not so much history ... plus it seems to violate the
possession part of the contract.

I suspect with time this will work itself out - and some of the
ArtBase work will seem more significant, eventually.

Like Annie, I am curious about what you like from the last 12 years.

Jason Van Anden
www.smileproject.com

On Jan 12, 2007, at 7:25 AM, anniea wrote:

> dear Eric
>
> Could you name these significant paintings, photos and
> installations made in the last 12 years?
>
> Opening the doors to self publishing and networked visual
> expression might not have produced great images and text (but
> that's in for discussion also), but it has produced new
> communication spaces and very significant volatile interactions. It
> is contributing every day to giving people air in a totally by
> economics determined world, that only interacts with them on a
> customized base and accustoms them to being treated as databases.
>
> Eric, if you want me to take you serious, you should start to give
> precise critics on works you don't think meeting the standards you
> would like to use.
>
> yours Annie
>
> On 1/12/07, dymond@idirect.ca <dymond@idirect.ca> wrote: Why is New
> Media Art so insignificant?
> I have been going over the last 12 years of New Media
> works trying to find a significant work of art and I
> have come up empty. Not lost however, and that is a positive thing.
> This
> failure isn't true of Painting, Photography,
> Installation Art. Those media have all produced
> memorable works.
> Film and Video have flourished as well ( I think that
> helps explain the flood of videos by new media
> artists), but the use of new media for visual
> expression is sadly on the last bench of the stadium.
> Even the so-called success of electronic literature
> pales when compared with the interesting work created
> in the printed media.
> Why?
> It doesn't make sense at first.
> Opening the doors to self publishing and networked
> visual expression should have produced great images and
> text by now, but it hasn't.
> Whats wrong?
> I think there is a strange attractor act work here.
> Works that go through the pain and prejudice of the
> existing mandated mechanisms actually come out the better for it.
> There is rigor and self-criticism that is sorely
> lacking in networked publishing and visual expression in
> *communities*.
> For me to acknowledge this is blasphemy in many ways.
> I was an early proponent of the creative commons (see
> Leonardo, Vol. 31, No. 4 (1998), pp. 297-298).
> Is a culture important when it concerns
> itself with determining what works contain quality and depth and
> operate
> as a necessary filter to keep out those works that deserve to fail?
> Well,
> no more lazy art. No More easy graphics.
> If New Media wants to grow up, then it has to set some
> rigorous standards and demand that the work ACTUALLY be
> culturally significant on a broad scale. Self indulgence is fun,
> but it's
> lazy and middling, and stupid.
> My avatar died last month, send condolences to Dymes Mulberry on
> Second
> Life. Eric
>
>
>
>
> --
> 17-24 Jan. "wat is angst, waarom bang zijn, waarvoor vrezen" and a
> new version of "rassur" for "Oog" the internet art page of "de
> Volkskrant", a Dutch national news paper. http://
> extra.volkskrant.nl/oog