Jason Van Anden
Since 2004
Works in Brooklyn, New York United States of America

PORTFOLIO (2)
BIO
Jason Van Anden is a new media activist, artist, inventor and robot maker. His creations are exhibited internationally, receiving recognition in the art, science, technology and gaming communities. More about Jason and his work can be found at his website www.smileproject.com.
Discussions (224) Opportunities (1) Events (4) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: Patrick May to be the next Director of Technology


welcome and good luck!
j
On 1/26/06, Francis Hwang <francis@rhizome.org> wrote:> Hi everybody,>> Last November, I notified the Rhizome community that I would soon be> stepping down as Rhizome's Director of Technology. Today, I'm very> happy to announce that our next Director of Technology will be Patrick> May.>> Patrick comes to Rhizome with an exceptional background in both> technology and in the arts. His previous position at the publishing> company Source Media gives him extensive experience with developing and> maintaining large, content-driven sites with limited resources, and> this experience will come in handy at a highly dynamic,> community-oriented website like Rhizome. He is also active in the free> software and Ruby communities: He is the creator of the Ruby-Web> library, and has presented at the International Ruby Conference.>> Patrick is also the cofounder and Director of Programming at the> Williamsburg-based artists' collective Open Ground, helping to guide> the consensus-based curatorial process that furnished Grand Street with> four years' worth of always surprising group shows. He is an artist> himself, and his creative practice incorporates a software library he> created that automatically publishes consecutive iterations of images> to an artists' blog; he discussed this tool at Rhizome's second> "Blogging and the Arts" panel discussion.>> Being Rhizome's Director of Technology, of course, requires more than> just a knowledge of programming, and more than a familiarity with new> media arts. Rhizome has always been an undersized organization with> oversized ambitions, and we continue to explore ways to deepen the> nascent connections between art and technology. Patrick's resume hits a> lot of the right topics, but what's most important is that he's able to> think of the big picture--not just in terms of artworks and lines of> code, but also in terms of organizations and communities. I'm confident> that he will make the perfect partner for Lauren and Marisa as the> three of them lead Rhizome in the future. We've accomplished a lot in> the last year, and I'm excited to see what changes will come in the> years ahead.>> We are expecting the transition process to work like this: Patrick will> come in on February 2nd, and he and I will work side-by-side throughout> February as I train him in. My last day will be March 3rd, but even> after then I'll still be available to Patrick & the organization in> general.>> I'm quite happy to leave this job in Patrick's capable hands. I hope> you all welcome him as kindly as you welcomed me.>> Francis Hwang> Director of Technology> Rhizome.org> phone: 212-219-1288x202> AIM: francisrhizome> + + +>> +> -> post: list@rhizome.org> -> questions: info@rhizome.org> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> +> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php>

--Jason Van Andenhttp://www.smileproject.com

DISCUSSION

Re: draw-something


I like draw-something as well. The shapes are flat - but strangely expressive.
The freestyle site looks a bit like open source Fractal Painter -which I always liked while being somewhat confused by what to actuallydo with it.
Creating computer art that emulates old media becomes realist to me ina funny way - I tend to perceive it as a portrait of the media itsimulates rather than the image itself.
jason van anden

On 1/11/06, Pall Thayer <p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca> wrote:> Hi Rob,> I was looking at this and find it interesting. Thanks for sharing the> code with us. There are a couple of questions that come to mind. I'd> like to know if you have any plans of making the lines more "pencil"-> like by creating a more expressive line. I feel this is an issue that> has been largely overlooked by people working with automated drawing> processes. They tend to look really flat and dead because of it.> AARON, for instance, suffers from a severe case of flatness that> could be easily cured by some simple, maybe even random, variation in> line thickness and length. There's an interesting project called> Freestyle that's working on this (among other things) at http://> freestyle.sourceforge.net/index.php (source available).>> Also, I noticed this on your blog:> "The shapes are random. The colours are random. At worst I'm showing> one in every three of these images.>> Randomness gives good results far more often than it should. Is it> the heuristics I'm coding in, or is aesthetics really random?>> Time to start adding rules.">> I think it has to do with the range of data. Random is going to use> the whole range of data equally whereas something like weather is> going to be concentrated in predictable area's of the full range.> Personally, I think it's really interesting to see what happens with> different types of data. If you experiment with different data> sources, I think you'll find that they each have their own> significant character which could in turn be interesting to mix> together.>> Pall>> On 10.1.2006, at 18:56, Rob Myers wrote:>> > I have been working on my program draw-something.> >> > There's a Flash version (made with MTASC):> >> > http://draw-something.robmyers.org/> >> > And the Lisp version now makes multiple figures and coloured figures:> >> > http://www.robmyers.org/weblog/2006/01/11/purely-random-colour/> > http://www.robmyers.org/weblog/2006/01/08/draw-something-drawing/> > http://www.robmyers.org/weblog/2006/01/08/a-change-of-algorithm-for-> > draw-something/> >> > Source for all versions available from sourceforge CVS along with> > some recent release bundles:> >> > http:://rob-art.sourceforge.net/> >> > - Rob.> > +> > -> post: list@rhizome.org> > -> questions: info@rhizome.org> > -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/> > subscribe.rhiz> > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> > +> > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> > Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/> > 29.php> >>>>> --> Pall Thayer> p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca> http://www.this.is/pallit>>>>>> +> -> post: list@rhizome.org> -> questions: info@rhizome.org> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> +> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php>

--Jason Van Andenhttp://www.smileproject.com


DISCUSSION

Re: NYT art critic reviews Pixar exhibition at MoMA


Hey t.
I thought that the "relevant thing for some in this forum to consider"was whether we are making Visual Culture instead of Visual Art.
No?
Jason

On 12/16/05, T.Whid <twhid@twhid.com> wrote:> On 12/16/05, Jason Van Anden <robotissues@gmail.com> wrote:> > What would Jackson do?> >> > There are so many artists making so many different things that I have> > to wonder if the original comment addresses artists at all.> >> > Based upon an abstract definition of what Murphy is calling Visual Art> > (VA) and Visual Culture (VC), I suspect that if anyone is to blame, it> > is the collectors (consumers) rather than the artists. To say> > otherwise suggests that there are a finite of artists in the world at> > any point in time endowned with super hero art skills - and that these> > super talented few have opted to waste their talent making Visual> > Culture instead of Visual Art.>> I'm not really following this arg -- I don't see how it follows that> it's not the artists fault if they choose to spend their talents at> Pixar as opposed to PS1.>> I think what Murphy meant was that, in art, one usually assumes that> the artist is trying to create an entire package of form, subject and> content (i know, i know -- hopelessly modernist definition of art).> Whereas, in visual culture, most practitioners are consumed with the> form (or technique). Pixar is a great example. As far as 3D> representations of form go they are extremely far advanced -- way> beyond any individual artists working today. But their subject and> content -- tho entertaining -- doesn't attempt a sophistication or> critical awareness that one would presume to find in art.>> Murphy was suggesting that a lot of art out there these days may have> the same issue, but since it purports to be art, it's a problem. Pixar> doesn't have a problem because they don't pretend to make art, they're> just damn good entertainers.>> >> > If Jackson Pollack was embarking on a career in the arts today -> > would he opt to manufacture well presented one liners instead of> > making expressive paintings?> >> > Jason Van Anden> > www.smileproject.com> >> >> > On 12/16/05, T.Whid <twhid@twhid.com> wrote:> > > Perhaps I should have said it's relevant for all of us to consider...> > >> > > On 12/16/05, Jason Van Anden <jason@smileproject.com> wrote:> > > > > ...a relevant thing for some in this forum to consider.> > > >> > > > who? example?> > > >> > > > jason> > > >> > > > On 12/16/05, T.Whid <twhid@twhid.com> wrote:> > > > > http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/16/arts/design/16pixa.html> > > > >> > > > > Murphy posted on Thingist this quote:> > > > >> > > > > "Still, there is much to see in the show, and if a lot of it is more> > > > > visual culture than art, much less great art, the focus is in accord> > > > > with the museum's long tradition of attention to all kinds of visual> > > > > disciplines, especially design."> > > > >> > > > > To which he added this commentary:> > > > >> > > > > "Yeah, most of what passes for Visual Art these days is Visual> > > > > Culture. A totally respectable field of study but it's not art. What> > > > > the two share is Design."> > > > >> > > > > ...a relevant thing for some in this forum to consider.> > > > >> > > > > --> > > > > <twhid>www.mteww.com</twhid>> > > > >> > > > > +> > > > > -> post: list@rhizome.org> > > > > -> questions: info@rhizome.org> > > > > -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz> > > > > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> > > > > +> > > > > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> > > > > Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php> > > > >> > > >> > > >> > > > --> > > > Jason Van Anden> > > > http://www.smileproject.com> > > >> > >> > >> > > --> > > <twhid>www.mteww.com</twhid>> > >> > > +> > > -> post: list@rhizome.org> > > -> questions: info@rhizome.org> > > -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz> > > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> > > +> > > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> > > Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php> > >> >> >> > --> > Jason Van Anden> > http://www.smileproject.com> >>>> --> <twhid>www.mteww.com</twhid>

DISCUSSION

Re: spacer.gif{ART}


This looks strangely like www.softwareartspace.com.
If this isn't a very well done parody - I claim prior art.
see: http://www.smileproject.com/images/dot.gif
j

On 12/15/05, mark cooley <flawedart@yahoo.com> wrote:> http://spacergifart.com>> Obsolescence meets timelessness in new Art form.>> What is a "spacer.gif"?> The spacer.gif is a means, employed by web designers, of keeping table based layouts from collapsing in on themselves. The spacer.gif was once a valuable tool in a net world governed by the interdependence of content and layout. However, to the contemporary high-efficiency web designer, who employs css formatting and layout capabilities, spacer gifs are largely an obsolete and unnecessary tool. The independence of content from layout has come, and spacer gifs, as a concept and as digital objects, are disappearing.>> What is spacer.gif{ART}?> As the digital culture industry forges on to virtual territories yet unseen, spacer.gif{ART} hopes to salvage small pieces of the wreckage left behind. spacer.gif{ART} produces and distributes limited edition archival prints of spacer.gif image files downloaded directly from the web by our highly skilled team of curators and techno-conservators. Our portfolio collections represent a dying breed of often unknown artists who utilize(d) the tools of a rapidly fading past to create extraordinary table-based web design experiences. Our curatorial staff hand picks the most extraordinary examples of the spacer.gif to offer to you, our patron, as handsome limited edition archival prints.>> We plan on offering a range of newly discovered works and will be limiting the amount of prints produced and sold. There will only be 10 copies each print portfolio printed. 10 additional individual prints will be made of each piece for patrons interested in collecting individual works or assembling custom portfolios from individual works. Once the final prints have been made, all spacer.gif files will be permanently deleted from our hard drives.>> http://spacergifart.com> +> -> post: list@rhizome.org> -> questions: info@rhizome.org> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> +> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php>

--Jason Van Andenhttp://www.smileproject.com