Jason Van Anden
Since 2004
Works in Brooklyn, New York United States of America

PORTFOLIO (2)
BIO
Jason Van Anden is a new media activist, artist, inventor and robot maker. His creations are exhibited internationally, receiving recognition in the art, science, technology and gaming communities. More about Jason and his work can be found at his website www.smileproject.com.
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DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: AJAX for artists


Lewis - how so?
(super weird gmail garbling of my last post -ack!)
Jason

On 2/6/06, Lewis LaCook <llacook@yahoo.com> wrote:> well, once we start using a protocol more suited to network transmissions as> networks are NOW all of this will be moot-->>> lol>>>>>>>>>> Jason Van Anden <jason@smileproject.com> wrote:> Programmers tend to be skeptical of trendy new technologies,especially after> having invested so much time becoming expert in oneonly to be told it's> become obsolete. I suspect thatartist/programmers even more so, in that we> want to quickly create thethings we imagine, and the overhead of coding> often requires an bigdown payment.> I think this is the reason that Eric is emphasising the importance ofthis> particular technology (and also why some seem so hesitant).> There are many ways to do what AJAX does - and in that sense it isn'tnew.> Some of the reasons its so cool is:> 1.) its neat (clean, easy, elegant, efficient, etc...). It humanreadability> makes it a joy to code.> 2.) it has community support (unlike SOAP which I think did notcapture the> hearts of programmers because of its MS-centric syntax).Assuming> code/knowledge is being shared, this eliminates some of theoverhead> mentioned above.> 3.) it can drastically improve the user experience. At this point itworks on> most any browser so its easy to use and it allows for a moreefficient use of> bandwidth since it can significantly reduce thenumber of round trips and> amount of data being passed between theclient and server.> Fellow programmers, write this down, AJAX rocks, learn it an you willnot be> sorry.> More about it> here:http://www.adaptivepath.com/publications/essays/archives/000385.php> A very simple example of AJAX can be seen in my first foray into artwith a> political agenda called "Tax the Rich!" (link below). As faras I can tell> its the only "net art" piece of the bunch, but I'mafraid this is not a> compelling enough reason for people to view itover some of the sillier> entries.> http://tax.cf.huffingtonpost.com> Jason Van Anden>>> On 2/5/06, Pall Thayer>> wrote:> It's not necessarily about 'new' functionality per se. It's more>> about the user experience. It's about dynamic content in a seamless> and> invisible way. It's only what you need when you need it. When you> get a> table containing 500 elements, you don't need elements 200 to> 300 till you> scroll down. Of course, we could display the first 100> elements and then at> the bottom of the page is a 'next' link that> takes you to the next 100. But> let's say I'm on page 3 and I want to> go back and see item 78. The old way,> I go to the bottom of the page> and click on previous, and again, and then> locate 78. With AJAX, I> simply scroll back up (using two fingers on my> trackpad, which> incidentally isn't 'new' functionality either, just a> better, more> intuitive user experience. If you haven't tried it, it's> better than> it sounds). Try comparing google maps and mapquest and tell us> which> one "feels" better.>> Pall>> On 5.2.200!> 6, at 15:12, judson wrote:>> > true. but why is that particularly> important. either way, the> > client pushes a button and gets a result. if> that result is> > processed on the server or on their machine, there isn't> much> > difference to them. most users would never know, and certainly> >> none would ever care, if there's no benefit other than client side/> >> server side in and of itself.> >> > which is pretty much my point.> client-side technology is generally> > viewed as being more accessible, but> really it's mostly hype, and> > often no significant improvement or> simplification over server-side.> >> >> > On Feb 5, 2006, at 12:36 PM, Pall> Thayer wrote:> >> >> No. Once the page is at the clients end,> PHP/Perl/whatever, isn't> >> doing anything.> >>> >> On 5.2.2006, at 11:36,> Plasma Studii wrote:> >>> >>> you can do the very same thing with PHP (or> Perl 10+ years ago).> >>> Ajax, Perl etc still read the whole page, but can> be told to load> >>> only part of it?> >>>> >>>>!> >>>> >>>> >>> Pall Thayer wrote:> >>>> >>>> I think you're m!> issing t> he point. It's not the ability to read or> >>>> write data to the server but> the ability to do so in a way that> >>>> doesn't require reloading the> entire page. Lets say person A in> >>>> Arkansas does something on the page> that rewrites the data in your> >>>> anything.txt file. Person B in Botswana> isn't going to see those> >>>> changes unless they reload the page. AJAX> lets you do the reloading> >>>> in the background. Probably the best use of> AJAX to this day, and> >>>> almost certainly a contributing factor to it's> renewed rise to> >>>> stardom (it's been around for a while) is Google maps.> It has> >>>> revolutionized the way maps are presented on the web. The> interface> >>>> is absolutely brilliant and a huge leap away from the old> method of> >>>> clicking on N, E, S or W to reload an image.> >>>>> >>>>> Palli> >>>>> >>>> On 5.2.2006, at 10:09, Plasma Studii wrote:> >>>>> >>>>>>> You will need to add the xmlrpc classes to your classpath, but> >>>>>> thats> trivial.> >>>>>>!> >>>>>> >>>>> hey eric,> >>>>>> >>>>> probably, i'm just not getting this,> but seems like the same> >>>>> result> >>>>> >>>>> would be SO much easier> with PHP? PHP is super clear, whereas> >>>>> Ajax> >>>>> >>>>> just isn't at> all. It's kinda the diff between intuitive and> >>>>> memorized. most folks> don't even notice how much they memorize(as> >>>>> opposed to understand),> but a lot seem like just arbitrary steps.> >>>>> sorta why reading/writing C> is actually FAR more intuitively> >>>>> comprehensible (though compilers are> usually convoluted) than> >>>>> anything in Flash.> >>>>>> >>>>> the steps> to write to a file (any file on the web, not just> >>>>> XML) in> >>>>>> >>>>> PHP are clear. seems it would be a lot more "available to> >>>>>> artists"? is there some perk i'm missing here? Seems like> >>>>> bafflingly> convoluted MS design?> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>> $FileOpen = fopen( "anything.txt", "w" ); // specify file to write> >>>> to>> >>>>>!> if ( $FileOpen ) {> >>>>> fwrite( $FileOpen, "write whateve!> r you wa> nt, including HTML, XML> >>>>> or javascript code" );> >>>>> }> >>>>>> >>>>>> ?>> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>> that's ALL the code it takes!> >>>>>> >>>>> upload> it to a server running php (and about all of em do) this> >>>>> shows up on> the page (or it's included with osX, a download, etc).> >>>>> >>>>> the code> doesn't. if the page doesn't exist, it'll create it> >>>>> (though there's> also a file_exists() function you can use if you> >>>>> don't want that to> happen) the php could go absolutely> >>>>> anywhere on> >>>>> >>>>> your> HTML page. just name it x.php instead of x.html. it's> >>>>> designed with> the coder in mind, not the code (which is why i say> >>>>> an MS thing, they> seem to be incapable of thinking any way but> >>>>> from> >>>>> >>>>> their> own perspective)> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>> reminds me of depreciating the tag.> what possible> >>>>> improvement could you make by replacing it?! if it's> off by a> >>>>> pixel one in a thousand times, who cares?! (Web desig!> n just isn't> >>>>> print design and CSS and XHTML are just blatantly dumb> code> >>>>> design) the tag is well worth it just because it works so> clearly> >>>>> and without memorizing. Design utility extends to a lot more> than> >>>>> just Italian coffee makers and German cars. Code is another>> >>>>> appliance.> >>>>> +> >>>>> -> post: list@rhizome.org> >>>>> ->> questions: info@rhizome.org> >>>>> -> subscribe/unsubscribe:> http://rhizome.org/preferences/> >>>>> subscribe.rhiz> >>>>> -> give:> http://rhizome.org/support> >>>>> +> >>>>> Subscribers to Rhizome are> subject to the terms set out in the> >>>>> Membership Agreement available> online at http://rhizome.org/info/> >>>>> 29.php> >>>>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>>> >>>> --> >>>> Pall Thayer> >>>> p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca> >>>>> http://www.this.is/pallit> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>> +> >>> -> post:> list@rhizome.org> >>> -> questions: info@rhizome.org> >>> ->> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/> >>> subscribe.rhiz>> !> >>> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> >>> +> >>> Subscriber!> s to Rhi> zome are subject to the terms set out in the> >>> Membership Agreement> available online at http://rhizome.org/info/> >>> 29.php> >>>> >>> >>> >>>> >> --> >> Pall Thayer> >> p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca> >>> http://www.this.is/pallit> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>>>> --> Pall Thayer>> p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca> http://www.this.is/pallit>>>>> +> -> post:> list@rhizome.org> -> questions: info@rhizome.org> -> subscribe/unsubscribe:> http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz> -> give:> http://rhizome.org/support> +> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the> terms set out in the> Membership Agreement available online at> http://rhizome.org/info/29.php>>> --Jason Van Andenhttp://www.smileproject.com> +> -> post: list@rhizome.org> -> questions: info@rhizome.org> -> subscribe/unsubscribe:> http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> +> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php>>>> ***************************************************************************>>> ||http://www.lewislacook.org||> sign up now! poetry, code, forums, blogs, newsfeeds...>>> ________________________________>> What are the most popular cars? Find out at Yahoo! Autos>>

--Jason Van Andenhttp://www.smileproject.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: AJAX for artists


Programmers tend to be skeptical of trendy new technologies,especially after having invested so much time becoming expert in oneonly to be told it's become obsolete. I suspect thatartist/programmers even more so, in that we want to quickly create thethings we imagine, and the overhead of coding often requires an bigdown payment.
I think this is the reason that Eric is emphasising the importance ofthis particular technology (and also why some seem so hesitant).
There are many ways to do what AJAX does - and in that sense it isn'tnew. Some of the reasons its so cool is:
1.) its neat (clean, easy, elegant, efficient, etc...). It humanreadability makes it a joy to code.
2.) it has community support (unlike SOAP which I think did notcapture the hearts of programmers because of its MS-centric syntax).Assuming code/knowledge is being shared, this eliminates some of theoverhead mentioned above.
3.) it can drastically improve the user experience. At this point itworks on most any browser so its easy to use and it allows for a moreefficient use of bandwidth since it can significantly reduce thenumber of round trips and amount of data being passed between theclient and server.
Fellow programmers, write this down, AJAX rocks, learn it an you willnot be sorry.
More about it here:http://www.adaptivepath.com/publications/essays/archives/000385.php
A very simple example of AJAX can be seen in my first foray into artwith a political agenda called "Tax the Rich!" (link below). As faras I can tell its the only "net art" piece of the bunch, but I'mafraid this is not a compelling enough reason for people to view itover some of the sillier entries.
http://tax.cf.huffingtonpost.com
Jason Van Anden

On 2/5/06, Pall Thayer <p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca> wrote:> It's not necessarily about 'new' functionality per se. It's more> about the user experience. It's about dynamic content in a seamless> and invisible way. It's only what you need when you need it. When you> get a table containing 500 elements, you don't need elements 200 to> 300 till you scroll down. Of course, we could display the first 100> elements and then at the bottom of the page is a 'next' link that> takes you to the next 100. But let's say I'm on page 3 and I want to> go back and see item 78. The old way, I go to the bottom of the page> and click on previous, and again, and then locate 78. With AJAX, I> simply scroll back up (using two fingers on my trackpad, which> incidentally isn't 'new' functionality either, just a better, more> intuitive user experience. If you haven't tried it, it's better than> it sounds). Try comparing google maps and mapquest and tell us which> one "feels" better.>> Pall>> On 5.2.2006, at 15:12, judson wrote:>> > true. but why is that particularly important. either way, the> > client pushes a button and gets a result. if that result is> > processed on the server or on their machine, there isn't much> > difference to them. most users would never know, and certainly> > none would ever care, if there's no benefit other than client side/> > server side in and of itself.> >> > which is pretty much my point. client-side technology is generally> > viewed as being more accessible, but really it's mostly hype, and> > often no significant improvement or simplification over server-side.> >> >> > On Feb 5, 2006, at 12:36 PM, Pall Thayer wrote:> >> >> No. Once the page is at the clients end, PHP/Perl/whatever, isn't> >> doing anything.> >>> >> On 5.2.2006, at 11:36, Plasma Studii wrote:> >>> >>> you can do the very same thing with PHP (or Perl 10+ years ago).> >>> Ajax, Perl etc still read the whole page, but can be told to load> >>> only part of it?> >>>> >>>> >>>> >>>> >>> Pall Thayer wrote:> >>>> >>>> I think you're missing the point. It's not the ability to read or> >>>> write data to the server but the ability to do so in a way that> >>>> doesn't require reloading the entire page. Lets say person A in> >>>> Arkansas does something on the page that rewrites the data in your> >>>> anything.txt file. Person B in Botswana isn't going to see those> >>>> changes unless they reload the page. AJAX lets you do the reloading> >>>> in the background. Probably the best use of AJAX to this day, and> >>>> almost certainly a contributing factor to it's renewed rise to> >>>> stardom (it's been around for a while) is Google maps. It has> >>>> revolutionized the way maps are presented on the web. The interface> >>>> is absolutely brilliant and a huge leap away from the old method of> >>>> clicking on N, E, S or W to reload an image.> >>>>> >>>> Palli> >>>>> >>>> On 5.2.2006, at 10:09, Plasma Studii wrote:> >>>>> >>>>>> You will need to add the xmlrpc classes to your classpath, but> >>>>>> thats trivial.> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>> hey eric,> >>>>>> >>>>> probably, i'm just not getting this, but seems like the same> >>>>> result> >>>>> >>>>> would be SO much easier with PHP? PHP is super clear, whereas> >>>>> Ajax> >>>>> >>>>> just isn't at all. It's kinda the diff between intuitive and> >>>>> memorized. most folks don't even notice how much they memorize(as> >>>>> opposed to understand), but a lot seem like just arbitrary steps.> >>>>> sorta why reading/writing C is actually FAR more intuitively> >>>>> comprehensible (though compilers are usually convoluted) than> >>>>> anything in Flash.> >>>>>> >>>>> the steps to write to a file (any file on the web, not just> >>>>> XML) in> >>>>> >>>>> PHP are clear. seems it would be a lot more "available to> >>>>> artists"? is there some perk i'm missing here? Seems like> >>>>> bafflingly convoluted MS design?> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>> <?> >>>>>> >>>>> $FileOpen = fopen( "anything.txt", "w" ); // specify file to write> >>>> to> >>>>> if ( $FileOpen ) {> >>>>> fwrite( $FileOpen, "write whatever you want, including HTML, XML> >>>>> or javascript code" );> >>>>> }> >>>>>> >>>>> ?>> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>> that's ALL the code it takes!> >>>>>> >>>>> upload it to a server running php (and about all of em do) this> >>>>> shows up on the page (or it's included with osX, a download, etc).> >>>>> >>>>> the code doesn't. if the page doesn't exist, it'll create it> >>>>> (though there's also a file_exists() function you can use if you> >>>>> don't want that to happen) the php could go absolutely> >>>>> anywhere on> >>>>> >>>>> your HTML page. just name it x.php instead of x.html. it's> >>>>> designed with the coder in mind, not the code (which is why i say> >>>>> an MS thing, they seem to be incapable of thinking any way but> >>>>> from> >>>>> >>>>> their own perspective)> >>>>>> >>>>>> >>>>> reminds me of depreciating the <center> tag. what possible> >>>>> improvement could you make by replacing it?! if it's off by a> >>>>> pixel one in a thousand times, who cares?! (Web design just isn't> >>>>> print design and CSS and XHTML are just blatantly dumb code> >>>>> design) the tag is well worth it just because it works so clearly> >>>>> and without memorizing. Design utility extends to a lot more than> >>>>> just Italian coffee makers and German cars. Code is another> >>>>> appliance.> >>>>> +> >>>>> -> post: list@rhizome.org> >>>>> -> questions: info@rhizome.org> >>>>> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/> >>>>> subscribe.rhiz> >>>>> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> >>>>> +> >>>>> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> >>>>> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/> >>>>> 29.php> >>>>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>> --> >>>> Pall Thayer> >>>> p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca> >>>> http://www.this.is/pallit> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>>>> >>> +> >>> -> post: list@rhizome.org> >>> -> questions: info@rhizome.org> >>> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/> >>> subscribe.rhiz> >>> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> >>> +> >>> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> >>> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/> >>> 29.php> >>>> >>> >>> >>> >> --> >> Pall Thayer> >> p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca> >> http://www.this.is/pallit> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>>>> --> Pall Thayer> p_thay@alcor.concordia.ca> http://www.this.is/pallit>>>>> +> -> post: list@rhizome.org> -> questions: info@rhizome.org> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> +> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php>

--Jason Van Andenhttp://www.smileproject.com

DISCUSSION

Its a Small Works Afterall!


Fellow New Yorkers!

Algorithm 1.005 was selected for the 29th Annual NYU Small Works exhibition, juried by Jack Shainman. If you did not make it out to Vertexlist in Brooklyn last October, now is your chance to see this work without having to worry about the L train. This very personal series continues my pursuit of aesthetically abstracting human emotional behavior using technologies I am more comfortable with. Stop by and check out this and a multitude of other small works. (As always, it would be great to meet some of my virtual friends in person.)

Opening: February 4th, 2006 - Noon to 4pm.

80 Washington Square East Galleries, NY
Hours: Tuesday 10am - 7pm; Wedesday, Thursday 10am. - 6pm.; Friday-Saturday 10am. - 5pm.

More details can be found at my website: smileproject.com.

Tax the Rich!
Jason Van Anden
endlesslist.com

DISCUSSION

Re: RE: Ajax for Artists


Eric! Thank You!
That was incredibly generous and helpful, and probably one of the bestpresentations of this technology I have found online.
I encourage everyone to give this (at least) an hour of their time -as Eric points out, the technology is not rocket science, and once youunderstand it the potential is super far reaching.
A good example (and blantant self promotion) can be found here:
link: http://tax.cf.huffingtonpost.commore memorable link: http://www.endlesslist.com
"Tax the Rich!" uses loads XML from the server to refresh the randomwords that appear over Baby Liberty's head. This could have been hardcoded into the javascript that drives this, but the XML makes it soooomuch easier to maintain (since I am adding these whenever the moodstrikes me). This is the equivalent to a "Hello World" styleexample.
Tax the Rich!Jason Van Anden

On 2/3/06, Eric Dymond <dymond@idirect.ca> wrote:> <xmp>> so whats the big deal?> well you can easily set up xmlrpc servers in many languages.> PHP 5 has full support (see example below, I hacked this from somewhhere else), so does perl (Frontier modules), java, even c-sharp.> Now connecting and intercommunications are simplified and the promise of a community network is available to those with basic programming skills.> For artists this allows us to exchange, and interoperate in new and dynamic layers.> see the AJAX community for more info, but its not rocket science, and it is very enabling.>> Eric>> a php server from elsewhwere:>> <?> $request=<<<END> <?xml version='1.' ?>> <methodCall>> <methodName>getRange</methodName>> <params>> <param>> <value><int>32</int>> </value>> </param>> <param>> <value>> <int>76</int>> </value>> </param>> <param>> <value>> <int>657</int>> </value>> </param>> </params>> </methodCall>> END;> $rpc_server=xmlrpc_server_create() or die("cant make one here");> xmlrpc_server_register_method($rpc_server,"getRange","phpGetRange") or die ("cant register stuff");> $response=xmlrpc_server_call_method($rpc_server,$request,NULL);> echo $response;> xmlrpc_server_destroy($rpc_server);>> function phpGetRange($method,$args,$add_args) {> sort($args);> return array('start'=>$args[0], 'end'=>end($args));>> }> ?>>> and a perl example (what a beautiful language!):> #!/usr/bin/perl> use XMLRPC::Transport::HTTP;> sub circleArea {> shift;> return (22/7)* shift;>> }> my $server = XMLRPC::Transport::HTTP::CGI> -> dispatch_to('circleArea')> -> handle> ;>>> </xmp>> +> -> post: list@rhizome.org> -> questions: info@rhizome.org> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support> +> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php>

--Jason Van Andenhttp://www.smileproject.com

DISCUSSION

Tax the Rich!


Tax the Rich!

"Tax the Rich" is an online political campaign/net artwork created to diffuse the taboo that surrounds this very loaded phrase. It is being presented on the liberal blog The Huffington Post, and is part of a Contagious Media Festival. This net artwork uses humor to bring the phrase "Tax the Rich" into the common venacular. After visiting the following link, you can help me acheive this goal by passing it on to everyone and anyone you think will enjoy it.

http://tax.cf.huffingtonpost.com

An official press release describing "Tax the Rich" can be found here:
http://tax.cf.huffingtonpost.com/press_release.htm

I am taking requests for the randomly presented blurbs - please feel free to email me if you have a good idea!

Jason Van Anden
http://tax.cf.huffingtonpost.com