Jason Nelson
Since the beginning
Works in United States of America

PORTFOLIO (11)
BIO
Without really predicting the future, I've discovered a few places where quality goods can be purchased. I'm
also from Oklahoma, but sadly don't live there now. Being a poet by training, I love the way lights flicker and sounds make my stomach all a flutter.

Jason is scared of being hidden. But then so are the digital bits he farms. Certain regulations require his standing, and then sitting, which is just too damn obvious. Sometimes he teaches at Griffith University (on the coast’s most golden of coasts) as a lecturer in Cyberstudies, although the term conjures robots with beaks and hard wired…somethings. If you like this, you love this: www.heliozoa.com.

Sometimes, after nights of talking with friends late into the night, you come home at three or four in the morning and stumble into the bathroom. After a long release of fluids, and the sound of a night’s hard work being flushed away, you look in the mirror. At first the disheveled interloper in the metal backed glass is someone you don’t know. You douse your face with water and lookup again. Still the head and nose and eyes appear strange wobbling back at you with their curious stare. You strain to recognize the person. You clean the glass with a mildewing towel from the floor and still struggle to befriend this other invading your space.

Perhaps that is the way I feel as a hypermedia poet. After the intoxicating experience of creating hypermedia works, I am bewildered by my artistic reflection. Am I, as some ask, a painter? A poet? A sound manipulator? A multimedia tinkerer? I suppose some would say I am all of these. And others would say none. The work presented here for the Ohio Arts grant represents my pulling together art forms, my collage of poetry, image, sound, movement, and interaction. All of these elements are then filtered through the web environment, allowing for a broad audience, a hypermedia gallery for every computer.

But all of this, all the merging of various genres and technology is still too new, too ever evolving for anybody to know in any coherently explainable way what exactly they are doing. And that is exactly why hypermedia is so beautiful and enticing. Sometime, long ago, someone began classifying and categorizing our world. You are a baker, you are a criminal and you over there are a Central American poet revealing the class struggle. While some say postmodernism is mired in it’s own labeling of anti-labeling paradox, it has, at least, provided a generous platform for the creation of hypermedia works. The previous ideas of what goes where, of what poetic technique is helpful for recreating the pains and joys of life, seem silly in a hypermedia environment. An environment where technology allows the artist to cross boundaries and create new borders. Creativity is dental floss is mouse movement.

When I painfully shave the coarse hairs from my face, and cleaning the cream from my face look into the mirror, I don’t see an artist I can place in a recognizable category. All I see are the crooked lines between my eyebrows and the towel rack behind me. I see a poem forming in the exhaust fans loud and louder buzz. The condensation over words carrying the light from a seventy-five watt bulb to patterns on the floor.

Discussions (71) Opportunities (3) Events (23) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: Re: new media art should/can/should entertain...the charlie thread


I suppose I didnt explain myself clearly

I agree with you Eric, almost entirely......my point has always been
that those small circles, that academic and world of "critical engagement"
(we all of course engage critically), once it has accepted an art form into
its fold, tends to demand certain types of work, work that is easily slotted
into their framework......and while this type of artwork might get the write
ups and all that, the artist tends to get lost in the mix....

so hell yes....artists should create for whatever the hell they want....that is
the reason most of us started creating within new media or net art or e-lit...that
freedom of no certain framework.

However, I do certainly disagree about not caring about the audience.....I never
create with a specific audience in mind, nor do I change my work or emphasize certain aspects of my work for accolades or hits or whatever...but I do want an audience, and I am immensely pleased if someone enjoys my artwork in some small way...and if they dont, well that is fine as well......

cheers, Jason

Eric Dymond <dymond@idirect.ca> wrote:
Don't we call that edutainment?
I honestly don't care if the user is happy, sad, entertained, or whatever state they end up in emotionally.
I am not responsible for their happiness, and I hope I never am.
We make work that fits our artistic sensibilities, and if viewer likes it or not matters not one iota at any point in time.
If you start making work that is aimed at entertaining then you are screwed.
As for conceptually thick..., I don't have a clue what "thick conceptual work" could be.
Forget about conceptual concerns (as Robbin pointed out in his follow up on Lewiitt) and worry about expressing something that somehow fits into your need to put something down/on/out there.
Be expressive/impressive/contradictory/geometric/fluid/ whatever, just don't be conceptual ( at least not in a systemic way, see Chronophobia).
Eric
also see Alex's post re: the first net art work.

Eric

Jason Nelson wrote:

> Alexis and others,
>
> I entirely agree. New Media art has the ability and technique to
> be both highly entertaining and hard and conceptually thick.
>
> But....that might explain why so many once net artists are becoming
> video artists or digital still artists or on interactive
> installation artists.
>
> Interactivity and all the entry points and multiple levels of net
> art almost
> always bring some entertainment onto the screen. So to be accepted
> by
> small circles, one must eliminate the fun, the interactive.
>
> hmmmmm.......kill entertainment equals video art.....
>
> hows this for entertainiing:
>
> http://www.secrettechnology.com/evilmascot/mascotmascot.html
>
> Jason
>
>
>
>
> Alexis Turner wrote:
> ::Quoting "T.Whid" :
> ::
> ::> I'm not arguing that NMA shouldn't be more engaging or, on a
> whole,
> ::> doesn't need improvement. I want it out of the ghetto as much as
> ::> anybody, but criticising it because it's not entertainment isn't
> the
> ::> strategy to get us there.
>
> Let me get one thing straight:
> I'm not criticizing new media art because it's not entertainment. I'm
> criticizing it because it's the antithesis of entertainment.
>
> There's a very entrenched belief
> that something has to be one or the other, and that mere
> "entertainment" is a
> plebian bauble that must be avoided at all costs. The reality, though,
> is that
> thoughtful, critical, engaging, cerebral Art can be neither
> entertaining nor
> painful, or it can be both. There are many places in the middle.
>
> When I suggest that art look to the entertainment sectors for
> inspiration, I
> refer only to the responses that are illicited from the viewer, not
> the content.
> Most entertainment is utter crap in terms of its content, but it DOES
> offer an
> intangible "thing" to the viewer - a chance to be happy, a chance to
> fulfill
> some desire, a chance to be amazed or surprised or shocked, a chance
> to think,
> or be moved, or escape. Successful entertainment does many of these
> things.
> What does NMA do?
>
> So, again, why are we so shocked that non-artists don't view art?
> Because, honestly, what sick fuck is going to willfully go to partake
> of
> something, again and again, that is painful but doesn't offer
> something "more"
> each time? (I mean, besides an academic or an ascetic. They find
> "more" in the
> strangest places.)
>
> Google Earth offers an entire world to explore. It takes a long time
> to make
> one's way through an entire world, and there is always an intangible,
> unknkown
> thing waiting around the corner. It excites us because it promises us
> something new
> if we do it long enough. Maybe we will see an airplane captured in
> mid-flight!
> Hey, I've never seen Borneo before! OMG, there's an island in the
> middle of
> nowhere - I wasn't expecting that! I bet I'm the only one to have
> seen this! It's the same reason people play the lottery, or go to the
> circus,
> or watch a train wreck. *Because maybe this time....* It's even the
> same
> reason that art museums work - because in a still, contemplative
> space, the
> viewer is given a chance to realize that they missed something the
> first time
> around. It's the reason a great novel works (would you argue that
> novels are
> only art or only entertainment, but not both? Personally, I can't
> think of
> anything more entertaining than a damn good book - visual or no - and
> I would
> never in a million years say that books are not art. Perhaps we differ
> on this
> point.)
>
> Entertainment works because it sets up expectation and gives
> something,
> ANYTHING to the viewer. Good art works for the same reason. The two
> are not
> mortal enemies, locked in an eternal death match for the hearts and
> minds of the
> people.
> -Alexis
> +
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>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
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DISCUSSION

new media art should/can/should entertain...the charlie thread


Alexis and others,

I entirely agree. New Media art has the ability and technique to
be both highly entertaining and hard and conceptually thick.

But....that might explain why so many once net artists are becoming
video artists or digital still artists or on interactive installation artists.

Interactivity and all the entry points and multiple levels of net art almost
always bring some entertainment onto the screen. So to be accepted by
small circles, one must eliminate the fun, the interactive.

hmmmmm.......kill entertainment equals video art.....

hows this for entertainiing:

http://www.secrettechnology.com/evilmascot/mascotmascot.html

Jason

Alexis Turner <subbies@redheadedstepchild.org> wrote:
::Quoting "T.Whid" :
::
::> I'm not arguing that NMA shouldn't be more engaging or, on a whole,
::> doesn't need improvement. I want it out of the ghetto as much as
::> anybody, but criticising it because it's not entertainment isn't the
::> strategy to get us there.

Let me get one thing straight:
I'm not criticizing new media art because it's not entertainment. I'm
criticizing it because it's the antithesis of entertainment.

There's a very entrenched belief
that something has to be one or the other, and that mere "entertainment" is a
plebian bauble that must be avoided at all costs. The reality, though, is that
thoughtful, critical, engaging, cerebral Art can be neither entertaining nor
painful, or it can be both. There are many places in the middle.

When I suggest that art look to the entertainment sectors for inspiration, I
refer only to the responses that are illicited from the viewer, not the content.
Most entertainment is utter crap in terms of its content, but it DOES offer an
intangible "thing" to the viewer - a chance to be happy, a chance to fulfill
some desire, a chance to be amazed or surprised or shocked, a chance to think,
or be moved, or escape. Successful entertainment does many of these things.
What does NMA do?

So, again, why are we so shocked that non-artists don't view art?
Because, honestly, what sick fuck is going to willfully go to partake of
something, again and again, that is painful but doesn't offer something "more"
each time? (I mean, besides an academic or an ascetic. They find "more" in the
strangest places.)

Google Earth offers an entire world to explore. It takes a long time to make
one's way through an entire world, and there is always an intangible, unknkown
thing waiting around the corner. It excites us because it promises us something new
if we do it long enough. Maybe we will see an airplane captured in mid-flight!
Hey, I've never seen Borneo before! OMG, there's an island in the middle of
nowhere - I wasn't expecting that! I bet I'm the only one to have
seen this! It's the same reason people play the lottery, or go to the circus,
or watch a train wreck. *Because maybe this time....* It's even the same
reason that art museums work - because in a still, contemplative space, the
viewer is given a chance to realize that they missed something the first time
around. It's the reason a great novel works (would you argue that novels are
only art or only entertainment, but not both? Personally, I can't think of
anything more entertaining than a damn good book - visual or no - and I would
never in a million years say that books are not art. Perhaps we differ on this
point.)

Entertainment works because it sets up expectation and gives something,
ANYTHING to the viewer. Good art works for the same reason. The two are not
mortal enemies, locked in an eternal death match for the hearts and minds of the
people.
-Alexis
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DISCUSSION

rss feed weather visualizer (seeking feedback)


All,
Another work...yes.....but this ones needs some serious feedback.
Do keep in mind it is beta-beta...but try lots of locations and send back
any errors or ideas on what is interesting and what is not so...

the basics: We are taking a real time weather rss feed and then using
the data to load videos, play with creatures on the screen and other keen
things.....(just imagine I said something critically powerful, then look at the
darn work)

http://www.secrettechnology.com/weather\_rss/weather\_rss.html

so before we release it....we wanted your thoughts...you know cause this is
a net art list.....

cheers, Jason Nelson

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DISCUSSION

new net artwork: between treacherous objects


Howdy all,

my fathers recent passing, has spurred some creative urge, most likely
fighting age through creation.

so....new work finished, all thoughts are more than appreciated:
(for those e-lit folks, poetics not actually done, but you get the idea)

oh and find all the secrets....

title: between treacherous objects

http://secrettechnology.com/between/between.html

cheers, Jason Nelson

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DISCUSSION

recent new media/net art debates/rebates: the new divers.


I hate labeling anything as an art movement. But this recent chatter and talk on this list about Net Art being dead, Charlie's article, the new New Media Taschen book etc...does signal something curious.

There seems to be a strong core of divers on this list. I use the term divers to describe
those who dive in and out of the established art world. These are artists whose work crosses too many boundaries, veers off into humor, into the poetry/fiction world,
isn't designy and clean, has sometimes low tech or messy tech, they are artists somewhat isolated by geography or connections. Sure their work might win some awards and appear in the festivals and galleries. But because they are eclectic and
strange. Maybe not describing their work via the right terminologies or addressing
the right issues.

Because of these and more they are divers, Dipping deep into the world that the Taschen book describes and the Charlie's criticize, and then back out. Their work is
difficult to write about, to discuss in the known terms, difficult to fit within chapters.
So, while the art world likes, and sometimes loves their work, they will rarely be
canonized, rarely be featured in chapters or built into singular heros.

And I would argue that it is this group, these divers are what net art should be, or rather what it is. They are ill-fitting, messy, isolated and yet connected, eclectic, scraping together code and software, ideas and poetry to create some truly unique
work.

And as divers we should know that the art world we dip into, should not be our main
audience.

It seems absurd that we aren't talking more about what Annie mentions below, about
finding ways to promote our work elsewhere, to circumvent those establishments
that drove us in this direction, that made us want to move outside the traditional infrastructures.

But...I keep saying this, and am beginning to sound preachy. Jeez though, we
put as much effort into promoting our work to the net, the global net, as we do
with applications for 2,500 dollar grants, we wouldn't care what Charlie said or how
many books we were left out of.

.......Jason

bram <bram.org@gmail.com> wrote:
Art is a closed system that only sees what it already knows. (And is
very badly equipped to access new information)

I think we have to defend new media art
we will have to be missionaries
we will have to educate

we will have to infiltrate
we will have to explain
we will have to promote early netart

And at the same time we should go on to intertwine different spheres,
to develop new ways of seeing the same, never seen before, to
experiment beyond techniques, to develop new ways of generating sense.
Don't forget we (at least some of us) are on the internet because we
don't want to have "art" as our only customer, consumer nor as the
most important vector by which we work.

Yet, we want recognition from the art world because that's the place
we feel at home (at least some of us)

Restart reading at the beginning.

Annie Abrahams

PS 1
What's wrong with watercolours? I would be delighted if as many people
wanted to learn coding as watercolours. One can make cutting edge art
in watercolours, but it's rare.

Art is rare. So the article does not disappoint me. It talks about new
media. We exist!

PS 2
Please ARN explain us a bit more about your poietic aggregator?
Indeed, how many persons are behind?
Tell me why this is more than just another way to produce beautiful
abstract images?
I would like to have them too :)
- Hide quoted text -

On 8/18/06, ARN wrote:
> another quote:
> "The web, Charlie says, has the alarming potential of realising the idea of
> the artist Joseph Beuys, that everyone is an artist. This could spell the
> end of art as we know it, when everyone becomes a producer and we all drown
> in a sea of mediocrity made up of billions of minutely-niched microchannels."
>
> i think this is great, so will better write:
>
> "when everyone becomes a producer and we all grow in a great sea of
> experimentations made up of billions of creative microchannels."
>
> why being so alarmed by JB (& others) idea , Charlie ?
>
>
>
>
>
> marc wrote:
> > Wow - and now we have Charlie Gere putting us all down.
> >
> > "So are artists at the cutting edge of new-media technology? No, says
> > Charlie. One of the problems is that other stuff on the net is so much
> > more mind-blowing. A site such as Google Earth is so much more awesome
> > and thought-provoking than something an arty hacktivist can knock up on
> > her PC."
> >
> > I would love to have an open discussion with him about this stuff this
> > on-line.
> >
> > http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/mtaa/~3/13468813/the\_times\_uk\_does\_new\_media.html
> >
> >
> > Also check rhizome front page...
> >
> > Thanks Charlie, we love you two ;-)
> >
> > marc
> >
>
> +
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--

"Bitter times, I wish I could reassure you."
.news series.

http://www.bram.org/press/rassur
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