Jackie Im

BIO
Jackie Im is an independent curator, writer and artist living and working in Oakland, CA. She has curated exhibitions at the Wattis Institute of Contemporary Art, San Francisco, CA; the Mills College Art Museum, Oakland, CA; Liminal Space, Oakland, CA; S.H.E.D. Projects, Oakland, CA; Pro Arts, Oakland, CA; MacArthur B Arthur, Oakland, CA; and Queens Nails, San Francisco, CA. She has assisted on exhibitions at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, CA; Queens Nails Projects, San Francisco, CA; Intersection for the Arts, San Francisco, CA; and the Walter and McBean Galleries at San Francisco Art Institute. She received her BA in Art History from Mills College and her MA in Curatorial Practice from California College of the Arts. She is currently the editor of Art Cards San Francisco and co-director and curator of Et al., a gallery in San Francisco.
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EVENT

Anthony Discenza: Additional information will be provided later


Dates:
Fri Apr 06, 2012 19:00 - Sun Apr 29, 2012

Location:
Oakland, California
United States of America

Anthony Discenza
Additional information will be provided later

Curated by Jackie Im and Aaron Harbour
April 6 – 29, 2012
Reception Friday, April 6th, 7-10 pm

Open Sundays, 1-5pm, and by appointment.

MacArthur B Arthur is pleased to announce Additional information will be provided later, a solo exhibition of work by Anthony Discenza. Curated by Jackie Im and Aaron Harbour.

In popular remodel shows such as “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition,” the operation of a domestic interior is suspended, and re-envisioned as a production site for the creation of a new, “better” home. The home is denied its identity, its home-ness, for the duration of an unoccupied remodeling. The engine of such shows is the spectacle of a certain “behind-the-scenes” voyeurism, where aggressive demolition is followed by Sturm und Drang consultations regarding fabric colors and bathroom finishes. At the end, a satisfyingly cathartic release is provided for all via the big reveal: the bus is moved, the doors are opened and the home-turned-production site shifts radically, via the implied return of use value, back into a home, one more in keeping with the dictates of conventional tastes and the market.

It can be said that contemporary artistic praxes, in their current deployment, suffer from a similar logic. The metaphor is a tenuous one, but there is some use in it. The artist’s studio is a place where signs and matter are subjected to a process of being broken down, re-imagined and re-assembled, in order that they may be assigned a new status/identity, that of the artwork. Then, magically, these materials, having undergone their makeover at the hands of the artist, are delivered to a venue and set up for display, in the big reveal of “The Exhibition.”

But, as Godard declared, ‘Every edit is a lie.’ What is problematic here is the cut at the end of the show. In EMHE, a large bus reveals the house to the family/us after the remodel is completed, and they/we scream, cry and emote as we proceed to tour the result of the miraculous transformation from old home to new house. But there is always a mysterious break, a point of discontinuity, between the final stages of labor and production and the presentation of the finished result. The remade house is now re-presented as a fait accompli, from which all traces of the intense upheaval we have just witnessed have been purged. Similarly, under the paradigm of exhibition practice, we are typically denied the intense uncertainty of the artist as to the status, quality, and meaning of his/her own product. In this way, the exhibition is a false edit in the flow of actual artistic practice, placing the artist and the work into sharply delineated narratives of production (labor) and presentation (marketing) that deny the often incomplete nature of artistic investigation.

In Additional information will be provided later, Anthony Discenza is presenting work that represents a number of different inquiries within his practice. These works, which may or may not be “finished,” make no attempt to reconcile how they may fit together into a more cohesive narrative or artistic “brand.” We (the curators and Discenza) would like to posit that the remodel of stuff into art is a murkier business than the standard division between [studio production] and [exhibition display ] acknowledges. Our intention is to complicate this model by providing multiple points of access for conversation, critique, expansion, and general uncertainty. We intend to leave open the question of what constitutes a finished work, both in words (via artist/curatorial statements) and in space, by situating both the context and presentation of the work as things most unsettled, forestalling completion of the auratic makeover into art.

MacArthur B Arthur
4030 Martin Luther King Jr. Way
Oakland, CA 94609
macarthurbarthur@gmail.com


EVENT

Hillary Wiedemann: Afterimage


Dates:
Fri Mar 02, 2012 19:00 - Sun Apr 01, 2012

Location:
Oakland, California
United States of America

Hillary Wiedemann
Afterimage

Curated by Kevin Clarke
March 2, 2012 – April 1, 2012
Reception Friday, March 2nd, 7-10 pm

Open Sundays, 1-5 pm and by appointment

MacArthur B Arthur is pleased to announce Afterimage, a solo exhibition of work by Hillary Wiedemann. Curated by Kevin Clarke.

An afterimage is defined as a visual sensation that remains after the initial stimulus is gone. The works in Afterimage stem from Wiedemann’s inquiries into the phenomenology of perception and the lingering sense impressions of memory. The sun plays many roles – a marker of time, a source of light, a determiner of place, and through its absence, the seed of an acute awareness of space. While distinctly aware of the impossibility of recreating the sense-experience of the sun, the works in Afterimage focus on a sensory residue and/or constant state of perceptual remembering.

In Theory of Colours, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe states, “every image occupies a certain space on the retina, and of course a greater or less space in proportion as the object is seen near or at a distance. If we shut the eyes immediately after looking at the sun we shall be surprised to find how small the image it leaves appears.” Wiedemann’s works mines this phenomenological incongruity – the actual image, its afterimage, and the memory of the image. This slippage continues from true recall into memories of memories.

Afterimage conjures something between two forms of spectra – that which pertains to phenomena of light, and that of the incorporeal.

MacArthur B Arthur
4030 Martin Luther King Jr. Way
Oakland, CA 94609
macarthurbarthur@gmail.com


EVENT

Hybrid Narrative: Video Mediations of the Self and Imagined Self


Dates:
Fri Feb 03, 2012 19:00 - Sun Feb 26, 2012

Location:
Oakland, California
United States of America

Hybrid Narrative: Video Mediations of the Self and Imagined Self
Curated by Susannah Magers
February 3, 2012 – February 26, 2012
Reception Friday, February 3rd, 7-10 pm

MacArthur B Arthur is pleased to announce Hybrid Narrative: Video Mediations of the Self and Imagined Self, a group show featuring multi-media installation and video work from the Bay area and beyond, by artists Sofia Cordova, Shana Moulton, Liz Rosenfeld, and Chris E. Vargas.

The artists in this exhibition use video as a device to mediate certain idealized worlds, operating in and on various real, imagined and invented environments, states of mind, alter-egos—and, ultimately, themselves. As both maker and participant, Cordova, Moulton, and Vargas use the visual language of their own performative bodies to enact versions of the self, while Rosenfeld demonstrates this through the interaction of the performative bodies of others. They are at once themselves, other, and hybrids of both. As Moulton says about her character Cynthia in her episodic work Whispering Pines (2004–11), “I guess I’m not Cynthia. But if I’m not, then no one is. I don’t know how much I should separate her from myself.”

While some of the works appear as clear declarations of self, others are more entangled in the subconscious, uncertain of how the self will manifest. Invoking the satirical, Vargas performs in and around various recognizable American sites, including a Mormon temple in Utah and Nancy Holt’s Sun Tunnels (1973-76), exposing himself by lifting his shirt followed by the declaration, “Have you ever seen a transsexual before?” (the title of this work). Dissatisfied with the reception by these real-world sites, Vargas turns to animated environments; a beach paradise surrounded by beachballs, and a tranquil wilderness, where transsexuality is visible and celebrated. Similarly, Moulton navigates a seemingly oppressive domestic space in her series Whispering Pines, languishing in front of Antiques Roadshow or painstakingly mixing a glass of Crystal Light, before escaping and transmuting herself into ethereal Enya Muzak dance parties and other animated, self-guided visualizations. Cordova’s narrative focuses on the (at times conflicted) merging of her Puerto Rican and American identities, infusing found footage with her own, as well as the music of Chu Cha Santamaria, her character that embodies this narrative. In homage to Barbara Hammer’s 1974 Dyketactics, Rosenfeld’s Untitled (Dyketactics Revisited) imagines an unapologetically liberated, queer utopia where, “androgynous figures, skin, and concrete, masquerade through a fantasia of fluid forms referencing history while looking into the future.”

Whether through ambiguous, yet symbolic, incorporation of popular cultural tropes, or more personally imbued visual information, the works create opportunities for identification by the viewer, and speak to an ever-evolving nature of the human spirit and how we continually shape and experience our sense of self.

MacArthur B Arthur
4030 Martin Luther King Jr Way (at 40th)
Oakland, CA 94609
Open Sundays, 1-5pm, and by appointment


EVENT

Two Point Oh


Dates:
Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:00 - Wed Feb 29, 2012

Little Paper Planes is pleased to present Two Point Oh, an online exhibition curated by Jackie Im and Aaron Harbour, featuring work by Constant Dullaart, Ian Dolton-Thornton, Ryan Trecartin, Sabrina Ratté, Pronunciation Book, Kalup Linzy, Sara Ludy, David Horvitz, Chris E. Vargas and Greg Youmans, and Jeremy Deller.

The internet has been a site for art since before the current pervasiveness of home and portable computing. In the 1990’s and early 2000’s artists produced Net Art, often by creating a web page in which a work or a group of works was sited. While these artists were indeed venturing into new territory, their works were and continue to be challenged by specific limitations: how does one present, maintain and drive traffic/viewers to a URL? Should the work become archived? Preserved on a disc or database do interactive elements become null and void? Through a combination of institutional exhibition and acquisition, as well as what could be called a short-sighted view of the ubiquity of the internet equating a universality of access, many early net art works vegetate, islands in a vast sea of websites – accessed via art world specific portals, rarely visited, stationary and un-linked to.


EVENT

Expanded Field


Dates:
Fri Dec 02, 2011 19:00 - Sun Jan 08, 2012

Location:
Oakland, California
United States of America

Expanded Field
Curated by Jackie Im and Aaron Harbour
December 2, 2011 – January 8, 2012
Reception Friday, December 2nd, 7-10 pm

MacArthur B Arthur is pleased to announce Expanded Field, a group show featuring new work by Torreya Cummings, Amy M. Ho, Sarah Hotchkiss, Christine M. Peterson, and Emma Spertus. Curated by Jackie Im and Aaron Harbour.

Expanded Field is an exhibition that takes the gallery space of MacArthur B Arthur – the physical characteristics of the space and its location – as a jumping off point but not an end. In an attempt to move away from the autonomy of the art object and in reaction to their working conditions, artists created works that were specific to a site. Making reference to Rosalind Krauss’ seminal essay, Sculpture in the Expanded Field, the artists in this exhibition have been asked to expand the field of the gallery; to produce work that bears a physical relationship to the exhibition space, yet stretches beyond it creating a hybrid of autonomy and dependence. Through use of visual illusion, architectural reference, and narrative allusion, Expanded Field hopes to explore an artwork’s potential to disorient the viewer and to radically exceed its surroundings.