Jackie Im

BIO
Jackie Im is an independent curator, writer and artist living and working in Oakland, CA. She has curated exhibitions at the Wattis Institute of Contemporary Art, San Francisco, CA; the Mills College Art Museum, Oakland, CA; Liminal Space, Oakland, CA; S.H.E.D. Projects, Oakland, CA; Pro Arts, Oakland, CA; MacArthur B Arthur, Oakland, CA; and Queens Nails, San Francisco, CA. She has assisted on exhibitions at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, CA; Queens Nails Projects, San Francisco, CA; Intersection for the Arts, San Francisco, CA; and the Walter and McBean Galleries at San Francisco Art Institute. She received her BA in Art History from Mills College and her MA in Curatorial Practice from California College of the Arts. She is currently the editor of Art Cards San Francisco and co-director and curator of Et al., a gallery in San Francisco.
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EVENT

The Desert of the Real Itself


Dates:
Fri Oct 05, 2012 19:00 - Sun Oct 28, 2012

Location:
Oakland, California
United States of America

The Desert of the Real Itself
Curated by Amanda Roscoe Mayo
October 5 – 28, 2012
Reception Friday, October 5th, 7-10 pm

MacArthur B Arthur is pleased to present The Desert of the Real Itself, featuring work by Christine M. Peterson, Paolo Salvagione, Adam Thorman, and Adam Waldran-Blain. Curated by Amanda Roscoe Mayo.

The Desert of the Real Itself is an exhibition of artworks that teeter between the act of feigning and the simulacrum. Jean Baudrillard’s questions of territory are explored throughout the exhibition. In his essay “Precession of Simulacrum,” Baudrillard discusses the entropy of space in relation to Cartesian theory, “Abstraction today is no longer that of the map, the double, the mirror, or the concept. Simulation is no longer that of a territory, a referential being or a substance. It is the generation by models of a real without origin or reality: a hyperreal. The territory no longer precedes the map, nor survives it.” The works in the exhibition present systems, highlight boundaries, and arrive at humorous conclusions of where the edge is met.

The border occupies and is occupied by something other than the organizational structure it is exists to serve. It is occupied by, “the magic of the concept and the charm of the real.”


EVENT

In Stasis


Dates:
Fri Sep 07, 2012 19:00 - Sun Sep 30, 2012

Location:
Oakland, California
United States of America

In Stasis
Curated by Jackie Im and Aaron Harbour
September 7 – 30, 2012
Reception Friday, September 7, 7:00-10:00 pm

MacArthur B Arthur is pleased to present In Stasis, featuring work by Johanna Billing, Liam Everett, Roza Janiszewska, Bob Linder, Anna Sagström, and Joseph Thomas. Curated by Jackie Im and Aaron Harbour.

In Stasis is an exhibition that is at a stand off with itself. It is neither about a specific idea nor is it simply a collection of objects, though objects and ideas certainly play a part. The exhibition sits in an intermediary space, much like the people in Johanna Billing’s Project for a Revolution. In it, a young group of people sits waiting for the next thing to happen; there is a potential forestalled, whether this is out of incapacity or apathy is unclear. Likewise the works in the show will take up room in the gallery – waiting for the next step, for something to happen.

In biology a stasis is a period of no evolutionary change, in which a species has reached a state of punctuated equilibrium. Is the exhibition period is a length of time in which a group of objects and images are frozen in such a state – the auratic effect of the nomination artwork taking as its price change – or is presentation the beginning of an alternative state? Whether an artwork equates ambition fulfilled or is rather a barring of the future is difficult to ascertain.

Meanwhile, locked in the gallery, the artworks relax, spending most of their days in an unpeopled room amongst each other without a reading from a viewer or the familiar hand of their fabrication, the memory of which is fading.


EVENT

Corner of the World


Dates:
Fri Aug 03, 2012 19:00 - Sun Sep 02, 2012

Location:
Oakland, California
United States of America

Corner of the World
Curated by Amanda Roscoe Mayo
August 3 – September 2, 2012
Reception Friday, August 3rd, 7:00-10:00 pm

Macarthur B Arthur is pleased to present Corner of the World, featuring the work of Jarrod Beck, Phil LaDeau, Elizabeth Moran, and Margo Wolowiec. This exhibition, curated by Amanda Roscoe Mayo, offers a look into how imagination and memory shapes the content of interior and intimate spaces.

For Gaston Bachelard, a “corner of the world” describes the space of a dwelling. In his seminal text The Poetics of Space these corners are intimate, for they are derived from an identification of a given architectural space as “home.” The content here is sensitive – that of the mind – while its architectural framework is a sturdy vessel. Imagination is of the utmost importance in determining the balance of one’s own corner of the world. Robert Irwin ponders, “our perception presents us with (at every moment) an infinitely complex, dynamic, whole envelope of the world and our being in it.” Corner of the World presents artists whose practices remember, capture, and explore conceptually, notions of spaces that are intimate to them, and perhaps us, if we allow ourselves in.

Jarrod Beck’s (New York, NY) drawings engage physical spaces as they relate to natural and imagined architecture. Plaster casts are elucidated as drawings; they usher into the exhibition space the experience of nature.

Phil LaDeau’s (Austin, TX) drawings delineate space as specific to location. Macarthur B Arthur will become the catalyst for these drawings, which focus on their own materiality as an expression of their occupied space and the spaces they subsequently occupy.

The work of Elizabeth Moran (San Francisco, CA) is approached from the standpoint of the intersection between sites of work and habitation. These photographs of the sets of kink.com when not in use are images loaded with projections of intimacy for all those who encounter these scenes in the context of her practice. The emptiness of these scenes encourages recollection inside of a seemingly foreign place.

Margo Wolowiec (San Francisco, CA) brings us to her homes by sewing their architectural features (from memory) into tissue paper. Like the memory of these places, her sculptures appear simultaneously fragile yet somehow resilient. Memories are overtly present in these works, whether it is that of our own, or ones we share collectively.


EVENT

Anthony Discenza: Additional information will be provided later


Dates:
Fri Apr 06, 2012 19:00 - Sun Apr 29, 2012

Location:
Oakland, California
United States of America

Anthony Discenza
Additional information will be provided later

Curated by Jackie Im and Aaron Harbour
April 6 – 29, 2012
Reception Friday, April 6th, 7-10 pm

Open Sundays, 1-5pm, and by appointment.

MacArthur B Arthur is pleased to announce Additional information will be provided later, a solo exhibition of work by Anthony Discenza. Curated by Jackie Im and Aaron Harbour.

In popular remodel shows such as “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition,” the operation of a domestic interior is suspended, and re-envisioned as a production site for the creation of a new, “better” home. The home is denied its identity, its home-ness, for the duration of an unoccupied remodeling. The engine of such shows is the spectacle of a certain “behind-the-scenes” voyeurism, where aggressive demolition is followed by Sturm und Drang consultations regarding fabric colors and bathroom finishes. At the end, a satisfyingly cathartic release is provided for all via the big reveal: the bus is moved, the doors are opened and the home-turned-production site shifts radically, via the implied return of use value, back into a home, one more in keeping with the dictates of conventional tastes and the market.

It can be said that contemporary artistic praxes, in their current deployment, suffer from a similar logic. The metaphor is a tenuous one, but there is some use in it. The artist’s studio is a place where signs and matter are subjected to a process of being broken down, re-imagined and re-assembled, in order that they may be assigned a new status/identity, that of the artwork. Then, magically, these materials, having undergone their makeover at the hands of the artist, are delivered to a venue and set up for display, in the big reveal of “The Exhibition.”

But, as Godard declared, ‘Every edit is a lie.’ What is problematic here is the cut at the end of the show. In EMHE, a large bus reveals the house to the family/us after the remodel is completed, and they/we scream, cry and emote as we proceed to tour the result of the miraculous transformation from old home to new house. But there is always a mysterious break, a point of discontinuity, between the final stages of labor and production and the presentation of the finished result. The remade house is now re-presented as a fait accompli, from which all traces of the intense upheaval we have just witnessed have been purged. Similarly, under the paradigm of exhibition practice, we are typically denied the intense uncertainty of the artist as to the status, quality, and meaning of his/her own product. In this way, the exhibition is a false edit in the flow of actual artistic practice, placing the artist and the work into sharply delineated narratives of production (labor) and presentation (marketing) that deny the often incomplete nature of artistic investigation.

In Additional information will be provided later, Anthony Discenza is presenting work that represents a number of different inquiries within his practice. These works, which may or may not be “finished,” make no attempt to reconcile how they may fit together into a more cohesive narrative or artistic “brand.” We (the curators and Discenza) would like to posit that the remodel of stuff into art is a murkier business than the standard division between [studio production] and [exhibition display ] acknowledges. Our intention is to complicate this model by providing multiple points of access for conversation, critique, expansion, and general uncertainty. We intend to leave open the question of what constitutes a finished work, both in words (via artist/curatorial statements) and in space, by situating both the context and presentation of the work as things most unsettled, forestalling completion of the auratic makeover into art.

MacArthur B Arthur
4030 Martin Luther King Jr. Way
Oakland, CA 94609
macarthurbarthur@gmail.com


EVENT

Hillary Wiedemann: Afterimage


Dates:
Fri Mar 02, 2012 19:00 - Sun Apr 01, 2012

Location:
Oakland, California
United States of America

Hillary Wiedemann
Afterimage

Curated by Kevin Clarke
March 2, 2012 – April 1, 2012
Reception Friday, March 2nd, 7-10 pm

Open Sundays, 1-5 pm and by appointment

MacArthur B Arthur is pleased to announce Afterimage, a solo exhibition of work by Hillary Wiedemann. Curated by Kevin Clarke.

An afterimage is defined as a visual sensation that remains after the initial stimulus is gone. The works in Afterimage stem from Wiedemann’s inquiries into the phenomenology of perception and the lingering sense impressions of memory. The sun plays many roles – a marker of time, a source of light, a determiner of place, and through its absence, the seed of an acute awareness of space. While distinctly aware of the impossibility of recreating the sense-experience of the sun, the works in Afterimage focus on a sensory residue and/or constant state of perceptual remembering.

In Theory of Colours, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe states, “every image occupies a certain space on the retina, and of course a greater or less space in proportion as the object is seen near or at a distance. If we shut the eyes immediately after looking at the sun we shall be surprised to find how small the image it leaves appears.” Wiedemann’s works mines this phenomenological incongruity – the actual image, its afterimage, and the memory of the image. This slippage continues from true recall into memories of memories.

Afterimage conjures something between two forms of spectra – that which pertains to phenomena of light, and that of the incorporeal.

MacArthur B Arthur
4030 Martin Luther King Jr. Way
Oakland, CA 94609
macarthurbarthur@gmail.com