Ivan Pope
Since the beginning
Works in Brighton United States of America

BIO
In the place where analogue and digital overlap, that's why you will find me in the kitchen at parties.
Everything is at my site, http://blog.ivanpope.com
Discussions (225) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: Know Where You Are


Hi Pall,
Yes, I know of course, GPS information doesn't tell you 'where you are'.
I wasn't really connecting the two in a literal sense. I just had this
thought that knowing where you are might be a fundamental human right
that is worth talking about. Thinking about this raises exactly the
issue you raise: what information do you need to 'know where you are'.
I'm interested in chrono-geography. That is, I like to look at location
and time. There's another layer on knowing where you are, i.e. what date
are you at etc.
I'm interested in theoretical aspects of location and psychogeography.
How would you define the information that anyone should be given in
order that they 'know where they are'.
Cheers,
Ivan

Pall Thayer wrote:

>> Following a GPS visit to the Isle of Wight last week, I was wondering
>> what the point of universal GPS was and where it would lead us. I had
>> a huge thought: Knowing where you are is a fundamental human right.
>
>
> True, it is a fundamental right. No one should be made to suffer the
> perils of not knowing where they are. But the fundamental question
> here is, "Does a GPS device tell us where we are?"
>
> How do we define location? If I tell you, in a casual phone
> conversation (while you are sitting at a cafe with no maps on you),
> that I'm at N58 24.10 E10 18.20, does that tell you where I am?
>
> If I'm lost in the desert somewhere and my trusty GPS device tells me
> my coordinates, I'm no better off unless I can supplement it with
> additional information and if I can, a simple compass would do me just
> as much good.
>
> On the other hand, I might be able to tell you during our phone
> conversation that to my left is a wide river, on the other side of the
> river is big old church. On my right is a street with some
> restaurants. Do you know where I am? Do I know where I am?
>
> Pall
>
> Ivan Pope wrote:
>
>> Following a GPS visit to the Isle of Wight last week, I was wondering
>> what the point of universal GPS was and where it would lead us. I had
>> a huge thought: Knowing where you are is a fundamental human right.
>>
>> We take this for granted as we generally know where we are.
>> Who might not know where they are? Prisoners, patients, soldiers,
>> children, workers, passengers --
>> What do we mean by 'where we are'? I am in a University of Brighton
>> lecture room, in the sculpture department, in the Grand Parade
>> buildings, in south Brighton, in Brighton, on the south coast, in
>> East Sussex, in Sussex, in the South East, in the South of England,
>> in England, in Great Britain, in the United Kingdom, in norther
>> Europe, in Europe, in the norther hemisphere, in the west, in the
>> first world, on Earth -- etc
>>
>> How can we ensure we know where we are? What steps need to be taken
>> to ensure people know where they are? What are the effects of not
>> knowing where you are?
>>
>> Is the right to know where you are anywhere enshrined in law?
>>
>> And while I'm on the subject:
>>
>> I'm doing two GPS for Artists workshops with SCAN
>> <http://www.scansite.org/scan.php?pid30>on Feb 19th at Quay Arts,
>> Isle of Weight and on March 12 at New Greenham Arts so if you fancy a
>> free day out with a GPS unit and a camera and an introduction to GPS
>> for artists, please book up now.
>>
>>
>> GPS for Artists, Ivan Pope workshop, 19/2/05 Quay Arts, Isle of Wight,
>> UK; 12/3/05 New Greenham Arts, Berkshire UK
>>
>>
>> Places still available and it is free to attend. Booking essential.
>> Phone 01590 682824
>>
>> Ivan Pope presents A Locative Day Out
>>
>> The satellite based Global Positioning System (GPS) allows us to
>> record basic information about their location, direction, altitude
>> and speed. Using small hand held devices, artists can record and
>> interpret this data to create mapping, locative, durational and other
>> works. GPS allows us to take back knowledge of our whereabouts, and
>> to annotate this knowledge, or to reuse it as we wish.
>>
>> Artists can use access to this locative data that forms the
>> background to all our lives, to add another layer of information to
>> work. Whether we want accurate information or chaotic disinformation,
>> the gps satellites transmit unceasingly 24 hours a day, not caring
>> whether we make use of their datastreams or not. We can anonymously
>> take up their offering and convert it to human data.
>>
>> This one day live workshop will introduce the basic functioning of
>> the GPS and demonstrate GPS devices and software along with digital
>> cameras. Participants will be able to use GPS devices and digital
>> cameras in the field to create their own personal mappings of the
>> locality. These mappings will form the basis for a workshop in
>> creating combined and annotated maps and images.
>>
>> We will spend the day looking at software and hardware and discussing
>> psychogeographic and locative issues while making our own maps,
>> playing gps games and adding to the global store of waypoints.
>>
>

--
Business Blogging <http://blog.telememetics.com/blog.html>

DISCUSSION

Know Where You Are


Following a GPS visit to the Isle of Wight last week, I was wondering
what the point of universal GPS was and where it would lead us. I had a
huge thought: Knowing where you are is a fundamental human right.

We take this for granted as we generally know where we are.
Who might not know where they are? Prisoners, patients, soldiers,
children, workers, passengers --
What do we mean by 'where we are'? I am in a University of Brighton
lecture room, in the sculpture department, in the Grand Parade
buildings, in south Brighton, in Brighton, on the south coast, in East
Sussex, in Sussex, in the South East, in the South of England, in
England, in Great Britain, in the United Kingdom, in norther Europe, in
Europe, in the norther hemisphere, in the west, in the first world, on
Earth -- etc

How can we ensure we know where we are? What steps need to be taken to
ensure people know where they are? What are the effects of not knowing
where you are?

Is the right to know where you are anywhere enshrined in law?

And while I'm on the subject:

I'm doing two GPS for Artists workshops with SCAN
<http://www.scansite.org/scan.php?pid30>on Feb 19th at Quay Arts, Isle
of Weight and on March 12 at New Greenham Arts so if you fancy a free
day out with a GPS unit and a camera and an introduction to GPS for
artists, please book up now.

GPS for Artists, Ivan Pope workshop, 19/2/05 Quay Arts, Isle of Wight,
UK; 12/3/05 New Greenham Arts, Berkshire UK

Places still available and it is free to attend. Booking essential.
Phone 01590 682824

Ivan Pope presents A Locative Day Out

The satellite based Global Positioning System (GPS) allows us to record
basic information about their location, direction, altitude and speed.
Using small hand held devices, artists can record and interpret this
data to create mapping, locative, durational and other works. GPS allows
us to take back knowledge of our whereabouts, and to annotate this
knowledge, or to reuse it as we wish.

Artists can use access to this locative data that forms the background
to all our lives, to add another layer of information to work. Whether
we want accurate information or chaotic disinformation, the gps
satellites transmit unceasingly 24 hours a day, not caring whether we
make use of their datastreams or not. We can anonymously take up their
offering and convert it to human data.

This one day live workshop will introduce the basic functioning of the
GPS and demonstrate GPS devices and software along with digital cameras.
Participants will be able to use GPS devices and digital cameras in the
field to create their own personal mappings of the locality. These
mappings will form the basis for a workshop in creating combined and
annotated maps and images.

We will spend the day looking at software and hardware and discussing
psychogeographic and locative issues while making our own maps, playing
gps games and adding to the global store of waypoints.

--
Ivan Pope
ivan2@ivanpope.com

Studio website -->http://ivanpope.com
Absent Without Leave --> http://blog.ivanpope.com

DISCUSSION

Know Where You Are


Following a GPS visit to the Isle of Wight last week, I was wondering
what the point of universal GPS was and where it would lead us. I had a
huge thought: Knowing where you are is a fundamental human right.

We take this for granted as we generally know where we are.
Who might not know where they are? Prisoners, patients, soldiers,
children, workers, passengers --
What do we mean by 'where we are'? I am in a University of Brighton
lecture room, in the sculpture department, in the Grand Parade
buildings, in south Brighton, in Brighton, on the south coast, in East
Sussex, in Sussex, in the South East, in the South of England, in
England, in Great Britain, in the United Kingdom, in norther Europe, in
Europe, in the norther hemisphere, in the west, in the first world, on
Earth -- etc

How can we ensure we know where we are? What steps need to be taken to
ensure people know where they are? What are the effects of not knowing
where you are?

Is the right to know where you are anywhere enshrined in law?

And while I'm on the subject:

I'm doing two GPS for Artists workshops with SCAN
<http://www.scansite.org/scan.php?pid30>on Feb 19th at Quay Arts, Isle
of Weight and on March 12 at New Greenham Arts so if you fancy a free
day out with a GPS unit and a camera and an introduction to GPS for
artists, please book up now.

GPS for Artists, Ivan Pope workshop, 19/2/05 Quay Arts, Isle of Wight,
UK; 12/3/05 New Greenham Arts, Berkshire UK

Places still available and it is free to attend. Booking essential.
Phone 01590 682824

Ivan Pope presents A Locative Day Out

The satellite based Global Positioning System (GPS) allows us to record
basic information about their location, direction, altitude and speed.
Using small hand held devices, artists can record and interpret this
data to create mapping, locative, durational and other works. GPS allows
us to take back knowledge of our whereabouts, and to annotate this
knowledge, or to reuse it as we wish.

Artists can use access to this locative data that forms the background
to all our lives, to add another layer of information to work. Whether
we want accurate information or chaotic disinformation, the gps
satellites transmit unceasingly 24 hours a day, not caring whether we
make use of their datastreams or not. We can anonymously take up their
offering and convert it to human data.

This one day live workshop will introduce the basic functioning of the
GPS and demonstrate GPS devices and software along with digital cameras.
Participants will be able to use GPS devices and digital cameras in the
field to create their own personal mappings of the locality. These
mappings will form the basis for a workshop in creating combined and
annotated maps and images.

We will spend the day looking at software and hardware and discussing
psychogeographic and locative issues while making our own maps, playing
gps games and adding to the global store of waypoints.

--
Ivan Pope
ivan2@ivanpope.com

Studio website -->http://ivanpope.com
Absent Without Leave --> http://blog.ivanpope.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Electronic Folk Art?!


Sure you don't need an MFA to be an artist. But I do wish more
net.art.media.art.code.art.online.art was more integrated with and aware
of art history and practice. A lot of practice is just flailing around
on the margins, interesting but not advancing anything.
You don't need an MFA to be an artist, but you can easily not be an
artist without an MFA.
Ivan

t.whid wrote:

> One needs an MFA to be an artist!!!?????
>
> good thing MTAA has M.River for our bona fides.
>
> And wasn't Max Herman the master of Electronic Folk Art?
>
> On Jan 25, 2005, at 11:18 AM, liza sabater wrote:
>
>> color me stupid but almost all the first wave of software artists
>> that i know personally have no MFAs. i find it oxymoronic to need an
>> MFA to call yourself an artist these days. and does this mean PRicans
>> can't make art? don't make me go there ;-)
>>
>>
>> On Tuesday, Jan 25, 2005, at 11:02 America/New_York, Francis Hwang
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> On Jan 25, 2005, at 6:37 AM, patrick lichty wrote:
>>>
>>>> Is there a New Media "Outsider Art"?
>>>
>>>
>>> Well, there's plenty of digital creativity that is done by people
>>> who have no interest in contextualizing it in the world of fine
>>> arts, if that's what you mean.
>>>
>>> Sometimes I read an essay about the aesthetics of code by somebody
>>> who doesn't program very much, and I think: It's like it's the
>>> 1980s, and programmers are like Puerto Rican graffiti artists
>>> without MFAs.
>>>
>
> ===
> <twhid>http://www.mteww.com</twhid>
> ===
>
>
> +
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--
Business Blogging <http://blog.telememetics.com/blog.html>

DISCUSSION

The Long Tail of Art Webring


>From my blog Absent Without Leave
http://blog.ivanpope.com/awol/2005/01/the_50_print.html

The Long Tail of Art Webring

January 19, 2005 The Long Tail of Art
<http://blog.ivanpope.com/awol/the_long_tail_of_art/index.html>

This Long Tail of Art thing has three parts:
1. Serious artists who are making some form of relatively inexpensive
work available over the Web
2. A loose network of these artists
3. A casual agreement to cross promote the network, and a desire to
create a value-space so that others can point people to the loose network.

The idea is that we will build up our sMedia Capital over the long term
and we will end up with a rollling income from selling work. sMedia
Capital is the traffic that accrues over time to an interesting site -
it takes a while for promotional work to embed itself within the
networks of interest, but once that promotion is embedded, it tends to
have a slow decay time.
The loose network is a casual arrangement to create valuable
destination(s) that are worth other building links to. So, anyone within
this loose network must offer something above and beyond the sale of
art. For this initial (experimental) project, I am creating a Web Ring
that I will control access to.
The Web Ring is called the Long Tail Web Ring (LTWR). It has some simple
rules that are in flux, i.e. they will evolve by discussion:
1. Members of the LTWR are active art producers who are selling some
form of work via the Web
2. Member sites of the LTWR offer some online value beyond the selling
of work, e.g. an art blog, personal art site, archive etc, whatever
3. Members of the LTWR agree to cross promote the LTWR to others. This
is informal, i.e. mention it, link to it, point to it, put it in your
email sig
4. Members agree to place the LTWR webring buttons ABOVE THE FOLD on the
front page of their web site. This means it is visible on when someone
arrives at the site. Members are encouraged to put the links on every
page, but hey, no pressure.

That's it for now. The LTWR is an experiment. I'm interested in what
sort of work people will offer within LTWR. I don't expect it to be huge
oil paintings, but I've got no real view of what will work and what
won't. I'm doing digital prints and signing them, but anything from
drawings to sound files to conceptual work should be fine. Try me.

As my contribution to my research into the Long Tail of Art (here,
passim), I decided to sell prints from my work at a flat rate $50 per
print (plus postage). I didn't want to do anything complicated, but I
thought I had an obligation to start my ball rolling. I'm using
Flickr.com to show all my images and I've made a group called $50
<http://flickr.com/photos/ivan/sets/87912/> prints where I'm putting all
the available work More about how this will work soon.

I'm going to put up a page about the LTWR and make some link buttons
etc. As soon as I've got two more members I'll open up the ring and we
can take it from there.

http://blog.ivanpope.com/awol/2005/01/the_50_print.html

--
Ivan Pope
ivan2@ivanpope.com

Studio website -->http://ivanpope.com
Absent Without Leave --> http://blog.ivanpope.com