Ivan Pope
Since the beginning
Works in Brighton United States of America

BIO
In the place where analogue and digital overlap, that's why you will find me in the kitchen at parties.
Everything is at my site, http://blog.ivanpope.com
Discussions (225) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Question for artists who seek commissions


Just for the record, I didn't write the first bit:
>
> Ivan Pope wrote:
>
> > >
> > > Plus, as an artist who is working on ideas that are many times
> > > un-stylish or not seemingly current, I usually don't have any
> > interest
> > > at all in the themes. I don't wish to pander to an institution for
> > $$
> > > and it's dangerous to one's work as it can sidetrack you as you
> > attempt
> > > to develop a body of work with themes of your own devising.
> > >

But I did write the following.

> > Personally, I'm not above just submitting whatever I've got on the go
> > at the
> > time and seeing whether the curators have any idea of their own
> > theme.
> > Generaly not. Or they are fishing for whatever comes through the door.
> >
> > Consider the current Rhizome call (not to attack it or anything, for
> > illustration):
> >
> > Artists seeking a Rhizome.org 2004 commission should propose projects
> > that
> > ... reflect in some way on the ... interpretations of "game" found
> > at
> > Dictionary.com, [which includes]:
> >
> > Informal.
> > 1.. Evasive, trifling, or manipulative behavior: wanted a straight
> > answer,
> > not more of their tiresome games.
> > 2.. A calculated strategy or approach; a scheme: I saw through their
> > game
> > from the very beginning.
> > Seeing as artists tend to avoid (or should avoid) literality, I would
> > suggest it is up to the viewer to decide what the 'theme' of work is.
> >
> > Submit it and see.
> >
> > Cheers,
> > Ivan
> >
> >
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
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> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
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>

DISCUSSION

Re: Question for artists who seek commissions


>
> Plus, as an artist who is working on ideas that are many times
> un-stylish or not seemingly current, I usually don't have any interest
> at all in the themes. I don't wish to pander to an institution for $$
> and it's dangerous to one's work as it can sidetrack you as you attempt
> to develop a body of work with themes of your own devising.
>

Personally, I'm not above just submitting whatever I've got on the go at the
time and seeing whether the curators have any idea of their own theme.
Generaly not. Or they are fishing for whatever comes through the door.

Consider the current Rhizome call (not to attack it or anything, for
illustration):

Artists seeking a Rhizome.org 2004 commission should propose projects that
... reflect in some way on the ... interpretations of "game" found at
Dictionary.com, [which includes]:

Informal.
1.. Evasive, trifling, or manipulative behavior: wanted a straight answer,
not more of their tiresome games.
2.. A calculated strategy or approach; a scheme: I saw through their game
from the very beginning.
Seeing as artists tend to avoid (or should avoid) literality, I would
suggest it is up to the viewer to decide what the 'theme' of work is.

Submit it and see.

Cheers,
Ivan

DISCUSSION

Re: Manik


>
> Is it me or was anyone else
> confused and slightly offended
> by Manik's handful of semen posting
> today?
>
> please advise,
>
Missed that, thanks for pointing it out. What I dont understand is a)what
you are confused about b)how you know it is semen c)what the point of
posting your hesitant confusion to the list is? I mean, if you are slightly
offended, you can just ignore manik in future etc. Its not as if the list
has anything to do with it, nor would it really have any advise for you. It
seems that you just cant resist advertising your personal position on this
issue. Actually, its liquid soap. Cheers, Ivan

DISCUSSION

Re: PS


Subject: RHIZOME_RAW: PS

> .. no that's not quite true.. I know some artists who
> are interested in games..but that feels at one
> remove..are they *really* "as much a part of adult
> life as TV"??

Well, I am an adult and I know a lot of adults and I don't really come
across any games related discussion. e.g. no-one says to me 'did you get
that new game ...' or 'I was playing Eggrace last night, did you do that
too' or whatever, the sort of thing that they say about TV stuff.
I mean, games are of course interesting and throw up all sorts of issues,
but then so do most other commercial/entertainment arenas.
I think there is a laziness amoung curators that leads them to cotton onto
themes (or is this memes) that are doing the rounds.
The Rhizome commissions cover the same ground: 'Artists are invited to
submit proposals for works of art that focus on the theme of games.'
Anyway, I'm sure we'll see a lot more of this stuff in the next few years.
Cheers,
Ivan

> --- defne ayas <dayas@newmuseum.org> wrote:
> > JAN 29, 2004 Digital Culture Evening 6:30 - 8PM
> >
> > New York-based artist Cory Arcangel will host a
> > games programming workshop as part of the Killer
> > Instinct exhibition.
> >
> > "Killer Instinct"
> > December 12, 2003 - February 1, 2004
> >
> > Once considered a pastime for kids, games are now a
> > full-fledged part of adult life, situated as a
> > shared public culture not unlike television. Games
> > come off the screen and to life in this exhibition
> > including sculpture, video, painting, and, of
> > course, Ataris and computers. Besides experimental
> > hacks of commercial games, Killer Instinct features
> > artists who use game hardware and software for
> > social commentary as well as in the development of
> > musical and filmic projects. Player, viewer, artist,
> > curator or critic -- the cross-pollination of gaming
> > and art spheres allows visitors to assume several of
> > these roles during the course of the exhibition.
> > Killer Instinct is organized by Anne Barlow and
> > Rachel Greene.

DISCUSSION

Re: Welcome to Distributed Creativity--Week 3


Dear Rhizomers,
It is considered bad form to subscribe people to lists without their
knowledge and/or agreement.
We are all suffering from a flood of spam which threatens to overwhelm us.
Yet, I suddenly find that I am subscribed by proxy to a list called
mailinglist@switchstance.com
Did I ask to subscribe to this list? No. Can I unsubscribe? Only by
unsubscribing to Rhizome.
And why is this a problem?
Well, my mail box now fills up with piles of emails discussing some tosh
with no beginning and no end and most of them NOT EVEN SIGNED.
You ask the question:
> Does the creative subversion of an open community help us imagine stronger
models for such communities, or merely undermine them?
Well, I don't know about creative subversion here. It seems to me that what
the switchstance project has done is hitched a free ride on a long
established community.
Yours v. pissed off.
Ivan

----- Original Message -----
From: <mailinglists@switchstance.com>
To: <list@rhizome.org>
Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2003 3:03 PM
Subject: RHIZOME_RAW: Welcome to Distributed Creativity--Week 3

> Welcome to week three of Distributed Creativity, a critical online forum
co-organized by Still Water at UMaine and Eyebeam.
>
>
> <b>Digital Karma: Innovations in Ethics</b>
> co-hosted by Rhizome
>

> I'd like to welcome our moderators for this week-Rachel Greene, Patrick
Lichty, Perry Garvin, as well as participants Carol Stakenas, Yael Kanarek,
Carlo Zanni, Jeremy Turner, Jessica Hammer, Lizbeth Goodman, Etienne
Cliquet. They will have questions of their own to pose, but let me prime the
pump with the following:

> Does the creative subversion of an open community help us imagine stronger
models for such communities, or merely undermine them?
>