Holly Crawford
Since 2005
Works in United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

PORTFOLIO (1)
BIO
Holly Crawford is cross media artist, behavioral scientist, economist and art historian. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Essex in Art History and Theory, B.A and M.A. in Economics and M.S. in Behavioral Science from UCLA. From 2004-2006, she was a non-clinical Fellow at NYU Medical School Psychoanalytic Center. Her art and poetry (www.art-poetry.info) give new meanings and draws categories themselves into question through transformative juxtapositions. Her projects include: Offerings (Ars Electronica, (.net Participant); Open Adoption, The Road, Hyphens, Voice Over, Found Punctuation (video) Tate Modern 2007, My I have your autograph? (unofficial, Basel Miami Art Fair 2007), Critical Conversations in a Limo, NY 2006 (VIP project, Armory), 2007 in Melbourne (MIAF) & San Francisco (The LAB & Sesnon Gallery UCSC), Sound Art Limo, NY and Melbourne 2007, Flatland Limo, NYC 2008. Many projects are ongoing, site specific and participatory. Publications: Artistic Bedfellows, ed., 2008, Attached to the Mouse, 2006 and catalogue essay, “Disney and Pop” in Once Upon a Time Walt Disney Studio; Artistic Bedfellows, edited, 2008. Some projects are created and curated through AC (Art Currents) which she created and directs, www.artcurrents.org She taught art at UCLA and SVA. She was born in California and now lives in New York City.
Discussions (5) Opportunities (21) Events (149) Jobs (1)
EVENT

AC Institute presents three solo exhibitions on the theme of exchange and value


Dates:
Thu Oct 28, 2010 00:00 - Fri Oct 01, 2010

The AC Institute presents three solo exhibitions on the theme of exchange and value
October 28- December 4, 2010
Opening Event: Thursday, October 28, 6-8PM

Featuring:
Derek Curry: Viaticus Par Eximo Sermo (money is free speech) and Tulipeo Feteo
Jennifer Gradecki: IRB# G10-02-066-01
Dima Strakovsky: The Erotic Life of XAU


Derek Curry: Viaticus Par Eximo Sermo (money is free speech) and Tulip Feteo
Derek Curry’s work aims to make people aware of their own actions as performing a function within a social system. He intends to make visible the underlying structure that dictate how people react to, or work within a paradigm or set of unquestioned assumptions. Ultimately, the goal is to provoke people to question their unarticulated presuppositions. To accept certain precepts is to give credence or power to a belief or authority. By demonstrating that those precepts are the result of a paradigmatic belief system, Curry hopes to undermine, or at least to encourage the viewer to question, that system’s authority.
Viaticus Par Eximo Sermo (money is free speech) is an installation that demonstrates how legal rulings that regard the spending of money for political campaigns as free speech effectively means that increased spending power is speech amplification. Crickets encased in a series of steel and Plexiglas boxes accompanied by a megaphone and paper money represent this relationship. Charts, diagrams, and drawings convey the history of money being legally considered free speech and illustrate how loud a cricket would be if it had the wealth of a major corporation.
Tulipa Feteo aims to cross the genes of a tulip with a carrion flower, creating a tulip that smells like rotting flesh. The tulips will be planted at sites affected by economic bubbles as a reminder of the first economic bubble, the Tulip Bubble. Presently, viewers are invited to place scratch and sniff stickers in place of the flowers.

Jennifer Gradecki: IRB# G10-02-066-01
Over the past six years, Jennifer Gradecki’s work has pulled from the histories, methodologies and values of both social science and art, often mining the darker sides of human behavior. Utilizing techniques traditionally employed by social scientists, she provides a framework that enables people to reflect on their perceptions, while questioning the belief that science and art should be exclusionary to one another. Through staged clinical lab settings, scripted performances, sculptural installations, data visualization, and both hidden and explicit data collection techniques, she investigates and displays the viewer/participant’s behavior as well as systems of power relations.
IRB# G10-02-066-01 is a participatory installation that questions the boundaries of ethics in psychological research, explores the possibility of exchange between the fields of art and psychology, and examines the social relations that a shock machine may represent or produce in a gallery setting. The piece consists of an Institutional Review Board (IRB) application for a study entitled Social Interaction as a Function of Voluntary Engagement with a Shock Machine, letters of correspondence with the IRB, two chairs flanking a small table that holds a shock machine, and a sign that explains the guidelines for participation. The letters of correspondence on display contain Gradecki’s efforts to convince the IRB that she is producing meaningful information and preserving participant autonomy. Viewers are invited to use the shock machine, which has two electrode leads and two hand-held push buttons to allow for two people to shock each other simultaneously.

Dima Strakovsky: The Erotic Life of XAU
Photograph by Robert Dickes
It is absolutely amazing that a system of global exchange can be based on a desire for a bright, yellowish, glittering metal. Gold is valuable, but its value does not originate in the realm of economics. It is beautiful, pretty, shinny and a whole list of other "fuzzy" adjectives. Until very recently gold was the cornerstone of the world financial exchange and is still used as a hedge against inflation. In short, the most vital quantitative system on the planet (finance) has at its core a qualitative value judgment.
Gold provides a perfect foil for talking about the idea of beauty and value of aesthetic judgment. In some ways it is a reflection of the system that sends the values of art (read aesthetically relevant) objects sky high. In other ways it is an embodiment of the "purest of beauties." That is, unlike artworks, it is least likely to be an object of speculative pricing; there are several international agreements to assure us that this will not happen. In this way we prop up our decision, care for it, and try to make sure that it is never questioned.
Strakovsky chooses to look at this process as a highly complex durational performance. This act is mirrored in The Erotic Life of XAU; one gram of gold is levitated using a helium balloon. For the sculpture to stay afloat and functioning, the balloon has to be refilled by the gallery staff for the
entire duration of the show.

Bios:
Derek Curry was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1976. He received his BFA from the University of South Florida (2007) and his MFA in New Genres from UCLA in 2010. Working with a variety of material from copyright law to bacteria, Curry’s work frequently involves viewer participation, sometimes without the participants’ knowledge of their involvement. He has exhibited at the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg, FL, the Tampa Museum of Art, and The Atlantic Center for the Arts. While he has shown nationally in art galleries and museums, it is also common to find his work outside of a traditional art context in the form of public interventions. Currently, Derek lives and works in Los Angeles.

Jennifer Gradecki was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1980. As an undergraduate, she attended the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, earning a double major in Sculpture and Experimental Social Psychology and a minor in Art History. She earned her MFA in New Genres from UCLA in 2010. Gradecki is an emerging national artist. Her work has been exhibited in galleries, museums, and alternative spaces from Los Angeles to New York, including Crisp London Los Angeles, Cal State Long Beach, and the Milwaukee Art Museum. Gradecki has presented her psychological research at the Midwestern Psychological Association’s annual conference. In 2008, she co-curated the Wight Biennial. Gradecki can also be found performing experiments, usually uninvited, at galleries, museums, and other public places. She currently lives and works in Los Angeles.

Dmitry "Dima" Strakovsky was born in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1976. He has lived in the United States since 1988. Dima completed his MFA degree at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago's Department of Art and Technology and stayed in Chicago for several years producing art and working for various companies in the toy invention industry. In 2006 he began his full time academic career at the University of Kentucky (Lexington).
Dima's work spans across diverse media: robotic/kinetic installation, sound, video, performance and graphic arts. His work has been included in a variety of exhibitions and events at venues such as Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music, LA FREEWAVES 2008 and Moscow International Biennale for Young Art 2010.

Shows run from October 28, 2010 to December 4, 2010

Artists talks to be scheduled. Check back!

About AC Institute: AC’s mission is to advance the understanding of art through investigation, research and education. It is a lab and forum for experimentation and critical discussion. We support and develop projects that explore a performative exchange across visual, verbal and experiential disciplines. We encourage critical writing that challenges conventional expectations of meaning and objectivity as well as the boundaries between the rational and subjective.

Art Currents is a non-profit 501(c)3.

AC Institute
547 W. 27th St, 6th Floor New York, NY 10001 Gallery #610
www.artcurrents.org / email: info@artcurrents.org Gallery Hours: Wed., Fri. & Sat.: 1-6pm, Thurs.: 1-8pm


EVENT

Decision Making and Output - an artist talk by Kim Wan


Dates:
Fri Sep 10, 2010 00:00 - Wed Sep 01, 2010

The AC Institute presents an artist talk by Kim Wan
Friday, September 10 at 4pm

Decision Making and Output

In this talk about his installation at AC Institute, When does a gallery give away artworks?, Kim Wan will discuss his artistic practice, how the concept of the installation came into being, and the making and "defacing" of 210 individually painted one dollar bills. He will also be taking questions from the floor.

About When does an art gallery give away artworks?:
Just when does an art gallery give away artworks, hand-made especially for the free market? In a world of climate change and water shortages does free, clean water mean anything to a person living in the developed world? Are paintings more important than water? When does money become art, instead of art accruing fiscal value? These are some of the questions posed in this installation by artist Kim Wan.
The installation itself consists of hand-painted $1 bills, photocopies of drawings, a water-cooler with a set of scales and plastic cups. As the viewer enters the space, s/he is offered the choice of taking either a photocopy or a cup of water. The painted dollar bills, however, stay on the wall, occupying the space and remain indeterminate.
“I am attempting to set up a market economy within the gallery space. In response to the project brief, I have identified differences between the ‘artificial’ value that consumers place on luxury objects such as paintings, and the ‘real’ value placed on natural resources - such as a cup of water. In identifying the choices and economic forces which shape and inform a free-market economy, I wish to enter into a discourse where the artworks become an interactive and quantifiable commodity. My aim is to realise interpretations and debates surrounding the capitalist system whilst provoking discussion and debate Art, money, death, life.............” (Kim Wan)


About Kim Wan:


Kim Wan is a contemporary artist working on an international platform. Recent collaborations include a self-portrait in the National Portrait Gallery, London; exhibiting work alongside Van Gogh; and public art in Bejing. Kim is a process-based artist, investigating materials and different disciplines and then developing them into more advanced and/or reconciled works. Educated at Winchester School of Art, UK, in Fine Art and trained as a painter with an artistic lineage tracing back to David Bomberg, Kim reaches beyond formal approaches to the problem of painting and embraces the new. Art insiders have described Kim Wan as being in that group of painters that includes Bacon, Freud and Auerbach. Being of Chinese-Malay and English descent, this heady mix informs Kim’s work. Not Chinese work, not English work, but both and more: informed by a far-reaching global consciousness.
www.kimwanart.wordpress.com

Gallery #610
Wednesday - Saturday: 1-6PM, Thursday: 1-8PM
www.artcurrents.org / info@artcurrents.org
Art Currents is a non-profit 501(c)3


EVENT

AC Institute Opening Event


Dates:
Thu Sep 09, 2010 00:00 - Sat Jul 31, 2010

AC Institute

Sept. 9th, 2010 from 6-8 pm
For the first exhibitions of the new season!

New Space Gallery #610
Same location, just one floor up.

The AC Institute presents five solo exhibitions on the theme of exchange and value

Featuring:
Be Andr: Structure
Katie Latona: The ‘Eat My Problems’ Bake Exchange
Sebasjtan Leban and Stas Kleindienst: Buy Your Own Art Experience
Max Liboiron: The New York Trash Exchange (NYTE)
Kim Wan: When does an art gallery give away artworks?


Be Andr:Structure
The piece Structure explores the links between exchange and value. It is an interactive installation that continues to be created and grow as the audience interacts with it by exchanging something of their own for a piece of the art work - a poster depicting the value of one pound in different currencies on the day the idea of the piece occurred to the artist.

The objects the visitors decide to exchange for a piece of art should be placed on the black area on the floor as an integrated part of the installation.

When the black area on the floor is full of objects they will be removed and placed into black plastic bags next to the exchange area. The plastic bags will be part of the installation, and will be exhibited as part of the installation when the piece is on display.

This installation will continue to grow as more and more people interact with it. When all the posters are exchanged new ones must be printed.

In this way the installation continues to grow each time it is exhibited. The number of black plastic bags will show how well it is received and in that way also be a measure of its value.

Katie Latona: The ‘Eat My Problems’ Bake Exchange
Taking the form of a traditional “bake sale,” this project presents a group of anonymous problems, baked into cookies, that are available for exchange with the viewer. To receive a cookie, the viewer (now participant) must submit one of his or her own problems, by writing it down on the card provided, and depositing it into the box. The submitted problems will then be baked into the next batch of cookies, which will be replenished throughout the exhibition.

At its most basic level, the “bake sale” sees a cookie traded for our participation in the project. The cookie is “free” in that no money changes hands, but it does ask something of us: that we engage with the project. We also exchange our problem for someone else’s; we are able to relieve ourselves of a burden, whether mundane (“netflix addiction”) or deeply personal (“premature ovarian failure”), only to take on another’s. We are sharing the load.

Is one problem worth more than another? Is one cookie less enticing because of what is stamped into it? Is it fair to exchange a “strange groin lump” problem for the “flat bike tire” cookie? Is that considered a bargain? What is the value of my labor, as the artist and baker?

Sebastjan Leban and Stas Kleindienst: Buy Your Own Art Experience
Who, how and what defines what an artwork IS? The answer to this question can be traced in the system of valorization of artwork, which defines, values and places the artwork in a larger social context inscribing it at the same time into the genealogy of the history of art. One of the fundamental problems of the art world and the art market is the attachment to the original as some kind of fetish, which of course, is evaluated with all of society’s fetishes and installed into a specific hierarchical valorization. The project Buy Your Own Art Experience explores and exposes the issue of idealization of art and the artist, the valorization system of artworks and capital produced through the culture industry. The project consists of five performances documented in photographs. Those who buy the performance will have the possibility to participate in the real performative act. On the contrary, if one decides to buy a photograph (object), the performances will be interrupted and the final result of the project will be an object-photograph as a pure commercial artefact. Thus the buyer will be faced with the fact that he/she can consciously activate the process of context alienation, which cancels the performative element of the project by transforming it into an object.

The Leban/Kleindienst’s artistic practice is characterized by intermedia interdisciplinarity that is reflected in the critical analysis of the systems of valorization (in the arts and in other fields), contemporary migration, new forms of colonialism and other phenomena occurring within the changing social formation. Through art and theory, Leban/Kleindienst intervene into specific systems with the aim to establish contemporary critical tools that enable to rearticulate the ever more complex social reality.

Max Liboiron: The New York Trash Exchange (NYTE)
The New York Trash Exchange (NYTE) is a cross between a cultural laboratory experiment, environmental activism, and a model of economic change. Like all of Max Liboiron’s recent work, this piece is a participant-determined, interactive economy based on trash. A miniature city has been made from New York City discards. Gallery visitors are welcome to take any piece of the city away with them at any time as long as they make and leave something behind in exchange. This single rule of interaction mimics a steady-state economy, where there is no net growth or decline, though there is still development.

All of Liboiron’s trash installations include a different one-rule economy. Gallery visitor’s interactions with the work usually create social economies that exhibit different characteristics than those of everyday market-driven capitalism. They tend to show that people are not inherently greedy, self-maximizing, or selfish, but generous, creative, and even daring in their relationships to goods and to each other. Visitor actions are tracked with video or surveys and the data is used to model and imagine sustainable economic and material futures.

New Yorkers are the ultimate test of self-interest and material accumulation, but New York is also a bastion of creativity— how will visitors to the AC Institute choose to “develop” this miniature New York City? Will it be impoverished, with viewers taking the best pieces and leaving behind rubbish (as Canadian curators and critics have predicted)? Or will it flourish? The end result is in your hands.

The final outcome of the exhibition will be published at www.maxliboiron.com

Kim Wan: When does an art gallery give away artworks?
Just when does an art gallery give away artworks, hand-made especially for the free market? In a world of climate change and water shortages does free, clean water mean anything to a person living in the developed world? Are paintings more important than water? When does money become art, instead of art accruing fiscal value? These are some of the questions posed in this installation by artist Kim Wan.

The installation itself consists of hand-painted $1 bills, photocopies of drawings, a water-cooler with a set of scales and plastic cups. As the viewer enters the space, s/he is offered the choice of taking either a photocopy or a cup of water. The painted dollar bills, however, stay on the wall, occupying the space and remain indeterminate.

“I am attempting to set up a market economy within the gallery space. In response to the project brief, I have identified differences between the ‘artificial’ value that consumers place on luxury objects such as paintings, and the ‘real’ value placed on natural resources - such as a cup of water. In identifying the choices and economic forces which shape and inform a free-market economy, I wish to enter into a discourse where the artworks become an interactive and quantifiable commodity. My aim is to realise interpretations and debates surrounding the capitalist system whilst provoking discussion and debate Art, money, death, life.............” (Kim Wan)

Bios:

Be Andr was born in 1978 in Oslo, Norway and now resides and works in London. He studied at Slade School of Fine Art, UCL London. His art has been exhibited at the ‘Third Thoughts’ exhibition at CCA Andraxt, Spain curated by Barry Schwabsky and Carol Szymanski. Some of his new pieces will be shown at the ‘Multiplied: Contemporary Edition Fair’ at Christie’s, London in October 2010.

Katie Latona was born in Islip, New York in 1981, and received a BA from Fordham University in 2003. She works in a variety of media on projects for galleries and public spaces, and has exhibited nationally. From a background in painting, Katie’s practice is now predominately materials-based, and involves performance, photography, and video. Her focus has long been on using ephemeral systems to investigate language: how it circulates, and what it asks of us. She is currently an MFA candidate at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with her degree due in 2011.

Sebastjan Leban is working in the field of art and theory. He is a co-founder and co-editor of Reartikulacija and is a lecturer of Radical Critical Analysis at the Academy of Visual Arts (AVA) in Ljubljana. His artistic practice involves the collaboration with Stas Kleindienst and the group Reartikulacija. He has exhibited in numerous national and international exhibitions, participated in many symposiums and had texts published in several different publications. He is currently enrolled in a Ph.D. program at the Institute of Philosophy at SRC of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts.

Stas Kleindienst
works in the field of art and theory in collaboration with Sebastjan Leban and is a member and a co-fouder of the group Reartikulacija. He has exhibited in numerous exhibitions in Slovenia and abroad and has had texts published in different publications. He lives and works in Ljubljana.

Max Liboiron is an artist and academic whose understandings of environmental relationships were formed growing up in rural northern Canada in an area disproportionately affected by poor environmental health, deforestation, reservation poverty, and climate change. Now a PhD candidate at New York University in Media, Culture, and Communication, Liboiron continues to work with issues of environmental sustainability—specifically, garbage— in academia while exhibiting her art in Canada and the United States.

Kim Wan is a contemporary artist working on an international platform. Recent collaborations include a self-portrait in the National Portrait Gallery, London; exhibiting work alongside Van Gogh; and public art in Bejing. Kim is a process-based artist, investigating materials and different disciplines and then developing them into more advanced and/or reconciled works. Educated at Winchester School of Art, UK, in Fine Art and trained as a painter with an artistic lineage tracing back to David Bomberg, Kim reaches beyond formal approaches to the problem of painting and embraces the new. Art insiders have described Kim Wan as being in that group of painters that includes Bacon, Freud and Auerbach. Being of Chinese-Malay and English descent, this heady mix informs Kim’s work. Not Chinese work, not English work, but both and more: informed by a far-reaching global consciousness.

www.kimwanart.wordpress.com


Shows run from September 9, 2010 to October 16, 2010
Artists talks to be scheduled. Check back!


About AC Institute: AC’s mission is to advance the understanding of art through investigation, research and education. It is a lab and forum for experimentation and critical discussion. We support and develop projects that explore a performative exchange across visual, verbal and experiential disciplines. We encourage critical writing that challenges conventional expectations of meaning and objectivity as well as the boundaries between the rational and subjective.

Art Currents is a non-profit 501(c)3.
AC Institute
547 W. 27th St, 6th Floor New York, NY 10001 Gallery #610
www.artcurrents.org / email: info@artcurrents.org Gallery Hours: Wed., Fri. & Sat.: 1-6pm, Thurs.: 1-8pm


OPPORTUNITY

Narrative / Identity


Deadline:
Wed Sep 15, 2010 00:00

Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else's opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation."
Oscar Wilde

Narrative / Identity - Open Call for group exhibition

As a means of grappling with the flux of identity, narratives are a necessary part of individual and social constructs. Whether internal or external, narratives define how we see ourselves and others.
Which facts construct our identities?
Do we have a variety of identities and what makes us change them?
Is the identity we display in public different than our private one?
What happens if we take an identity of another person?
Does an ID or passport tell the most important things about us? If you don’t have one does it mean you are invisible?
Does education and knowledge about society and politics change our identity?

For the first group show of 2011, February 3 - March 12, curated by Nicole Bebout and Sonja Hofstetter, The AC Institute seeks to investigate the ways in which narrative is used by contemporary artists to construct or demolish our ideas of self and other. Whether through guerrilla-like disruption, ambiguity or fantasy inspired story-telling, we are seeking artists who see narrative as essential to their artistic identity.

Focusing on experimental, installation, and new media work, AC seeks submissions from contemporary artists, and others, working in any medium. Artists are encouraged to submit work either already existing or as-yet unrealized that addresses the interlocking questions of narrative and identity; either at the level of social practice, contemporary representation, or both.
Email submissions should be sent to submissions@artcurrents.org by Sept. 15th, 2010. Please include the following in the body of your message (not as attachments):


-A short description and/or images of the work you are proposing for our spaces


-Your standard CV and contact information


-Links to your website or other sites where materials could be viewed, if possible

NO ATTACHEMENTS PLEASE

About AC Institute:
The AC Institute exists to advance art through investigation, research and practice. It is a lab for experimentation and a forum for critical discussion. Emphasizing emerging, international, and under-represented artists, the Institute develops projects across disciplines, exhibiting work deploying a variety of strategies for critical, experiential, and performative interventions in the field of contemporary art. In addition to publishing critical writing that pushes conventional expectations of meaning and objectivity, the AC Institute realizes off-site projects taking place at the edge of the art marketplace. Committed to an integrated vision of creative practice, Art Currents creates autonomous spaces to pursue experimental work. The AC institute is non-profit 501(c)3 under the Direction of Holly Crawford.

Since moving to Chelsea in September of 2008, AC has mounted numerous exhibitions and performances, participated in the 2009 Armory show with Critical Conversations in a Limo; collaborated with over 50 artists; and worked with various cultural organizations including Rhizome and Harvestworks to pursue its mission. We provide space, programming support, and certain A/V equipment. Please see our website for more information: www.artcurrents.org.

AC Institute [Direct]
547 West 27th street, # 610, 6th floor
New York, NY 10001


EVENT

The AC Institute presents 4 new exhibitions


Dates:
Thu Jul 01, 2010 00:00 - Tue Jun 15, 2010

Immediate Release
An AC Institute [Direct Chapel] Curated Event July 1 - July 31, 2010
Opening Event: Thursday, July 1, 2010 6-8pm

Featuring:
The KIT Collaboration + Robert Saucier: Virutorium
Owen Mundy: You Never Close Your Eyes Anymore
Hannah Ross: I Have Plagiarized Jennifer Wroblewski: Get Free
Contact: info@artcurrents.org

The Kit Collaboration + Robert Saucier: Virutorium Virutorium is the second joint project by The Kit Collaboration + Robert Saucier. Their first project, named Infrasense, was a large-scale sound installation that toured 11 galleries in Canada, UK, USA and Belgium between 2004 to 2006 and dealt with the cultural economy of paranoia surrounding the word ‘virus’ in its biological (sexual), computational (coding) and capital (marketing) forms. Virutorium is an interactive robotic sound installation, a kinetic and aural work that advances themes originated in the
Infrasense project. This new project explores the extensive and pervasive cultural dynamics of the ‘virus’ and seeks to highlight how far viral systems and models are influencing bodily and computer based communication systems, modes of capitalism and socio-sexual relations, ultimately contemplating how we construct cultural memories about transient entities that we consider detrimental to our livelihoods.

Owen Mundy: You Never Close Your Eyes Anymore Owen Mundy’s artwork considers places where money and culture collide. Often involving collaboration, software and interventions, it manifests in both private and public spaces, initiating dialogue by engaging with history, vernacular forms of communication and the political order. The development of his sculptural and digital practice continues an interest in the cultural construction of meaning through mechanical means of representation. You Never Close Your Eyes Anymore is an installation that projects moving US Geological Survey (USGS) satellite images using handmade kinetic projection devices. Each device hangs from the ceiling and uses electronic components to rotate strips of satellite images on transparency in front of an LED light source. They are constructed with found materials like camera lenses and consumer by-products and mimic remote sensing devices, bomb sights and cameras in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. The installation includes altered images from various forms of lens-based analysis on a micro and macro scale; land masses, ice sheets and images of retinas, printed on reflective silver film.

Hannah Ross: I Have Plagiarized In honor of Hal Davis' 1985 court case, Hannah Ross has taken famous contemporary works and copied them. Without altering the images in any manner, she converted the digital images to computer code, and displayed the code. There is a grey area when it comes to US copyright law; because a derivative work is allowed to attain copyright on the basis that the original was creatively altered. But the extent of alteration and what constitutes "creativity" is vague. An additional technicality is that in order to begin a derivative work, you must be granted permission by the owner: "only the owner of copyright in a work 
has the right to prepare, or to authorize someone else to create, a new version of that work." The act of creation itself is the infringement. So these works are in violation of copyright law because they are identical to the
originals, but are just read in a different visual format.

Jennifer Wroblewski: Get Free For Get Free, Jennifer Wroblewski frames "the real" as the perceived limitations inherent to life in the material world. The temporary installation investigates possibilities of finding freedom through a transcendence of the material body, and an embrace of that which is our energetic presence in the material universe. The goal of this temporary installation/wall drawing is to challenge and redefine ideas about the drawing as object by creating a site-specific, impermanent installation. The drawing is a byproduct of a performance, the casting of a spell, an offer of a different version of reality for both artist and viewer. The space becomes the body, in constant motion, externalized. Following the exhibition the walls will
be repainted, the drawing lost forever. The work cannot be preserved, framed, purchased. The work itself is fleeting, as are all moments of freedom.

Bios:
The KIT Collaboration has produced numerous interactive robotic installations for galleries and museums, sound and video projects for new-media festivals, and site-specific works for offsite locations across Europe, the Middle East, North America, Australasia, and Japan. It has also been producing internationally touring exhibitions and has been curated into group shows for galleries and biennials since its conception as a collaborative unit in 1995. Invited to undertake residencies in universities, sculpture parks, production units, to research its work, The KIT Collaboration develops its projects from a wide range of situated practices.
Robert Saucier is originally from the province of New Brunswick, and currently lives and works in Montréal, Canada, where he is a professor of sculpture and media art at the University of Québec in Montréal (UQAM). Since he began his professional practice in 1979, Saucier has produced artworks for many solo exhibitions and has been curated into group exhibitions for galleries, museums, and festivals in Canada, USA and Europe. He is an active member of Hexagram (Art and Technology Research and Development Centre) in Montréal, which funded portions of his recent research in the robotic arts.

Owen Mundy is an artist, designer and researcher. He was a photographer in the US Navy and has a BFA in Photography from Indiana University and an MFA in Visual Arts from the University of California, San Diego. He is based in Tallahassee, FL, and is an Assistant Professor in the School of Art and Design at Florida State University. His work has been shown at Transitio\_mx 03 in Mexico City, the California Center for the Arts, compactspace in Los Angeles, Golden Thread Gallery in Belfast, APEXART in New York, the Sarai Media Lab in New Dehli.

Hannah Ross was born in Washington D.C. and spent six years living abroad in Panama, Japan and the UK. She received her BFA from New York University and has completed photographic training through the Pratt Institute and the Corcoran. Ross is a multidisciplinary artist with a focus on photography who makes satirical works about the notion of ideal Americana, the influence of media and society's conventions. A majority of her inspiration derives from international cognitive studies, personal experiences, sociology and commercial trends. In looking at how society functions and grows, Ross finds links between humanity's method of thinking and its actions.

Jennifer Wroblewski is a visual artist whose work consists mainly of monumentally scaled drawing and drawing installation projects. She is the recipient of a 2009 NYFA Fellowship in Printmaking/Drawing/Book Arts. In 2008 she was selected to participate in Radius 11, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum’s program for emerging artists. She was a 2008-2009 recipient of and Artist Fellowship at A.I.R. Gallery in Brooklyn, during which time she had her first solo New York exhibition, "New Monuments to the AntiConcept." Her work was recently reviewed in the New York Times (December 20, 2009) and a drawing was included in Timeless: The Art of Drawing at the Morris Museum (NJ). Since 2006 Ms. Wroblewski has been an adjunct lecturer in the School of Art+Design at (SUNY) Purchase College.

About AC Institute [Direct Chapel]:
AC’s mission is to advance the understanding of art through investigation, research and education. It is a lab and forum for experimentation and critical discussion.
We support and develop projects that explore a performative exchange across visual, verbal and experiential disciplines. We encourage critical writing that challenges conventional expectations of meaning and objectivity as well as the boundaries between the rational and subjective.

Art Currents is a non-profit 501(c)3.
AC Institute [Direct Chapel] 547 W. 27th St, 5th Floor New York, NY 10001 5th Floor - #519-529, North Alcove www.artcurrents.org / email: info@artcurrents.org Gallery Hours: Wed., Fri. & Sat.: 1-6pm, Thurs.: 1-8pm