Greg J. Smith
Since 2003
smith@serialconsign.com
Works in Toronto Canada

BIO
Greg J. Smith is a Toronto-based designer and researcher with interests in media theory and digital culture. Extending from a background in architecture, his research considers how contemporary information paradigms affect representational and spatial systems. Greg is a designer at Mission Specialist and is a managing editor of the digital arts publication Vague Terrain. His writing has appeared in a variety of publications including: Creative Applications, Current Intelligence, Rhizome, Vectors and the Handbook of Research on Computational Arts and Creative Informatics.

Greg has presented work at venues and institutions including EYEO Festival (Minneapolis), the Western Front (Vancouver), DIY Citizenship (Toronto), Medialab-Prado (Madrid) and Postopolis! LA. He is an adjunct instructor in the CCIT program (University of Toronto/Sheridan College) and has taught courses for CSMM (McMaster University) and OCAD University.

blogosphere linkology


linkology.jpg
a networked data visualization of the most-linked-to 50 blogs & their interconnections. each arrow represents a hypertext link that was made sometime in the past days. those links can be considered as 'votes' in an endless global popularity poll. many blogs vote for each other: 'blogrolling'. some top-50 sites do not have any links from the others, usually because they are big in Japan, China, or Europe, regions still relatively new to the phenomenon.
see also blogviz & weblog conversations & mydensity.
[newyorkmetro.com|thnkx

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A Game More Powerful


Quite possibly the most practical video game of the year. It is a nonviolent strategy game where events have been taken directly from our contemporary history and players must overcome mass conflict using practical (read: nonviolent) techniques and abstract planning savvy. If you're not ready to rise up just yet then it may be prudent to play this while you remain sedentary.

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c4 datametics


datametics.jpg
A simultaneous concert & film performance that uses data as its material & theme, highlighting the ways in which data shapes our understanding of the world. Video images of landscapes are progressively abstracted into a language of data. facts, figures & diagrams are used in a graphic montage. the data is derived from the natural world, from global systems such as economics & from research mathematics.
[ryojiikeda.com|via dataisnature.com]

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search engine shape milling


searchengineshapemilling.jpga data visualization machine that erodes rivers, canyons & valleys driven by online search queries. search requests get inscribed in a block of PU-foam (75cm x 75cm x 10cm) by a 3D milling-machine.
the search queries are interpreted as eroding forces on the surface of the landscape & used as energy impulses that move the milling-head steps forward. activity removes material, inactivity keeps it. in times with less activity (e.g. night hours) the machine works slow & at peak times (e.g. midday) the machine works very fast & hectically. the space/time sculpture embodies an not existing place, made visible by the users of the search-engine. see also email erosion & sexual behavior totems.
[no-surprises.de]

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interactive waterfall display


interactive_waterfall.jpg

An interactive art installation built in a new children's hospital. as people move in front of this display they affect ripples of virtual water colours. the more they move, the faster the colours change, encouraging children to be more active & playful. when there is no or little activity in front of the waterfall, the display phases simple rainbow colors & ripples lightly. [setpixel.com]

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Discussions (37) Opportunities (5) Events (15) Jobs (0)
EVENT

Vague Terrain 19: Schematic as Score


Dates:
Mon May 02, 2011 00:00 - Sat Dec 31, 2011

Over the past few years, a strong reaction against the sterile world of laptop sound and video has inspired a new interest in analog processes, and a fresh exploration of the pioneers of the electronic arts during the pre-digital era of the 1960s and 1970s. Artists and inventors such as Nam June Paik, Steina & Woody Vasulka, Don Buchla, Serge Tcherepnin, Dan Sandin and David Tudor all constructed their own unique instruments long before similar tools became commercially available or freely downloadable--often through a long, rigorous process of self-education in electronics. John Cage once quipped that Tcherepnin's synthesizer system was "the best musical composition that Serge had ever made", and it is precisely Cage's reformulation of the concert score from a list of deterministic note values to a set of indeterministic possibilities that allowed the blurring of lines between instrument-builder and music composer that followed.
The current issue of Vague Terrain, curated and edited by Derek Holzer, features an eclectic range of young, contemporary artists who have revisited and expanded upon the philosophies and works of this earlier generation. Operating at the extreme edges of the DIY electronics scene, builder-composers such as Peter Blasser, Jason R. Butcher, Moritz Ellerich, Lesley Flanigan, Martin Howse, the Loud Objects (Kunal Gupta, Tristan Perich and Katie Shima), Jessica Rylan and Synchronator (Bas van Koolwijk & Geert-Jan Prins) all represent some of the most radical and idiosyncratic artistic approaches to creative circuitry of the moment. Their compositions take the form of systems which provide a map of what is possible, but lack a prescribed route on how to get there. The discovery—-and the risk—-is left to the moment of the performance.


OPPORTUNITY

Ongoing Call for Guest Curators


Deadline:
Fri Aug 31, 2012 00:00

Vague Terrain ( http://vagueterrain.net ) has recently entered its fifth year of showcasing progressive, idiosyncratic digital art practices. Our growth is due in large part to the contributions of guest curators who have shared their expertise and energy with us, including Joshua Noble, Kim Cascone, Paul Prudence, Rob Cruickshank, CONT3XT.NET, Carrie Gates and David McCallum. We would like to continue to collaborate with members of the digital art community, and are inviting proposals from interested artists or curators to work with us on future issues of Vague Terrain.

Journal Format: The best way to get a sense of our project is to browse the archives. Each issue is a mix of essays, interviews, in-depth documentation of multimedia projects, broader surveys of art practices and EP-length audio art and experimental music releases. We aren't locked to a specific formula and have featured issues almost entirely dedicated to article-length essays or music. Each issue should feature 8-15 contributors.

Schedule: We are looking for guest curators for issues to be published in January 2011 and onward. A curator will need about 90 days of lead time to organize an issue and establishing communication with the invited artists at the beginning of the process is one of the most involved tasks. The guest curator will work with the Vague Terrain team to set up a timeline for participating artists to follow.

Responsibilities - A guest curator is responsible for the following:

*Writing an initial statement and using it to invite artists to participate in the issue
Ensuring that participating artists understand our submission guidelines (we provide documentation)
*Ensuring that incoming submissions are approximately on schedule and complete
*Writing a forward to frame the issue theme and contextualize included work

Support - Vague Terrain offers the following assistance with the above duties of the curator:

*Provide documentation regarding submission guidelines
*Arrange for the proofreading and editing of content
*Organizing and publishing all the content that the curator has solicited
*An FTP account for the issue through which contributors can upload their work
*Once the issue is launched we will promote the material through various online art/media networks

Interested curators and digital artists should email us with the following:

*a brief abstract describing their proposed theme and how it relates to their research
*An artistic or scholarly CV or a link to a personal website
*Optional: a list of artists whose work would be representative of the proposed topic

Deadline: This is an open, ongoing call. However curators interested in the January slot should contact us ASAP as we'll be selecting the curator for that issue in early September.

Submissions and inquires should be sent to submit@vagueterrain.net


DISCUSSION

Required Reading


@Edwin "No one really knows what is in the box" That line makes me think of 'Kiss Me Deadly' and The Great Whatsit! Perhaps that divine glow is that magic that makes Apple industrial design so alluring (at least at a product launch, before the bugs are apparent).

@Thomas - the video sounds fascinating. I'm downloading it now.

Thanks for posting this Ceci!

DISCUSSION

Untitled (2008) - Igor Eskinja


These pseudo icons are even better than the real thing. This is the only time I will ever quote U2.

EVENT

Vague Terrain 16: Architecture/Action


Dates:
Wed Feb 17, 2010 00:00 - Wed Feb 17, 2010

Announcing Vague Terrain 16: Architecture/Action

The latest of edition of Vague Terrain presents a timely and nuanced consideration of ubiquitous computing. Guest curated by the American artist/programmer Joshua Noble, the issue provides a window into the practices of several leading researchers. Given the arrival of gestural interfaces and preliminary deployments of augmented reality technology and "intelligent" architecture, it is an important moment for thinking about the relationship between technology and the body. Noble on this current milieu: "All technologies reshape the body and the space around the body, from the bow and arrow to the steam engine to the telephone. It may be that we are beginning to truly see how computing and ubiquitous devices will once again reshape our bodies and our conceptions of ourselves in space."

The issue features text, interview and project contributions from: Jonah Brucker-Cohen, Golan Levin, Pierre Proske, Mark Shepard and Marilena Skvara.

To view the issue please visit: http://vagueterrain.net/journal16