Geof Huth
Since 2004
Works in Schenectady, New York United States of America

BIO
Geof Huth

The Family

Geof Huth was born in Burlingame, CA, and has lived in California, Portugal, Canada, the District of Columbia, Barbados, Bolivia, Ghana, Morocco, Tennessee, Somalia, and Germany, and New York. He learned to read and write Portuguese and German before English, but eventually lost both those languages. He married Nancy Frye in 1984, and they have two children: Erin, born 1984; and Timothy, born 1989. Because of his interest in the unexamined edges of language, he documented the family wordways of this family and the families of his and his wife's youth in Familiar Words: How We Speak Alone Together (pdqb: Schenectady, NY, 1996).

The Poet

Geof Huth is a writer in many forms, but has a particular interest in visual poetry and the visual presentation of the written word. He has published a number of chapbooks, including Analphabet (Burning Press: Lakewood, OH, 1993), Dachau: afterwards (IZEN: Athens, OH, 1995), The Dreams of the Fishwife (Xexoxial Editions: Madison, WI, 1989), ghostlight (Runaway Spoon Press: Port Charlotte, FL, 1990), Peristyle (emPo Publications: Seattle, 1989), To a Small Stream of Water (or Ditch) (Standing Stones: Old Hickory, TN, 1992), vision: exterpreting the phaistos disc (dbqp: Schenectady, NY, 2002), and wreadings (Runaway Spoon Press: Port Charlotte, FL, 1987). He has published poetry and other writing in over 150 journals in eight countries.

The Publisher

Geof Huth founded the micropress dbqp in Horseheads, New York, in 1987, and this press has followed him as he has moved across the state of New York. dbqp has focused on publishing visual and conceptual poetry and other creative explorations of language and meaning. The output of dbqp (and his visual poetry) has been exhibited in about a dozen exhibits in six countries.
Discussions (1) Opportunities (0) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Apple Basic from 1987


Steve, et al.,

I've been muddling through the issue of my Apple Basic code for a while. I no longer have access to an Apple II machine (and my floppies--about eight years old--are doubtless useless by now. So I've tried another tactic: emulation. I downloaded an emulator for Apple II machines, but I can't run the programs. Jim Andrews assumes I need an emulator for an Apple Basic, but I can't find one.

Here's my Apple Basic code for my shortest poem:

100 HOME
110 SPEED= 100
120 VTAB 8: HTAB 23: PRINT “CLEAVE”
130 VTAB 9: HTAB 23: PRINT “CLEAVE”
140 FOR PAUSE = 1 TO
150: NEXT
150 SPEED= 250
160 VTAB 8: HTAB 26: PRINT “ AVE”
170 VTAB 9: HTAB 26: PRINT “ AVE”
180 FOR PAUSE = 1 TO 2000: NEXT
190 VTAB 8: HTAB 23: PRINT “ ”
200 VTAB 7: HTAB 23: PRINT “CLE AVE”
210 VTAB 9:HTAB
23: PRINT “ ”
220 VTAB 10: HTAB 23: PRINT “ ”
230 FOR PAUSE = 1 TO 1000: NEXT
240 VTAB 7: HTAB 23: PRINT “CLEAVE ”
250 VTAB 10: HTAB 23: PRINT “CLEAVE ”
260 FOR PAUSE = 1 TO 1000: NEXT
270 VTAB 7: HTAB 23: PRINT “CLEAVE”
280 VTAB 8: HTAB 23: PRINT “CLEAVE”
290 VTABL 10: HTAB 23: PRINT “ ”
300 VTAB 9: HTAB 23: PRINT “CLEAVE”
310 VTAB 9: HTAB 23: PRINT “ ”
320 FOR PAUSE = 1 TO 2000: NEXT
330 HOME
340 REM WRITTEN 29 NOV 1987, JOHNSTOWN, NY
350 END

And here's a link to my blog entry discussing this issue:

http://dbqp.blogspot.com/2004/08/not-quite-emulating-past.html

Thanks for any help.

Geof

Steve Kudlak wrote:

> I'll check out his blog and ask to see the code. It should be
> possible to re-cast it into something else. It would interesting
> to look at the code and see what it does. Since for a long time
> artists and programmers were seperate lots (groups) programming
> languages were never designed to accomplish art taks. Some things
> are powerful but there is a high overhead to learning them.
> Others are easier but don't let one have the level of manipulation
> that real programming languages do. I dunno how easy it would be for
> a random art type to learn Java, I remember a friend who wrote all
> these neat little Java things with sound effects and all. She had
> train whistles, lion roars, seven second cuts from Xena the warrior
> Princess, so I could imagine all sort of stuff couldbe done in Java.
> I missed picking up Visual Java for $2.00 in a trift store once.
> Drat!;)
> Anyway I'll ask around
>
>
> > But why wouldn't he proceed to get that working using a 1987
> Macintosh??
> >
> > Geert
> > (http://nznl.com)
> >
> > On Jun 13, 2004, at 11:14 PM, Jim Andrews wrote:
> >
> >> There's a terrific long-time visual poet from Schenectady named
> Geof
> >> Huth
> >> who did some computer poetry in 1987 using Apple Basic. I'm
> wondering
> >> how he
> >> might proceed to get at least part of that working now. He does
> have
> >> the
> >> code. Apparently it was full screen and involved sound and kinetic
> >> poetry.
> >> Suggestions? His blog, by the way, is http://www.dbqp.blogspot.com
> and
> >> is
> >> well worth checking out.
> >>
> >> ja
> >>
> >>
> >> +
> >> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> >> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> >> -> subscribe/unsubscribe:
> http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> >> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> >> -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to
> non-members
> >> +
> >> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> >> Membership Agreement available online at
> http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
> >>
> >
> > +
> > -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > -> subscribe/unsubscribe:
> http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > -> visit: on Fridays the Rhizome.org web site is open to non-members
> > +
> > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> > Membership Agreement available online at
> http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
> >
>
>