Ethan Ham
Since 2005
Works in New York, New York United States of America

PORTFOLIO (5)
BIO
Ethan Ham is a visual artist living in New York City. Ethan's former career as a game developer can be seen in the art he makes. The artworks often playful and demonstrate his continuing interest in the interaction between an artwork and its beholder. His work often explores themes of translation and mutation and take the form of literary/art hybrids, sculpture, and internet-based art. His art has been commissioned by Turbulence.org and Rhizome.org and has been exhibited at the PS122 Gallery (New York, NY), The National Portrait Gallery (Canberra, Australia), The Museum of Contemporary Art of Vojvodina (Novi Sad, Serbia), and on the websites of The Museum of Graphic Arts (Machida City, Japan) and The Museum of Contemporary Art (Badajoz, Spain).
Discussions (52) Opportunities (2) Events (1) Jobs (1)
DISCUSSION

Net 2.0 and new stuff


Hmm... Tom, I think we may be talking about two different things. By computer-based artists are you including artists who use computer-based tools but whose art doesn't require a computer as a medium (i.e., could just as easily be shown as a video, printed out, etc.)? For this discussion I was really thinking of artists who are using interactivity, data mining, etc. I wouldn't argue that an animator who happens to use Flash or Blender or whatever has a overwhelmingly compelling reason to learn to program.

DISCUSSION

Net 2.0 and new stuff


I don't really think it's about showing of technical chops (much less "fooling" people)... it's about being able to achieve the results one wants.

DISCUSSION

Net 2.0 and new stuff


Agreed... there's way too much art that out there that seems to be an excuse to put technology through it's paces. That art should come first--then hopefully the technical skills are there to see it through.

DISCUSSION

Net 2.0 and new stuff


Joe, I wouldn't steer artists towards learning C++, I just picked that language because it's low-level and can do pretty much anything... Javascript, Actionscript, Processing, etc. are probably more appropriate for most projects.

Sure, Cezanne, Warhol, & Pollack all worked paint differently--but that's really just extending the metaphor beyond usefulness (I think).

Look, if you can achieve artistically everything you want with Garbage Band or Blogger or whatever--great! No need to go further. And if you can find folks to do the time consuming work of programming your vision into reality, that's great too. But do you really think one is an effective technology-based artist if projects can't be done simply due to a lack of available programming skills?

Incidentally, I'm not suggesting that media artists who program are automatically better artists than those who don't... just that a media artist who programs are less limited than the same artist who doesn't.

DISCUSSION

Net 2.0 and new stuff


If D Z's first two questions are directed to me, I don't understand them.

What I mean by artist's effectiveness is the ability to be able to see through an idea or artistic intention. I was recently talking to an artist who has a project he'd like to do. But the project requires programming, and since the artist can't program he will either have to find a collaborator who can program or the money to pay for the programming. In all likelihood the project will never be done. This doesn't mean the artist isn't able to create some compelling artworks (and it would be silly to evaluate those artworks based on whether or not he programmed them from scratch), but clearly he has been limited by inability to program.

This isn't to say that every artist should learn to program... but it's certainly worth considering for artists who frequently work with computer technologies.