BIO
Ellis Hutch

I am an Australian artist, writer and performer who creates ephemeral, time-based video and installation works. My work is informed by a fascination with how people construct the places they inhabit and their social relationships. I have worked on a diverse range of collaborative and solo art projects since completing my Masters in Sculpture at the Australian National University School of Art in 2000. Currently I am a PhD student in the ANU School of Art, Photography and Media Arts Workshop and teach in the Art Theory and Sculpture Workshops.

Current work

"Close to the berg the pressure makes all sorts of quaint noises. We heard tapping as from a hammer, grunts, groans and squeaks, electric trams running, birds singing, kettles boiling noisily, and an occasional swish as a large piece of ice, released from pressure, suddenly jumped or turned over." Frank Worsley, Antarctica 1914

Frank Worsley's description of the sounds of an iceberg inspired me to turn to my immediate environment to generate images and installations that play at making sense of the remote and monumental through the familiar and the domestic. The sources for my current work are Antarctica and the Moon, two environments that are remote and extremely difficult to reach, yet 'inhabitable' to us through still and moving images, sound and text. The new worlds I am creating and sharing in the form of video and sound installations are informed by icebergs, mirages and space exploration; yet are generated from the inside of my refrigerator, the frost on the bonnet of my car and the puddles on the doorstep.