Ed Shanken
Since 2003
Works in SEattle, Washington United States of America

BIO
Edward A. Shanken writes and teaches about the entwinement of art, science, and technology with a focus on interdisciplinary practices involving new media. He is a researcher at the University of Amsterdam and a member of the Media Art History faculty at the Donau University in Krems, Austria. He was formerly Executive Director of the Information Science + Information Studies program at Duke University, and Professor of Art History and Media Theory at Savannah College of Art and Design. Recent and forthcoming publications include essays on art and technology in the 1960s, information aesthetics, interactivity and agency, and the cultural implications of cybernetics, robotics, and biotechnology. He edited Telematic Embrace: Visionary Theories of Art, Technology and Consciousness (University of California Press, 2003). His second book, Art and Electronic Media was published by Phaidon Press in 2009. Full CV available on my website.
Discussions (16) Opportunities (8) Events (15) Jobs (1)
DISCUSSION

EVENT

Ear to the Earth 2010: Yolande Harris and Bernie Krause


Dates:
Thu Oct 28, 2010 00:00 - Thu Oct 21, 2010

As part of Ear to the Earth 2010: Water and the World, Yolande Harris will perform in a program with legendary sound artist Bernie Krause at the Greenwich House Music School, 26 Barrow Street, 8pm.

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Harris' Pink Noise and Video Organ

Sailing, swimming and fishing highlight embodied and technological ways of knowing and relating to water environments, where sound forms a fundamental part of our experience. In her audio-visual work Yolande Harris addresses this otherwise alien environment, where water, wind and weather connect through the direct experience of undulating surface, breathing, equipment and navigation. Fishing for Sound creates a sea of spatial connections between phenomena underwater, in the mind, and from outer-space, weaving sounds from marine environments, psychological treatment and sonified navigation satellites. Common to each of these is a mass of background noise - of environment, memory and information - where listening is like fishing for sounds.

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Krause's Spectral map of animal sounds

Every stream, ocean, lake, beach, marsh, fen, and pool on earth has its own resonance and special geophonic voice, each soundscape adding another layer to the acoustic structures that engage us as music. Krause addresses the question of how animals (and water animals) taught us to dance and sing, drawing from his book, The Great Animal Orchestra: Finding the Origins of Music in the World’s Wild Places, due for publication by Little Brown (Hachette) in 2011. Find out how the organizational acoustic forms that have inspired human music can be found in the biophonies of rainforests, arctic regions, oceans, lakes, and riparian habitats worldwide.

Yolande Harris
Amsterdam-based composer/sound artist Yolande Harris works with sound and image in environment and architectural space. She has presented her work internationally, at MACBA, Schirn Kunsthalle, ISEA, Sonic Acts, and Transmediale, and she has received fellowships at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne, Jan van Eyck Academy, and Netherlands Media Art Institute.

Bernie Krause
Since 1968, Bernie Krause has traveled the world, recording and archiving the sounds of creatures and environments large and small. He has produced 55 CDs and creates interactive environmental sound sculptures for public spaces worldwide. He is currently engaged in writing a book titled The Great Animal Orchestra: Finding the Origins of Music in the World’s Wild Places. Krause is also a pioneering performer on synthesizer, who introduced Beatle George Harrison to the instrument in 1968, and has many credits in popular music and film.


EVENT

ART BASEL - Contemporary Art and New Media: Toward a Hybrid Discourse


Dates:
Sat Jun 19, 2010 00:00 - Thu Jun 10, 2010

Location:
Switzerland

Curator Nicolas Bourriaud, ZKM CEO Peter Weibel, and artist Michael Joaquin Grey will address the topic, "Contemporary Art and New Media: Toward a Hybrid Discourse?" at Art Basel on Saturday 19, June, 1-1:30 pm. The discussion is being convened and moderated by Edward A. Shanken.

Contemporary Art and New Media: Toward a Hybrid Discourse?

Since the mid-1990s, new media has become an important force for creative culture and economic development. Supporting institutions including Ars Electronica, ZKM and Eyebeam have expanded, while interdisciplinary Ph.D. programs at the intersections of art, science, and technology have proliferated internationally. Simultaneously, mainstream contemporary art experienced dramatic growth, propelled by the proliferation of venues from Art Basel Miami to the Shanghai Biennial and by the creativity of artists, curators, dealers and pedagogues. Yet rarely do these two artworlds meet. As a result, their discourses have increasingly diverged. To what extent are new media art and mainstream contemporary art commensurable? Is it possible to construct a hybrid discourse that offers insights into each, while enabling greater mixing between them? What roles have educational programs and cultural institutions played in fostering these divides and how can they contribute to suturing them? What insights into larger questions of emerging art and cultural forms might be gleaned by such a rapprochement?


OPPORTUNITY

New Media, Art-Science, and Mainstream Contemporary Art: Toward a Hybrid Discourse?


Deadline:
Mon May 03, 2010 00:00

2011 Call for Participation:

New Media, Art-Science, and Mainstream Contemporary Art: Toward a Hybrid Discourse?

Chair: Edward A. Shanken,

Leonardo Education and Art Forum (LEAF) Special Session
CAA 99th Annual Conference
New York, NY, February 9-12, 2011

PROPOSALS FOR PAPERS TO SESSION CHAIR, Due May 3, 2010

(Note: open only to members of the Leonardo Education and Art Forum (LEAF) or College Art Association)

Since the mid-1990s, new media has become an important force for economic and cultural development, establishing its own institutions, such as the ZKM, Ars Electronic Center, and Eyebeam. Research at the intersections of art, science, and technology also has gained esteem and institutional support, as demonstrated by the Artists in Labs program (Switzerland) and the proliferation of interdisciplinary Ph.D. programs around the world. During the same period, mainstream contemporary art experienced dramatic growth in its market and popularity, propelled by economic prosperity and the proliferation of international museums, art fairs and exhibitions from the Tate Modern to Art Basel Miami to the Shanghai Biennial. This dynamic environment has nurtured tremendous creativity and invention by artists, curators, theorists and pedagogues in all branches. Yet rarely does the mainstream artworld converge with the new media and art-sci artworlds. As a result, their discourses have become increasingly divergent.

Contemporary art practice and writing are remarkably rich but often lack understanding of science or technology and the interdisciplinary artistic practices and critical discourses that are co-extensive with them. Art-science and new media art offer valuable insights into the implications of science and technology and expand the possibilities of art. However, these discourses often display an impoverished understanding of aesthetic and theoretical developments in contemporary art, resulting in work that fails to resonate in that context.

This LEAF-sponsored session at CAA shall interrogate the extent to which the discourses of art-science, new media art and mainstream contemporary art are commensurable. Is it possible to construct a hybrid discourse that offers nuanced insights into each, while laying a foundation for greater mixing between them? What role have educational programs played in fostering these divides and how can they contribute to dissolving them? What insights into larger questions of emerging art and cultural forms might be gleaned by such a rapprochement?

Every proposal should include the following six items:
1. Completed session participation proposal form, located at the end of linked .pdf.
2. Preliminary abstract of one to two double-spaced, typed pages.
3. Letter explaining speaker’s interest, expertise in the topic, and CAA/LEAF membership status.
4. CV with home and office mailing addresses, email address, and phone and fax numbers. Include summer address and telephone number, if applicable.
5. Documentation of work when appropriate, especially for sessions in which artists might discuss their own work.
6. If mailing internationally, it is recommended that proposals be sent via certified mail or via email.

Follow this link to .pdf of CAA CFP for more details:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/yktzdpd

Edward Shanken
Universitair Docent, New Media
Turfdraagsterpad 9
University of Amsterdam
1012XT Amsterdam, NL

http://artexetra.com


EVENT

Cubinator


Dates:
Sat Apr 17, 2010 00:00 - Tue Apr 13, 2010

Sarah Moore and Marta Colpani present Cubinator, live on the Internet and on location in Amsterdam.

The actual performance will be available on the Cubinator website on the 17th of April at 19:00 (Amsterdam time). We will be live for 24 hours on this webpage, and we will be building a paper structure for you. Every brick that you ask us to build will be only yours, and will be marked with the exact time of your submission.

You are kindly invited to participate!

Cubinator is a course project for Scopic Regimes of Virtuality, New Media MA program, University of Amsterdam.

http://www.scopicregimesvirtuality.worpress.com
New Media MA Blog: http://mastersofmedia.hum.uva.nl/