BIO
Domenico Quaranta (1978, Brescia, Italy, http://domenicoquaranta.com) is an art critic and curator. He is a regular contributor to Flash Art and Artpulse. He is the editor (with M. Bittanti) of the book GameScenes: Art in the Age of Videogames (2006) and the author of Media, New Media, Postmedia (2010) and In Your Computer (2011). He has curated various exhibitions, including Holy Fire: Art of the Digital Age (Bruxelles 2008, with Y. Bernard), Playlist (Gijon 2009 and Bruxelles 2010) and Collect the WWWorld (Brescia 2011 and Basel 2012). He is a co-founder of the Link Center for the Arts of the Information Age (http://www.linkartcenter.eu/).

My Life Without Technoviking: An Interview with Matthias Fritsch


Matthias Fritsch is an independent artist from Berlin, most well known for his work Kneecam No 1—the live video that brought Technoviking to the internet. Over a decade after he uploaded the clip that went viral, Fritsch now is enduring a long legal battle with Technoviking himself, who sued for the reproduction, proliferation, and unwarranted use of his likeness. In response to the process, Fritsch is making The Story of Technoviking, a crowd-funded documentary that aims to shed light on the legal issues surrounding viral images. Below, Fritsch talks about what it’s like do battle in court with a viking, the ownership of images in the internet age, and hopes for his current project.

My Life Without Technoviking—since the trial began, Fritsch is no longer allowed to use images of the plaintiff's face.

DQ: Matthias, I'm of course curious about the video that originated it all. What was, for you, Kneecam No 1 (2000) before it became an internet meme? Why did you upload it to YouTube? Were you expecting such a viral reaction? What did you think when it happened?


What's (Really) Specific about New Media Art? Curating in the Information Age


This text has been written for the proceedings of the international conference "New Perspectives, New Technologies", organized by the Doctoral School Ca' Foscari - IUAV in Arts History and held in Venice and Pordenone, Italy in October 2011


The "portal" designed by Antenna Design to show net based art in the exhibition "Art Entertainment Network", Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 2000. Courtesy Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

 

In the late nineties and during the first decade of this century the term “new media art” became the established label for that broad range of artistic practices that includes works that are created, or in some way deal with, new media technologies. Providing a more detailed definition here would inevitably mean addressing topics beyond the scope of this paper, that I discussed extensively in my book Media, New Media, Postmedia (Quaranta 2010). By way of introduction to the issues discussed in this paper, we can summarize the main argument put forward in the book: that this label, and the practices it applies to, developed mostly in an enclosed social context, sometimes called the “new media art niche”, but that would be better described as an art world in its own right, with its own institutions, professionals, discussion platforms, audience, and economic model, and its own idea of what art is and should be; and that only in recent years has the practice managed to break out of this world, and get presented on the wider platform of contemporary art.

It was at this point in time, and mainly thanks to curators who were actively involved in the presentation of new media art in the contemporary art arena, that the debate about “curating new media (art)” took shape. This debate was triggered by the pioneering work of curators – from Steve Dietz to Jon Ippolito, Benjamin Weil and Christiane Paul – who at the turn of the millennium curated seminal new media art exhibitions for contemporary art museums; and it was – and still is –nurtured by CRUMB - “Curatorial Resource for Upstart Media Bliss” - a platform and mailing list founded by Beryl Graham and Sarah Cook in 2000 within the School of Arts, Design, Media and Culture at the University of Sunderland, UK. As early as 2001, CRUMB organized the first ever meeting of new media curators in the UK as part of BALTIC's pre-opening program – a seminar on Curating New Media held in May 2001.

In the context of this paper, our main reference texts will be CRUMB-related publications, from the proceedings of “Curating New Media” (2001) to Rethinking Curating. Art After New Media (2010), a recent book by Beryl Graham and Sarah Cook; and New Media in the White Cube and Beyond, a book edited by Christiane Paul in 2008. Instead of addressing the specific issues and curatorial models discussed in these publications, we will try to focus on the very foundations of “curating new media”, exploring questions like: does new media art require a specific curatorial model? Does this curatorial model follow the way artists working with new media currently present themselves on the contemporary art platform? How much could “new media art” benefit from a non-specialized approach? Are we curating “new media” or curating “art”? ...


The Postmedia Perspective


The following excerpt comes from the final chapter of my book Media, New Media, Postmedia, recently published in Italian by Postmediabooks, who kindly gave Rhizome permission to republish it in English. The book is an attempt to analyze the current positioning of so-called “New Media Art” in the wider field of contemporary arts, and to explore the historical, sociological and conceptual reasons for its marginal position and under-recognition in recent art history.



Discussions (51) Opportunities (5) Events (38) Jobs (0)
OPPORTUNITY

“In My Computer” Book Series – Call for Proposals 2014


Deadline:
Wed Jan 15, 2014 00:00

The Link Center for the Arts of the Information Age invites you to submit proposals for its ongoing book series “In My Computer”.

One's computer is a repository of valuable things that, for some reason, never went public: unpublished projects, drafts, short notes, private emails, unreleased interviews and texts, tales, poems, quotes, image or spam email collections, whatever.
If you think this content may be significant also for a wider audience and may work well in book form, the book series “In My Computer” may be the right jar for your jam.

“In My Computer” is a series of books collecting unpublished material available in your computer, produced by Link Editions and available for free download in digital form and in printed form through the print-on-demand (POD) service Lulu.com and Amazon.com. The concept wants to give value to the contents stored on our computer, a personal archive that is, from time to time, a den for our researches, a private diary, a place of accumulation and storage of digital contents. Since the distinction between public and private, online and offline is becoming increasingly blurred, the series is open to contents circulated online in any form. In this perspective, the book is an extraordinary tool for the rematerialization of the ephemeral, for archiving the impermanent, and for ordering the digital chaos we are living in.

Link Editions (http://editions.linkartcenter.eu/) is a publishing initiative of the Link Center for the Arts of the Information Age. Link Editions uses the print on demand approach to create an accessible, dynamic series of essays and pamphlets, but also catalogues and artist books. A keen advocate of the idea that information wants to be free, Link Editions releases its contents free of charge in .pdf format, and on paper at a price accessible to all. Link Editions is a not-for-profit initiative and all its contents are circulated under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) license. More info: http://www.linkartcenter.eu/.

Application guidelines:

1. The applicant is invited to send, via e-mail to the address info@linkartcenter.eu before January 15, 2014, the application in a single file (doc or pdf), filled with:

- a short concept (max 2000 chars);
- a short author bio (max 1000 chars);
- other materials (images, sample pages, excerpts) or links to other materials that can be useful for a better understanding and evaluation of the submitted work.

The application should be submitted in English.

2. “In My Computer” is an “artist books” series, but it is also open to proposals from theoreticians, designers and other creatives, provided that what they are submitting is not an essay or a collection of essays (for which Link Editions has a dedicated series, “Clouds”, also open to submissions).

3. After the deadline, Link Editions' editorial staff will select the proposals we want to publish along 2014, and will announce the result of the selection process by the end of February 2014. Link Editions reserves the right not to select a specific number of applications, but to decide how many proposals to select on the basis of the quality and viability of the proposals.

4. The winning projects will be published by Link Editions along 2014. Link Editions' editorial staff will cooperate with the author in the work on the layout, while the cover will follow the design of the other books in the series. The book can take any shape compatible with POD's production and distribution standards. (cf. http://bit.ly/jgcZxS).

“In My Computer” Book Series

More info on the books available on http://editions.linkartcenter.eu/

In My Computer # 1
Miltos Manetas, In My Computer, LINK Editions, Brescia 2011. Soft cover, 102 pages, English, € 12.00, ISBN: 978-1-4477-1939-7.

In My Computer # 2
Chris Coy, After Brad Troemel, Link Editions, Brescia 2013. Soft cover, 288 pp, English, € 15.00, ISBN 9781291404098.

In My Computer # 3
Martin Howse, Diff in June, Link Editions, Brescia 2013. Soft cover, 740 pp, English, 35,71 €, ISBN 9781291503593.

Upcoming in November: In My Computer # 4
Damiano Nava, Let the Right One In, Link Editions, Brescia 2013.


DISCUSSION

Link Editions releases Beyond New Media Art, by Domenico Quaranta


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Domenico Quaranta, Beyond New Media Art, Link Editions, Brescia 2013. English, soft cover, 290 pp. 15.00 €, ISBN 9781291376975

Link Editions is proud to announce the release of "Beyond New Media Art", by Domenico Quaranta.

"Beyond New Media Art" is the revised, updated version of a book first published in Italian with the title "Media, New Media, Postmedia" (Postmedia Books, Milan 2010). Through the circulation of excerpts, reviews and interviews, the book produced some debate outside of Italy, which persuaded the author to release, three years later, this English translation.

"Beyond New Media Art" is an attempt to analyze the current positioning of so-called New Media Art in the wider field of contemporary arts, and to explore the historical, sociological and conceptual reasons for its marginal position and under-recognition in recent art history. On the other hand, this book is also an attempt to suggest new critical and curatorial strategies to turn this marginalization into a thing of the past, and to stress the topicality of art addressing the media and the issues of the information age.

From the book's preface: "So what is New Media Art? What does this term really describe? And what has occasioned the schism between this term and the art scene it is supposed to describe? And lastly, what accounts for the limited presence in critical debate of an artistic practice that appears to have all the credentials for representing an era in which digital media are powerfully reshaping the political, economic, social and cultural organization of the world we live in?"

Domenico Quaranta (http://domenicoquaranta.com) is an art critic and curator. His work focuses on the impact of the current techno-social developments on the arts. He regularly writes for Flash Art and Artpulse. In 2006 he edited (with M. Bittanti) the book "GameScenes. Art in the Age of Videogames"; in 2010, he published the book "Media, New Media, Postmedia". As a curator, he organized various shows, including "Holy Fire. Art of the Digital Age" (Bruxelles 2008, with Y. Bernard), "Playlist" (Gijon 2009 and Bruxelles 2010) and "Collect the WWWorld. The Artist as Archivist in the Internet Age" (Brescia 2011; Basel and New York, 2012).

Link Editions (http://editions.linkartcenter.eu) is a publishing initiative of the Link Center for the Arts of the Information Age. Link Editions uses print on demand and digital formats to create an accessible, dynamic series of essays and pamphlets, but also artist books, catalogues and conference proceedings. A keen advocate of the idea that information wants to be free, Link Editions releases its contents free of charge in .pdf format, and on paper at a price accessible to all. Link Editions is a not-for-profit initiative and all its contents are circulated under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) license.

Until June 15, all Link Editions books will be available on Lulu.com with a 20% discount.

More info, buy and download:

http://www.linkartcenter.eu/
http://editions.linkartcenter.eu/
www.lulu.com/spotlight/linkeditions
http://issuu.com/linkeditions

EVENT

Link Editions releases After Brad Troemel, by Chris Coy


Dates:
Wed May 15, 2013 16:30 - Sat Jun 15, 2013

Chris Coy, After Brad Troemel, Link Editions, Brescia 2013. Soft cover, 288 pp, English, € 15.00, ISBN 9781291404098.

Link Editions is proud to announce the release of "After Brad Troemel", by US based artist Chris Coy. The book is the first of a selection made out of an open call for proposals, by a jury including Andreas Broeckmann, Ben Fino-Radin and Domenico Quaranta, to be released in our series "In My Computer" along 2013.

"After Brad Troemel" (ABT) is an artist book conceived for the JstChillin exhibition "Read/Write" at 319 Scholes in Brooklyn in 2011. The book - originally published in a limited edition of 20 - took as its conceptual core the characterization of artist Brad Troemel as a genius and a mastermind analyzed through the lens of conspiracy theory and amateur internet sleuthing. According to artist and writer Artie Vierkant, who wrote the introduction to this edition, ABT is not "about Brad Troemel, nor any of the myriad names or identities that are mentioned in its pages. ABT is about the construction of identity in a mediated public space - largely concerned with social interactions on the Internet, but most prominently through textual and visual communication. If it could be said to be about Brad Troemel, or even about Chris Coy himself, then these two are taken as case studies of two very divergent methods of approaching mediated identity."

The book, which disappeared from circulation soon after its first release, is now made available by Link Editions as a print-on-demand paperback through Lulu.com, and as a freely downloadable PDF available on Lulu.com, Issuu.com and on Link Editions' website.

Chris Coy (www.seecoy.com) is an artist and filmmaker currently living and working in Las Vegas. He has shown work at the New Museum in New York, the Sundance Film Festival, the Netherlands Media Art Institute and numerous international art festivals and group exhibitions.

In My Computer is a series of books collecting unpublished material available in your computer. The book can take any shape compatible with POD's production and distribution standards. A new call for proposals will be announced soon.
Link Editions (http://editions.linkartcenter.eu) is a publishing initiative of the Link Center for the Arts of the Information Age. Link Editions uses print on demand and digital formats to create an accessible, dynamic series of essays and pamphlets, but also artist books, catalogues and conference proceedings. A keen advocate of the idea that information wants to be free, Link Editions releases its contents free of charge in .pdf format, and on paper at a price accessible to all. Link Editions is a not-for-profit initiative and all its contents are circulated under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0) license.

Until June 15, all Link Editions books will be available onLulu.com with a 20% discount.

More info, buy and download:

http://www.linkartcenter.eu/
http://editions.linkartcenter.eu/
www.lulu.com/spotlight/linkeditions
http://issuu.com/linkeditions


OPPORTUNITY

Open Call: Make Them More Transformative!


Deadline:
Tue Dec 31, 2013 00:00

According to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, these five works of Appropriation Art are not enough transformative. Please help Richard Prince and make them more transformative! Applications to be submitted to http://afterprince.tumblr.com/submit

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«For the reasons discussed, we hold that all except five (Graduation, Meditation, Canal Zone (2007), Canal Zone (2008), and Charlie Company) of Prince’s artworks make fair use of Cariou’s photographs. We express no view as to whether the five are also entitled to a fair use defense. We REMAND with respect to those five so that the district court, applying the proper standard, can determine in the first instance whether any of them infringes on Cariou’s copyrights or whether Prince is entitled to a fair use defense with regard to those artworks as well. The judgment of the district court is REVERSED in part and VACATED in part. The case is REMANDED for further proceedings consistent with this opinion.»


DISCUSSION

What's (Really) Specific about New Media Art? Curating in the Information Age


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Dear Sarah,

thanks for your comment! Let me start saying that, if compared with the amount of research required by the books I discussed, my texts is nothing more that a modest footnote to each of them. You probably know better than me how difficult it is to sum up such a complicated issue in such a small space, and this is why I willingly adopted an affirmative, manifesto-style approach. I agree that we are on the same boat, but I also know that, when one speaks, sometimes it all depends on where she puts the stress. And when you start a book with a sentence like this, in my opinion, you put the stress on the wrong thing, in a way that can't but give birth to a series of misunderstandings:

“[...] in this book, what is meant by the term new media art is, broadly, art that is made using electronic media technology and that displays any or all of the three behaviours of interactivity, connectivity and computability, in any combination.”

I'm just trying to move the stress onward on the "art" part of the "new media art" label. I'm sure that the same issues has been touched many times in the debate around new media curating, but it always happened under the same premise: that new media art is technology-based and that presentations that avoid technology are the result of an act of mediation (a word often replaced with pejorative versions of it). The very fact that the word "art" doesn't appear that often ("Curating New Media" [the book], "New Media Curating" [the mailing list], "New Media in the White Cube and Beyond", "Art after New Media") changes the perception of anything you can say under these headlines.
My feeling is that, if you change the premise, you can later discuss how to bring interactive, computable, online works in the exhibition space in the few cases it is really required. But if you don't, "new media curating" will always be a Sisyphean labor and a pointless effort that doesn't actually help, and maybe damages, the art it wants to support.

Domenico