D. Jean Hester
Since 2002
Works in Los Angeles, California United States of America

BIO
D. Jean Hester is a media artist living in Los Angeles, California, whose work combines programming, databases, film and video to create interactive pieces for both physical installations and online platforms.

Hester wishes to involve users as active, thinking, engaged participant-collaborators in the creation of art. Her work explores the nature of interactivity and audience/user participation, and what happens when a work is no longer a stand-alone authored environment with a tightly controlled author-defined outcome, but when the users themselves are contributing/collaborating through the use of interactivity (be it physical real-world performative actions or interaction with a database or some other program). In this scenario the artist's intention is only part of the puzzle
Discussions (12) Opportunities (0) Events (3) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: invitation to participate: your favorite four letter words


so i should just go through the rhizome list and add all four letter names
then? oh, but i need to add "eryk" twice... ;)

-- D. Jean Hester
www.divestudio.org
Interviewer: "Must an artist be a programmer to make truly original online
art?"
John Simon: "Truly original? You Modernist! Whether you make art or not,
understanding programming is an amazing understanding."
from "Code as Creative Writing: An Interview with John Simon"

>From: "Ivan Pope" <ivan@ivanpope.com>
>Reply-To: "Ivan Pope" <ivan@ivanpope.com>
>To: "neil jenkins" <neil@devoid.co.uk>, "rhizome" <list@rhizome.org>
>CC: "marc.garrett" <marc.garrett@furtherfield.org>
>Subject: Re: RHIZOME_RAW: invitation to participate: your favorite four
>letter words
>Date: Thu, 17 Apr 2003 06:20:11 +0100
>
>ivan &/or pope
>
>
>--
>Ivan Pope
>ivan@ivanpope.com
>www.ivanpope.com
>www.tochki-inc.com
>
>"Faster, faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death"
>Hunter S. Thompson
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "neil jenkins" <neil@devoid.co.uk>
>To: "rhizome" <list@rhizome.org>
>Cc: "marc.garrett" <marc.garrett@furtherfield.org>
>Sent: Thursday, April 17, 2003 12:32 PM
>Subject: Re: RHIZOME_RAW: invitation to participate: your favorite four
>letter words
>
>
> > neil
> >
> > :)
> >
> >
> > On Thursday, April 17, 2003, at 11:40 am, marc.garrett wrote:
> >
> > > mine is 'marc'
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >>
> > >> "Eryk" is my favorite four letter word.
> > >>
> > >> -e.
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> ----- Original Message -----
> > >> From: "D. Jean Hester" <jenajunk@hotmail.com>
> > >> To: <list@rhizome.org>
> > >> Sent: Wednesday, April 16, 2003 4:08 PM
> > >> Subject: RHIZOME_RAW: invitation to participate: your favorite four
> > >> letter
> > >> words
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>> Hey Rhizomers,
> > >>>
> > >>> I'd like to ask you to contribute/participate in my latest
> > >>> collaborative-participative-what-the-hell-is-it-ART-THANG. (FYI, I
> > >>> have
> > >>> included my bio at the end of this email.)
> > >>>
> > >>> It's SO EASY: send me a list of your favorite four letter words (as
> > > many
> > >> or
> > >>> as few as you want). Yeah, and remember, four letter doesn't have
>to
> > > mean
> > >>> f*ck, sh*t, d*mn, although those certainly are glorious four letter
> > > words.
> > >>> Hand, post, June, list, dive, chow, Oslo, poke are all perfectly
> > >> reasonable
> > >>> four letter words as well.
> > >>>
> > >>> The words will be used in a video installation planned for a
> > >>> music/video/art/dance-like-crazy-people event at the Hollywood
> > >>> Athletic
> > >> Club
> > >>> in Los Angeles for May 17. The words will be placed in a database,
> > >>> and
> > >>> reconfigured in odd random pairings based on an algorithm, along
>with
> > > odd
> > >>> random pairings of video footage.
> > >>>
> > >>> Thanks, and send those words in to jenajunk@hotmail.com! I need a
> > >>> lot
> > > of
> > >>> them...
> > >>>
> > >>> BIO: <warning: art jargon ahead>
> > >>> D. Jean Hester is a media artist living in Los Angeles, California,
> > > whose
> > >>> work combines programming, databases, film and video to create
> > > interactive
> > >>> pieces for both physical installations and online platforms. Hester
> > >> wishes
> > >>> to involve users as active, thinking, engaged
> > >>> participant-collaborators
> > > in
> > >>> the creation of art. Her work explores the nature of interactivity
> > >>> and
> > >>> audience/user participation, and what happens when a work is no
> > >>> longer a
> > >>> stand-alone authored environment with a tightly controlled
> > > author-defined
> > >>> outcome, but when the users themselves are
>contributing/collaborating
> > >>> through the use of interactivity (be it physical real-world
> > >>> performative
> > >>> actions or interaction with a database or some other program). In
> > >>> this
> > >>> scenario the artist's intention is only part of the puzzle - the art
> > > does
> > >>> not exist until it is engaged. Without a user as a contributor, it
> > >>> is
> > >> only
> > >>> a potentiality - not an actuality. Her work has been shown in
> > >>> numerous
> > >>> exhibits, festivals, and screenings in the United States, Canada,
>and
> > >>> Mexico, and can be seen online at www.divestudio.org.
> > >>>
> > >>> -- D. Jean Hester
> > >>> www.divestudio.org
> > >>> Interviewer: "Must an artist be a programmer to make truly original
> > > online
> > >>> art?"
> > >>> John Simon: "Truly original? You Modernist! Whether you make art or
> > >>> not,
> > >>> understanding programming is an amazing understanding."
> > >>> from "Code as Creative Writing: An Interview with John Simon"
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>>
> > >>> _________________________________________________________________
> > >>> Tired of spam? Get advanced junk mail protection with MSN 8.
> > >>> http://join.msn.com/?pagethatures/junkmail
> > >>>
> > >>> + ti esrever dna ti pilf nwod gniht ym tup
> > >>> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > >>> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > >>> -> subscribe/unsubscribe:
> > >>> http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> > >>> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > >>> +
> > >>> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> > >>> Membership Agreement available online at
> > >>> http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
> > >>>
> > >>
> > >> + ti esrever dna ti pilf nwod gniht ym tup
> > >> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > >> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > >> -> subscribe/unsubscribe:
> > >> http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> > >> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > >> +
> > >> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> > >> Membership Agreement available online at
> > >> http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > + ti esrever dna ti pilf nwod gniht ym tup
> > > -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > > -> subscribe/unsubscribe:
>http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> > > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > > +
> > > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> > > Membership Agreement available online at
>http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
> > >
> >
> > + ti esrever dna ti pilf nwod gniht ym tup
> > -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > +
> > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> > Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
> >
>
>+ ti esrever dna ti pilf nwod gniht ym tup
>-> post: list@rhizome.org
>-> questions: info@rhizome.org
>-> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
>-> give: http://rhizome.org/support
>+
>Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
>Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php

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DISCUSSION

invitation to participate: your favorite four letter words


Hey Rhizomers,

I'd like to ask you to contribute/participate in my latest
collaborative-participative-what-the-hell-is-it-ART-THANG. (FYI, I have
included my bio at the end of this email.)

It's SO EASY: send me a list of your favorite four letter words (as many or
as few as you want). Yeah, and remember, four letter doesn't have to mean
f*ck, sh*t, d*mn, although those certainly are glorious four letter words.
Hand, post, June, list, dive, chow, Oslo, poke are all perfectly reasonable
four letter words as well.

The words will be used in a video installation planned for a
music/video/art/dance-like-crazy-people event at the Hollywood Athletic Club
in Los Angeles for May 17. The words will be placed in a database, and
reconfigured in odd random pairings based on an algorithm, along with odd
random pairings of video footage.

Thanks, and send those words in to jenajunk@hotmail.com! I need a lot of
them...

BIO: <warning: art jargon ahead>
D. Jean Hester is a media artist living in Los Angeles, California, whose
work combines programming, databases, film and video to create interactive
pieces for both physical installations and online platforms. Hester wishes
to involve users as active, thinking, engaged participant-collaborators in
the creation of art. Her work explores the nature of interactivity and
audience/user participation, and what happens when a work is no longer a
stand-alone authored environment with a tightly controlled author-defined
outcome, but when the users themselves are contributing/collaborating
through the use of interactivity (be it physical real-world performative
actions or interaction with a database or some other program). In this
scenario the artist's intention is only part of the puzzle

DISCUSSION

Re: Dia article in NYTimes Mag


I am not sure why someone, given the chance, would NOT want the daily
drudgery, etc etc, swept away so that they could focus on their art. Isn't
that the impetus behind artist retreats, to have time to focus, away from
the ringing phone, the day job, the gas bill that needs paying? Isn't that
one of the things that drives people into grad school programs, that promise
of TIME to focus? (At least that is the primary attraction of grad school
for me...) Isn't that the dream/fantasy driving the purchase of lottery
tickets?

Yes the daily grind does inform the work, yes daily life is a crucial
element. But being able to change the balance from 80% daily grind/20% art
to the opposite would be nirvana (at least for me).

That said, being free of the worries of rent is not the same thing as
"ascending the ivory tower to live in intellectual, abstract realms". The
way I approach my work, the ideas I am interested in, the processes I use,
what I believe in, would not change were I suddenly given a patron with deep
pockets. I would just spend one hell of a lot more time on my art, and a
lot less at the evil day job.

If anyone knows of a patron who needs a starving media artist to make their
life fuller and of more value, send them my way... ;)

-- D. Jean Hester
www.divestudio.org
Interviewer: "Must an artist be a programmer to make truly original online
art?"
John Simon: "Truly original? You Modernist! Whether you make art or not,
understanding programming is an amazing understanding."
from "Code as Creative Writing: An Interview with John Simon"

>From: "t.whid" <twhid@mteww.com>
>Reply-To: "t.whid" <twhid@mteww.com>
>To: "t.whid" <twhid@mteww.com>
>CC: list@rhizome.org
>Subject: Re: RHIZOME_RAW: Dia article in NYTimes Mag
>Date: Tue, 8 Apr 2003 18:54:33 -0400
>
>hi all,
>
>Sorry I keep harping on this but I don't think what I was originally
>questioning was addressed.
>
>Lets put aside all the collaborative, open source, community oriented, and
>yet-to-be-invented models of cultural production and remember what the Dia
>did for these lucky artists in the early 70s. They gave them the time and
>means to pursue their grandest visions without encumbrance. They didn't
>have to worry about raising money from investors, writing grant proposals,
>organizing teams to build parts of their work; they simply had to worry
>about their vision.
>
>The Dia attempted to remove all obstacles btw the artist and his vision.
>The artists were free to ascend the ivory tower and live in intellectual,
>abstract realms. Would this sort of ivory tower be beneficial for
>net/web/new media artists? Should net/web/new media artists have the daily
>drudgery swept away? Does the daily hubbub inform our art in a essential
>way? Do artists need to mix with the hoi polloi?
>--
><t.whid>
>www.mteww.com
></t.whid>
>
>+ ti esrever dna ti pilf nwod gniht ym tup
>-> post: list@rhizome.org
>-> questions: info@rhizome.org
>-> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
>-> give: http://rhizome.org/support
>+
>Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
>Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php

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DISCUSSION

Acess and Power (was After Rhizome)


Not sure this post is wise as my debut on this list, but what the heck.
"DIVE!" I always say. So here I go...

I was determined not to add to the "after Rhizome" thread. I was thankful
to Vladimir for the original post since I was unaware of the membership
agreement terms. I was thankful to Curt for throwing some humor into the
situation. I was thankful for the passion that was on the list (no matter
how self-referential). But I didn't think I had anything to add.

But I have been thinking about it, and I decided to throw in my two cents.

It seems the discomfort people have with the direction of Rhizome has to do
with issues of power and access. I also sense some nostalgia, some
revisionist history of the "good old days" of both the internet and Rhizome
going on... (of course what wasn't spectacular about 1997/98/99 compared to
the doldrums and anxiety of 2003?)

Rhizome is/was (depending on your viewpoint) a powerful platform. It
has/had many influential, intelligent, insightful people discussing,
contributing, debating, shaping the direction of net art.

So much of life (and the net art/art world is no exception) is about access
to power. And by "power" I mean resources and platforms and people to
enable you to get your ideas/art across to a wider audience. Artists have
traditionally needed galleries, selective venues, dealers, publishers,
intermediaries of all kinds in order to advance their artwork to the wider
public. When unable to get access to these resources, artists have
traditionally sought out alternative ways of finding platforms/audiences
(which often seem to get co-opted by the established institutions at some
point but I won't get into that here.)

For many of us, the internet seemed to change that balance, seemed to be
that alternative venue that also had the advantage of a wide audience. We
suddenly had access to some power - the power of the platform of the
internet. It was "our" alternative venue. We could set up sites, share our
work, our ideas, our vision with anyone - we only had to gain some technical
expertise, and pay for some web space. We could post to email lists with
abandon. There were no gatekeepers, we didn't have to schmooze some gallery
owner to get a show, you didn't have to convince some art school to let you
in, you didn't have to have an MFA, you didn't have to know the "right"
people,etc. We had power because we had access to a platform from which we
could share our ideas and work. Power to the people and all that.

Rhizome was part of that (as well as nettime, and other mailing lists and
forums now defunct).

And now some people feel that the access to the Rhizome platform (and the
influence/audience that platform implies) is restricted. And they are
right. Access is restricted. You have to pay $5. You can post to the
list, but your post may never make it past the Rhizome RAW to the Rhizome
RARE list. No one may ever read what you have to say.

But I would like to point out that access has always been restricted.
Access to the power has always been controlled. None of this was ever as
perfect and freewheeling as we all have nostalgically reconstructed in our
memories. Other than that $5 barrier, is anything on Rhizome really
different now? Were any of you ever happy with how Mark Tribe et al
responded to "community" concerns in the past? How many times did your
ideas get on RARE? What about those plaintive newbies whose posts never
made it past the moderators?

And what about this "open" forum, the internet that is open to everyone
everywhere? Is it really? Isn't is also a restricted, self-selecting
audience? What about the person with no tech skills and no money? Do they
have access to the platform?

All the more reason to create something that actually *does* create a
platform we can *all* access, and share, and use to get our ideas out there.

It's time for us to stop mourning the loss of some golden age of Rhizome and
the net, and create some new realities. Create new power-sharing
structures, create new communities, create new ways of relating and sharing,
create new platforms and venues and networks for us to share our work and
ideas.

It's STILL power to the people, but only if we do something about creating
our own power and our own platforms, and stop depending on others to do it
for us.

<end of rah rah>

Respectfully,

-- D. Jean Hester
www.divestudio.org
Interviewer: "Must an artist be a programmer to make truly original online
art?"
John Simon: "Truly original? You Modernist! Whether you make art or not,
understanding programming is an amazing understanding."
from "Code as Creative Writing: An Interview with John Simon"

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EVENT

"Notice" -- Art Exhibit and Opening


Dates:
Fri Mar 07, 2003 00:00 - Thu Feb 27, 2003

Notice