Cinque Hicks
Since the beginning
Works in Austin United States of America

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DISCUSSION

We All Are Global Nomads--Event Photos!


***Apologies for any duplicate mailings***

Photos from the April 19, 2003 Austin debut of "We All Are Global
Nomads" have been posted to the web site. Check them out here:

http://66.107.28.199/en/pastEvents/

Thanks to all who participated and all who visited!

ch

===================================================
We All Are Global Nomads
The World is a Vast Desert of Cyberspace--Roam Free
http://www.weallareglobalnomads.com
===================================================

A. Cinque Hicks
http://www.cinquehicks.com
cinque@cinquehicks.com

DISCUSSION

New and Improved--We All Are Global Nomads


***I apologize for cross-postings.***
======================================================================

Everyone,

Please look again--Easier to use.
Bitte Blick wieder--Probleme gelost.
Por favor mirada otra vez--

OPPORTUNITY

The Tribe Grows, Wanders, Moves


Deadline:
Sun Mar 30, 2003 16:52

I'd love it if you all took a moment to check this out. Thanks! -ch

==============================================================================

What's outside your window right now?

>"In our small garden, flowers are growing, but we fear for the bombs at night."
-Amal
Baghdad, Iraq

>"There are huge red produce trucks, ragged homeless people, 4 newborn puppies, and shiny new art, dim cafes, galleries, and old warehouses that hold the hopeful heart of L.A..."
-WildGoddess
Los Angeles, USA

>"An electrical storm rages over an empty rainswept street just off Darling Harbour where I'm staying for the night before bouncing home over the Tasman to Auckland. Beyond that are concentric circles and radial vectors, circles within waves, and something's coming."
-ogamu
Sydney, Australia

==============================================================================
http://www.weallareglobalnomads.com
==============================================================================

Open your curtains, throw back your blinds. Join the tribe.

The Global Nomads are getting ready for their US premiere in Austin,
Texas, USA (April 19). Log on to join the tribe and become a permanent
addition to the artwork.

"We All Are Global Nomads" is a real-world installation artwork
scheduled to appear in parks, town squares, and public spaces around the
world. By submitting your photo online and telling the world what's
outside your window, you become part of this artwork as it travels from
Texas to San Francisco to Thailand to Montreal to Santiago and beyond.

Open your window, join the tribe.

-ch

===================================================
We All Are Global Nomads
The World is a Vast Desert of Cyberspace--Roam Free
http://www.weallareglobalnomads.com
===================================================

A. Cinque Hicks
http://www.cinquehicks.com
cinque@cinquehicks.com


DISCUSSION

We All Are Global Nomads--Call for Worldwide Participation


We All Are Global Nomads: A Hybrid Cyber-Installation Artwork
>>Wir sind alle Welt-Nomaden==Somos Todos Nomadas Globales==Nous sommes tous des Nomades sans frontieres<<
==================================================================

http://www.weallareglobalnomads.com
(This web site is available in: DEUTSCH, ENGLISH, FRANCAIS, ESPANOL, and
JAPANESE.)

==================================================================

Friends,

Open your curtains, throw back your blinds. What's outside your window
right now? "We All Are Global Nomads" invites you to answer this
question and join a virtual tribe of world citizens, moving from country
to country, city to city, free and without regard for national
boundaries.

"We All Are Global Nomads" is a real-world installation artwork
scheduled to appear in parks, town squares, and public spaces around the
world. By submitting your photo online and telling the world what's
outside your window, you become part of this artwork as it travels from
Texas to San Francisco to Thailand to Montreal to Santiago and beyond.
Open your window, join the tribe.

How?
Log on to http://www.weallareglobalnomads.com now and participate by
uploading your photo and message today.

Join the tribe. Open your window. Open the world.

FORWARD THIS MESSAGE WIDELY, FREELY!

-==================================================================
THE WORLD IS A VAST DESERT OF CYBERSPACE. ROAM FREE.
A. Cinque Hicks
http://www.cinquehicks.com
cinque@cinquehicks.com

DISCUSSION

Representin': Digital Artists Confront Race


Representin': Digital Artists Confront Race

If October's Race in Digital Space 2.0 conference (RDS2.0) tried to
accomplish one thing, it was to demonstrate that cyberspace may not be
as white, as American or as patriarchal as most people think it is. The
conference discussions could never ultimately settle how much cyberspace
is still in need of greater diversity versus how much an already diverse
cyberspace simply needs better PR. Most likely, it needs both, but it is
clear that the problems of race stand at a pivotal juncture in relation
to digital space: on the one hand it stands to replicate the history of
television-corporate and narrow-on the other, digital space may prove to
be something more liberating, more expansive.

Held in media-saturated Los Angeles, the conference brought together a
couple hundred artists, activists, academics and others with a stake in
how cyberspace is used. As an attempt at a theoretical foundation, Jerry
Kang, UCLA professor of law, proposed four possible strategies for
dealing with race in the brave new world of media convergence, roughly:

1. abolition (ignoring race, a cyberpolicy of "don't ask, don't tell.")
2. integration (the one-big-happy-family model, think multi-racial wine
discussion newsgroups)
3. transmutation (passing, or: if I claim to be a North African Bedouin,
who are you to say I'm not?)
4. zoning (mixing and matching different strategies in different places)

The rest of the conference was of course an exercise in demonstrating
that option 4 is already happening.

Erik Loyer's online, episodic, interactive narrative "Chroma" (kind of
like a wordy, philosophical video game) plays out the complexities of
race in a digital world as characters wrestle with the problems of
incarnating themselves as digital avatars in a variety of races. How
much of race is essence? How much is a secondary byproduct of our
physical bodies?

At the other end of the spectrum, "Tropical America" starts with a solid
grounding in race and history-in this case those of Latin America-and
explores the use of gaming as a strategy for telling "alternative"
cultural histories. "Tropical America" was conceived and designed by a
handful of East LA high school students under the guidance of Onramp
Arts and is an object lesson in using comparatively low-tech, even
nostalgic technologies as an oppositional strategy of creating
content-rich, contextualized narratives.

But if the future holds the potential of ever-increasing fluidity and
access across race, gender and class boundaries, it also holds the
threatening potential for increased repression and violence. In the wake
of terrorism in the very seats of global power, the new face of
technology is our own: on surveillance videos, in retinal scans, in
police super-databases.

If this is technological "progress," how does the artist react to this?
How does the artist make of digital art, in the words of Ithaca College
professor Patty Zimmerman, "a prosthetic of hope and a shockwave for
peace?" Is such a thing possible?

The digital artist stands in a predicament: how to be conscious of race,
nation and history in a medium that so easily slips between the cracks
of all three? Artists at the conference's Digital Salons presented a
number of possible responses: Pamela Z's haunting soundscapes look at
Japanese culture as seen from the outside by a black, American woman.
Miranda Zuniga's Vagamundo recasts the beat-'em-up video game genre as
exercise in cultural empathy. DJ Spooky's irresistible, beat-laden
turntablism complements a philosophy of historical encounters and
self-definition as always a performance of the "remix," that is to say,
pieces of ourselves can be fluidly reinterpreted, recycled and
recontextualized as needed.

RDS 2.0 consciously rejected the question of the "digital divide" as too
simple a conundrum, too unsophisticated an analysis. Instead, it asks
this question to digital artists of conscience: once we get access to
technology, how do we use it? Whom do we serve?

--Cinque Hicks