Christopher Fahey
Since the beginning
Works in Brooklyn United States of America

PORTFOLIO (1)
BIO
Christopher Fahey has been making computer games and graphics since childhood, and he continues to experiment with new ideas in computer art and design. He is the creative force behind the online laboratories http://www.graphpaper.com and http://www.askrom.com. Christopher is a founding partner of Behavior, a New York-based interaction design firm, where he serves as the Information Architecture practice lead. He has led many interactive productions as an art director, game designer, interface designer, and information architect. Christopher graduated from the Cooper Union School of Art in 1993 with a focus on interactive sculptures and installations, and has worked in the new media business ever since.
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DISCUSSION

RE: [syndicate] Re: RHIZOME_RAW: Re: MOUCHETTE - Franklin Furnace'sfirst "Future of the Present 2003" Artist


> The work is a cultural incarnation of an irresponsible idea. Much of
> mouchettes "success" is based less on the "art" itself and more on the
> feeling of sexual titillation ...

I agree with Eryk, but only on this point. Mouchette appeals to folks in
some rather creepy ways. It uses child sexuality as a tool. That much is
fairly obvious.

> ... that the work promotes.

There is a difference, however, between "using" and "promoting" child
sexuality. "Promotion" implies a deliberate agenda. I believe that the
makers of Mouchette don't posess a whole lot of deliberateness. They are
exploiting sexuality, not pressing any sort of agenda.

Furthermore, how many popular culture censorship advocates constantly
miss the distinction between portrayal and promotion? How many gay
teachers or soldiers have lost their jobs due to other peoples'
inability to make a distinction between practice and advocacy?

> The confusion between art and sexual energy is
> something that I believe should be kept in check,

Our perceptions thoroughly part company here.

> I just want to draw attention to this idea: Mouchette
> is succesful because it sexualizes children, and people
> confuse this with "art". It is a different thing altogether.

Holy moly, are you saying that the sexualization of children is
automatically "not art"? No Donatello? Balthus? Caravaggio? Schiele?
Lewis Carroll? Nabokov? Henry Darger?

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: michael moore takes on the bush family before 2004


> "Moore is making a deal with Mel Gibson's Icon
> Prods. to finance "Fahrenheit 911," a docu
> that will trace why the U.S. has become a
> target for hatred and terrorism.

This is so weird. Mel Gibson is famously right-winged, his dad is even a
holocaust denier. It is bizarre that he would fund a Michael Moore
project. Maybe he just doesn't understand the concept yet.

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Artbase: Joe Zane


> The scope of the ArtBase was expanded in March of 2002 to
> include forms of
> new media art (including software art, computer games, and
> documentation of
> new media performance and installation), which had previously
> been excluded from the archive.

Oh, okay, cool! :)

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Video Game as Political Propaganda


Eryk, do you want to play CivIII online against me and my lady? Anyone
else want to join us?

Civ2 fundamentalism was the best. Fanatic units were disproportionally
powerful and cheap to produce. I almost always eventually succumbed to
fundamentalism.

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Artbase: Joe Zane


Jon Davey wrote:
> So even if someone sets up some monitors with nice
> coulors on them in a gallery space and posts an mpeg
> of that instillation to their web space it's a solution....
> of sorts....maybe....

It's his solution, but is it his art? IMHO, a web site that contains
only pictures and videos can certainly be considered net-based art. In
the case of the Joe Zane work, however, the web pages in question appear
to present themselves explicitly as *documentation* of works of art, not
as works of art in themselves.

Plenty of art is documentation of other art, of course. But with the
works in question, it doesn't seem like that is his intention. He
doesn't seem to want us to consider these web sites to be art works in
themselves. Even the Rhizome artbase pages describe the actual
sculptures, not the sites-about-the-sculptures. If he *does* intend
these little pop-up windows and quicktime movies (which by the way crash
my browser) to be stand-alone art objects, then to me they are a bit
disappointing. The sculptures are much more interesting, but I don't see
how they could/should fit into Rhizome's domain, which I thought was
about net-based art. Even under a broad definition of net-based art,
sculptures that don't have network connections clearly do not belong.

Note that this is not in any way perjorative to Joe Zane's work!! Gary
Hill and Bill Viola don't belong in Rhizome either, but I love their
tehnology-based installations. A good deal of the technology-based
sculptural works of John Simon, the McCoys, Perry Hoberman, Keith Tyson,
Julia Scher, etc (people who work on both net.art and realworld.art)
also don't belong in Rhizome. Rhizome needs to focus on it's net.art
mission if the collection is to be meaningful, useful, and/or
historically important.

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com