Christopher Fahey
Since the beginning
Works in Brooklyn United States of America

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BIO
Christopher Fahey has been making computer games and graphics since childhood, and he continues to experiment with new ideas in computer art and design. He is the creative force behind the online laboratories http://www.graphpaper.com and http://www.askrom.com. Christopher is a founding partner of Behavior, a New York-based interaction design firm, where he serves as the Information Architecture practice lead. He has led many interactive productions as an art director, game designer, interface designer, and information architect. Christopher graduated from the Cooper Union School of Art in 1993 with a focus on interactive sculptures and installations, and has worked in the new media business ever since.
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DISCUSSION

Re: A Posteriori Art - follow-up


t.whid:
> > That's not to say that
> > it can't lead to something interesting. I doubt Beuys thought to
> > himself, "I'm being profound and meaningful, ain't it great!,"

Eryk:
> I don't know about the "ain't it great" part. But I also
> doubt that his
> interest in art was simply to entertain. I think he engaged
> in deliberate, conscious acts.

I agree with Eryk here - people have "deep" reasons for doing things
that aren't always calculated and rational. As an atheist, I do find it
hard to understand that people do things for anything but cynical,
personal, selfish, secular, and worldly reasons.

But I realize that people do have deep feelings and often express those
feelings. I'm not usually one of them. But (besides mental illness)
there's no other way to explain things like the Crusades or suicide
bombing or Ray Charles singing "Drown in my own Tears".

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Dia article in NYTimes Mag


> at the time the Dia was founded they had a
> visionary who understood that there were
> some artists doing something new that needed
> major backing and gave it to them. I wonder
> what net, web new media artists could do with
> that sort of backing.
>
> do we have ideas of 'heroic' scale that need
> that sort of backing

Do we? Hell yeah. I've got a shitload of net art projects that I can't
even begin to work on without $50,000-$1,000,000 in funding. Games,
multiuser virtual performances, generative animation, information
recontextualizations, social networking, etc, etc.

It's not uncommon for a small commercial web site to cost $100,000 to
build. Are we surprised that a lot of net art comes across as conceptual
one-liners? Is it any wonder why net art mostly looks like (IMHO) sloppy
crap? I'm not just talking about the graphics, animation, and design,
but also just about the technology: most net art only works on the
OS/browser that the artist used. None of us can afford to (or have the
skills to) make sure our shit works on multiple platforms. We could use
some moolah.

By the way, it's interesting that t.whid's used the word 'heroic' to
describe a kind of big-budget net art that is the polar opposite of the
home-brewed DiY cobbled-together stuff from the mid 90's that has been
referred to on this list in recent weeks as the 'heroic era' of net art.

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Dia article in NYTimes Mag


Alex Galloway wrote:
> of Dia's twenty net art commissions
> (http://www.diacenter.org/rooftop/webproj/index.html), nine
> of them are the first web-based projects by the artists. that's
> a yawn of a curatorial strategy. Olia & Dragan and Jim
> Buckhouse are the only names on the list that have any
> experience with the net art scene. hmmm. Lynne Cooke,
> let's do lunch. we need to talk.

That's for sure. My jaw dropped to the floor when I read this in
Mirapaul's article:
Lynne Cooke, the Dia's curator, said the center
favored artists unfamiliar with the Internet. "Artists
who work with something where they don't know
the rules beforehand are more inclined to push the
envelope than those who are already very dextrous,"
she said.

I wouldn't know where to begin punching holes in the logic behind that
statement. Maybe it's just a fancy way of saying "we don't really know
any net artists", but it felt like a big fat middle finger to all the
hard-working, mega-innovative, and mad-skilled net artists I know. I
like some of the Dia commissions, but as a whole they're not really
envelope-pushing to anyone who gets around the web much.

Also, it seems like many of these 'traditional-artists-cum-net-artists'
seem to end up having a bunch of assistants and volunteers build the
projects for them anyway. I don't have a problem with that per se (I
look forward to the day where I can hire better programmers to help
build my net art for me) but it makes Lynne Cooke's statement that much
more difficult to swallow.

I don't think I know the 'rules of painting'. Maybe I should apply for a
painting commission and hire 'dextrous' young painters to build my
'envelope-pushing' painting ideas.

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: [thingist] Rub Linda the right way and she might show you wonderland


> Also, I don't understand what you mean when you say I was
> hamfisted by my ascii nudes?

I was referring to a recent post in which you mused that perhaps your
ascii nudes didn't say exactly what you wanted them to say, that they
seemed too open to misinterpretation. I'm not going to dig up your
email, but if I was wrong about my memory of your email I'm sorry. I
merely meant to point out that sometimes artists don't do a perfect job
looking at their work from another person's eyes, particularly when the
art is supposed to have a didactic or political element.

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: [thingist] Rub Linda the right way and she might show you wonderland


> I'll admit, I have realized that a lot of my
> problem with you is actually a problem
> with me- that I don't trust other peoples
> capacities, and I worry that someone
> might mistake the spewings of your
> nature for insight, and you might send
> people "astray."

Eryk, I'd *love* to hear your take on the movie "Starship Troopers".
Have you seen it?

Also: I actually agree that Joseph's pieces are exploitative, although I
would guess unintentionally. He's just a bit hamfisted in his
expression. You've been there (ascii nudes), I've been there (most of
what I've posted recently), the people at the protests with the "Buck
Fush" signs have been there.

There's nothing wrong with calling his work exploitative. It doesn't
mean that he's secretly a murderer or that he gets off on violent
imagery any more than it means that Paul Verhoeven is a fascist.

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com