Christopher Fahey
Since the beginning
Works in Brooklyn United States of America

PORTFOLIO (1)
BIO
Christopher Fahey has been making computer games and graphics since childhood, and he continues to experiment with new ideas in computer art and design. He is the creative force behind the online laboratories http://www.graphpaper.com and http://www.askrom.com. Christopher is a founding partner of Behavior, a New York-based interaction design firm, where he serves as the Information Architecture practice lead. He has led many interactive productions as an art director, game designer, interface designer, and information architect. Christopher graduated from the Cooper Union School of Art in 1993 with a focus on interactive sculptures and installations, and has worked in the new media business ever since.
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DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Day Job?


> leaving your day jobs off your artist cv doesn't necessarily
> indicate an
> effort to hide--it just makes sense if the day jobs aren't
> relevant to you
> art practice. in my case, i include the things (like my rhizome job,
> teaching jobs, curatorial jobs and my one commercial web
> design job way
> back when) that i think are relevant and leave out the things
> (like my job
> in a group home for teenage kids, or my jobs in restaurant
> kitchens) that
> don't really relate to what i do as an artist.

Yes, this totally makes sense. I guess I was thinking less of people
with Day Jobs totally irrelevant to their art CV (like restaurant work)
and more of people for whom there is a strong correlation between their
day jobs and their art practice. (Most non-artists leave irrelevant jobs
off of their professional resumes, too. I leave my job at the aquarium
out of my information architecture resume, for example.)

One of the salient points of the Day Job show is that, particularly with
digital artists, the line between the Day Job and the Art Career becomes
blurred. By day I make flowcharts for clients like JP Morgan or Tom
Jones (!). By night I make flowcharts for conceptual art projects. The
practices are eerily similar.

I know many other digital artists whose jobs and artwork are also
incredibly similar - HTML slingers, Flash artisans, animators, game
designers, information architects, etc. Java database programmers who
make conceptual art, or graphic designers who make artwork that
incorporates or undermines corporate iconography. (In fact, I know
sculptors who are special effects fabricators, painters who are also
commercial illustrators, electronic musicians who also make radio
jingles.) It is this gray area where I feel the art community should
feel more free to openly discuss day jobs - their own and those of
others.

My reason for wanting this untabooing is twofold. First, to make it
easier for people to understand just how hard it is for artists to do
the work that they do (this is related to my own petty class jealousy:
if I have to keep a day job to afford to be an artist while many others
do not, I want people to know why).

Second, I want to create some legitimacy to the day jobs themselves, to
open the art world up to the idea that, in many cases, the Corporate Day
Job can be an asset to someone's development as an artist. We see this
blurring already with groups like Futurefarmers, where the art world
comfortably treats a company like an art collective - which are they? I
think it's cool that their portfolio includes conceptual art and beer
promotions.

I'd like to see more of this in part because I want to see corporate
culture more open to spending (that is, losing) part of their
profitability by putting a company's resources into making art. As I've
said before, there is an entire strata of great digital art ideas and
potential projects that, like filmmaking or theater, are unbuildable
except by large teams, for which a corporate structure is ideal.

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: problems on Rhizome Raw


> ohhh my god how could i have forgotten
> perfect GRENDEL good on you!!!!!!!!!!
> man that is great

More mead for all my thanes! To Heorot!

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: problems on Rhizome Raw


> You are a very imperious hateful freak though Karei-Grendel.

Max Hrothgar!

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Day Job?


Patrick Lichty wrote:
> I understand that the concept that nearly all fine and conceptual
artists
> don't make enough at their craft to make a 'living', and mitigates
'day
> jobs'.
> However, I look at this as a result of a society that undervalues
> the worth (or use value) of art and artists. Although documenting
this fact
> is a reality, I also wonder about how such a show reifies some very
> unfavorable stereotypes (you're an artist? so, what's your day job?)

Heh heh, like the old joke: "You're an actor? What restaurant do you
work at?"

Seriously, though, I think the show is a great idea and I respectfully
suggest that your concern is 100% aimed in the wrong direction. I've
always wondered why it is that artists always make a concerted effort to
*hide* the fact that they have day jobs? Have you ever seen an artist's
CV that talks about their skills or experience as a picture framer or as
a corporate HTML coder? Almost never. Most seem to sugges that the
artist is and always has been a full-time successful artist. It's as if
we're afraid to admit that we have day jobs out of fear of looking like
we are underacheiving -- or worse, having the appearance that art-making
is a hobby.

Even the "Day Job" show seemed to select artists who have
"Art-World-Approved" day jobs, the kinds of day jobs that artists can
freely admit to having without embarassing themselves: teaching,
curating, art journalism, etc. What about the artists who, by day, wait
tables or who answer phones at law firms or who sell real estate?

The way the art world practically forbids even the mention of day jobs
reminds me of the way exclusive white-shoe Sporting Clubs used to frown
upon gentlemen having jobs *at all*, or the way the olympics used to
exclude members of the working class under the seemingly-idealistic
"Amateur" ideology. You are only permitted to participate if your hands
are unsullied by the wounds of actual labor.

I think it is a good thing to 'expose' to the world (that is, to put the
subject on the table for open discussion) the sad state of affairs about
how most artists (those without inheritances, at least) have to spend
the lion's share of their waking hours "working for the man".

It reminds me of a friend of mine who wrote an article for the NY
Observer about how many East Village rock "stars" were, in fact, trust
fund kids. He profiles about six local rock stars who had bad-boy
reputations yet who quite honestly would never have to ever work again.
Many of them were quite angry about this - how dare we openly discuss
the fact that the creative industries have a class system!

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com

DISCUSSION

Re: Digital Dumbo


> Digital Dumbo is a 3-day digital arts event that highlights
> DUMBO as a nucleus of thriving digital culture. Througout the
> weekend experience digital art in its many forms. Over 40
> artists have been selected to participate in this year's event.

The web site does not list the artists... Who are they? I'd like to go,
I think.

> M3 Projects/Mastel+Mastel Gallery
> 70 Washington Street, #700, Dumbo, Brooklyn
> http://www.digitaldumbo.com

-Cf

[christopher eli fahey]
art: http://www.graphpaper.com
sci: http://www.askrom.com
biz: http://www.behaviordesign.com