Christiane Paul
Since the beginning
Works in Broooklyn, New York United States of America


Always Evolving, Historically Rooted — Rhizome Needs Your Support


Still frame from Cory Arcangel, Various Self Playing Bowling Games (2011), as featured in Cory Arcangel: Pro Tools, curated by Christiane Paul for the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Rhizome puts the future of new media art in dialogue with its past — support the conversation, donate today.

Rhizome has been online since 1996 and I have been lucky enough to witness its growth from an informal email list to the organization it is today.

What I appreciate about Rhizome is that even as it continues to evolve and reinvent itself year after year, seeking out emerging ideas, artists, and areas of practice, it remains firmly rooted in a historical context. This can be seen not only in its pioneering work in the field of digital preservation, but also in programming and writing that finds contemporary relevance in media archives and brings different generations into dialogue.

Rhizome is a vital link between the past, present, and future of art and technology.

Support them, as I do. Give today.

— Christiane Paul, curator and scholar



Discussions (67) Opportunities (5) Events (47) Jobs (2)
EVENT

Profiling - Whitney Museum, June 8 - Spet. 9


Dates:
Fri Jun 08, 2007 00:00 - Thu Jun 07, 2007

Profiling
Whitney Museum of American Art
945 Madison Ave.
New York, NY 10021

June 8 - September 9
Lobby Gallery / Lobby

Two public art installations that explore the use of automated systems for "profiling" people comprise Profiling, an exhibition that begins on June 8 and runs through September 9, 2007, at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Addressing issues surrounding surveillance, protection, privacy, and identity, the exhibition is organized by Christiane Paul, the Whitney’s adjunct curator of new media arts.

The connection between surveillance and entertainment is at the core of SVEN - Surveillance Video Entertainment Network (2006-present), by Amy Alexander, Wojciech Kosma, Vincent Rabaud, Jesse Gilbert, and Nikhil Rasiwasia. SVEN humorously subverts the use of surveillance technologies ordinarily directed at profiling "suspicious subjects." This project asks the question, “If computer vision technology can be used to detect terrorists, criminals, or other undesirables, why can’t it spot rock stars as well?” SVEN tracks visitors, detecting their characteristics, and analyzing their "rock star potential." The resulting video and audio are displayed on monitors, interrupting the standard security camera display each time a potential rock star is detected. The idea is to examine and demystify concerns about surveillance and computer systems not in terms of being watched, but in terms of how the watching is being done -- and how else it might be done if other people were at the wheel.

David Rokeby's surveillance installation Taken (2002) provides two readings of the activities in the museum: a continuously accumulating history of movements of visitors that is both a statistical plot of gallery activities and a record of each act of each visitor; and a "catalog" of visitors' head shots with classifying adjectives randomly attributed to them (i.e. 'unsuspecting', 'complicit', 'hungry'). Taken addresses the increasing use of automated systems for profiling people as part of the "war on terrorism" and was conceived as an attempt to help ask questions about appropriate uses of technology.


DISCUSSION

[Leonardo/ISAST Network] MediaArtHistories, edited by Oliver Grau


NEW from The Leonardo Book Series and MIT Press

MediaArtHistories, Edited by Oliver Grau; with contributions by Rudolf Arnh=
eim, Andreas Broeckmann, Ron Burnett, Edmond Couchot, Sean Cubitt, Dieter D=
aniels, Felice Frankel, Oliver Grau, Erkki Huhtamo, Douglas Kahn, Ryszard W=
. Kluszczynski, Machiko Kusahara, Timothy Lenoir, Lev Manovich, W. J. T. Mi=
tchell, Gunalan Nadarajan, Christiane Paul, Louise Poissant, Edward A. Shan=
ken, Barbara Maria Stafford and Peter Weibel.

Digital art has become a major contemporary art form, but it has yet to ac=
hieve acceptance from mainstream cultural institutions; it is rarely colle=
cted, and seldom included in the study of art history or other academic di=
sciplines. In MediaArtHistories, leading scholars seek to change this. They=
take a wider view of media art, placing it against the backdrop of art his=
tory. Their essays demonstrate that today's media art cannot be understood =
by technological details alone; it cannot be understood without its history=
, and it must be understood in proximity to other disciplines--film, cultu=
ral and media studies, computer science, philosophy, and sciences dealing w=
ith images.

Contributors trace the evolution of digital art, from thirteenth-century Is=
lamic mechanical devices and eighteenth-century phantasmagoria, magic lante=
rns, and other multimedia illusions, to Marcel Duchamp's inventions and 19=
60s kinetic and op art. They reexamine and redefine key media art theory te=
rms--machine, media, exhibition--and consider the blurred dividing lines be=
tween art products and consumer products and between art images and scienc=
e images. Finally, MediaArtHistories offers an approach for an interdiscip=
linary, expanded image science, which needs the "trained eye" of art histo=
ry.

Oliver Grau is Professor for Image Science and Dean of the Department for C=
ultural Studies, Danube University Krems. He is the author of Virtual Art: =
From Illusion to Immersion (MIT Press, 2003), editor of Mediale Emotionen (=
2005) and founder of the pioneering international digital art archive www.v=
irtualart.at.

EVENT

jihui Digital Salon presents


Dates:
Sat Dec 02, 2006 00:00 - Wed Nov 29, 2006

jihui Digital Salon
in cooperation with The Project Room@Chelsea Art Museum
presents BabyLove
by Shu Lea Chang

Saturday, Dec. 2, 2006 - 2:30-3:30 PM
Chelsea Art Museum
556 West 22nd Street
New York, NY 10011
Free with museum admission.

http://agent.netart-init.org
http://www.chelseaartmuseum.org

Shu Lea Cheang will discuss "BabyLove," the second installment of her "Locker Baby Project," in the context of her work. "BabyLove," currently on view at the Chelsea Art Museum, is a mobile wifi installation that consists of 6 large size teacups -- auto-mobile units modeled after teacup rides found on old-time playgrounds -- with 6 "clone babies." The clone babies, inspired by Ryu Murakami's novel Coin Locker Babies, are each adorned with a locker key, an LED display with a random locker number and wifi connection. Love songs uploaded by the public via the Web are coded as "memory and emotion" (ME) data for the clone babies and can be retrieved and jumbled by museum visitors who take a teacup ride with the baby clones. Navigating the teacup, visitors shuffle and rearrange the love songs in the baby engine through their choice of direction and the variation of speed. Mixing nostalgia for a seemingly simpler age with network technologies, "BabyLove" explores the Internet's impact on cultural practices.
http://babylove.biz

Shu Lea Cheang works in the field of net-based installation, social interface and film production. Her net art / installation works have been commissioned and permanently collected by the Walker Art Center, MN ("Bowling Alley," 1995); NTT[ICC], Tokyo ("Buy One Get One," 1997); and the Guggenheim Museum ("Brandon," 1998-1999). Since 2001, she has been engaged in the three-part Locker Baby project - "BabyPlay" (NTT[ICC], 2001), "BabyLove" (TMOA, Taiwan, 2005), "BabyWork" (to be realized). Her web-based public performances include "Garlic=Rich Air" (Creative Time, New York 2002), "Drive by Dining" (Browserday, Amsterdam 2003), "Fluid" (Detox, Norway 2004), and "Milk" (56K bastard TV, 2005). She is currently working on "MobiOpera," to be presented in January 2007 at the Sundance Film Festival, and LOVEME2030London (commissioned by Iniva, London), which is slated as opening solo show for Iniva's Rivington Place launch in 2008. (http://www.iniva.org/season/atlasII/project_12)

Links:
http://brandon.guggenheim.org
http://www.take2030.net
http://kop.kein.org
http://www.i-k-u.com
http://www.mobiopera.mobi

jihui (the meeting point), a self-regulated digital salon, invites all interested people to send ideas for discussion/performance/etc.
jihui is where your voice is heard and your vision shared.
jihui is a joint public program by NETART INITIATIVE and INTELLIGENT AGENT
http://www.netart-init.org | http://www.intelligentagent.com
THE PROJECT ROOM is a special projects and education program that brings together international artists, curators, cultural, educational and corporate organizations.
Producer / Curator: Nina Colosi


EVENT

CLOSING RECEPTION: "Translations: Misguided Machines and Cultural Loops" - Sunday, Dec. 3, 3-5PM


Dates:
Sun Dec 03, 2006 00:00 - Mon Nov 27, 2006

GALLERY TOUR AND CLOSING RECEPTION

Translations: Misguided Machines and Cultural Loops
Selected work by Digital+Media students @ Rhode Island School of Design
http://digitalmedia.risd.edu
Curated by Christiane Paul

Sunday, Dec. 3, 2006 - 3-5 PM

Emergence @ Duo Theater
62 East 4th Street
New York, NY 10003
212-598-4320
http://www.duotheater.org
http://emergenceatduo.blogspot.com/

Please join us for the closing reception of Translations -- a selection of works by Digital+Media students at the Rhode Island School of Design -- on Sunday, Dec. 3. Artists participating in the exhibition will do a gallery tour and talk about their projects.

The projects featured in the exhibition all reference a process of "translation," be it in the sense of processes mediated by machines, systems of transcription, or communication between cultures. Taking different approaches, these works explore and juxtapose the layers of translation that inform systems of representation and communication -- from cultural exchanges to machine mediation.

Projects:
Bokyung Jun, Drawing Machine
Naomi Kaly, Dualogue / Ephemeral
Cristobal Mendoza, Every Word I Saved
Hye Yeon Nam, Self-Portrait
Ebe Odonkor, Christopher Robbins, John Ewing, Ghana Think Tank
Monica Ong, My Father's Mother
Sarah Renshaw, Translations
Christopher Robbins, Misguided Machines
Gideon Webster, Time Machine


EVENT

Translations: Misguided Machines and Cultural Loops -- Opening Sat. Nov. 4, 6-8PM


Dates:
Sat Nov 04, 2006 00:00 - Sun Oct 29, 2006

Translations: Misguided Machines and Cultural Loops
Selected work Digital+Media students @ Rhode Island School of Design
http://digitalmedia.risd.edu
Curated by Christiane Paul

Emergence @ Duo Theater
62 East 4th Street
New York, NY 10003
212-598-4320
http://www.duotheater.org

November 4 - 25, 2006
Opening hours: Thurs. - Sat. 1PM - 6PM
Opening Reception: Nov. 4, 6-8PM

Translations -- a selection of works by Digital+Media students at the Rhode Island School of Design -- brings together three groups of projects that reference a process of "translation," be it in the sense of processes mediated by machines, systems of transcription, or communication between cultures.

In Gideon Webster's Time Machine, a cast graphite object with 6 legs that is attached to the arm of an axle can be moved in a circular path around a slab of white concrete by means of a handle. Each 'step' taken by the six-legged wheel creates a drawing by slowly scraping away the concrete and at the same time wearing down the legs. The machine inscribes and translates the time of human usage into its materiality. A different form of mediation unfolds in Bokyung Jun's Drawing Machine, which consists of a long rod with a glass suspended on each end, containing water and traditional Chinese sumi ink, respectively. Releasing one drop of sumi and water on the paper every one second on opposite ends, the machine draws one big circle over the course of 45 minutes, with water and ink beginning to mingle and melt with each other after 20 minutes. The performative process of drawing again emphasizes the effects of different materials. By contrast, the action of Christopher Robbins' machines does not translate into a meaningful outcome. His Misguided Machines are trying to accomplish impossible tasks, engaging in futile endeavors. While the apparatus dutifully performs its actions, succeeding in what it has been built to do, it ultimately fails in achieving its objective. The Misguided Machines are life-support systems for "animals": while one end of the machine pumps air into a scrap of fake fur, the other end saws away at a branch from which an already dead mackerel is hanging, trying to release it into a bucket full of water below it. The Misguided Machines serve as a reminder of the ways in which automated actions can become detached from their good intentions and meaningful effects.

A second group of projects explores translation through a process of transcribing different forms of data. Cristobal Mendoza's Every Word I Saved is a digital video loop featuring a self-portrait in data. The project consists of each word Mendoza wrote and saved in documents, emails, and chats since September 2005, presenting words alphabetically and in chronological order within their group. The scrolling words become a decontextualized representation of their author, a dynamic database portrait rendered in structural rather than semantic relations. A different form of abstraction emerges in Sarah Renshaw's print series of Translations, in which she translates the alphabet and short excerpts from texts into 'crack formations' that attempt to create a literal inscription of the language of time as it affects matter and memory. The cracks, however, cannot be read as any other language system and the story becomes encoded in them. Naomi Kaly's projects Ephemeral and Dualogue take a different approach to language systems by exploring new spaces for reading and writing enabled by the fusion of different technologies. Suggesting a hybrid between a traditional paper page and the page on a digital screen, Ephemeral is an interactive paper installation that consists of an abacus-like apparatus with handmade paper beads onto which letters are projected. Sliding the beads, visitors 'trap' the projected digital characters and compose their own text. In the interactive sound piece Dualogue, layers of language and identity are interwoven in a multilingual audio mosaic. Using a small bead as an interface, visitors are invited to scan and decipher the audio encoded on a conductive thread. Sliding the bead to the left or right reveals chunks of Hebrew or English text respectively, enabling multiple readings or interpretations of the story depending on the sliding direction and speed.

Cultural translations and loops are also at the core of works by Monica Ong and Hye Yeon Nam, as well as a collaborative project by John Ewing, Ebe Odonkor, and Christopher Robbins. Ong's My Father’s Mother is a multi-media installation consisting of a portrait contained in a custom mahogany box and accompanied by audio. The sonic narrative reflects on the complexities of memory in a multi-cultural family. Hye Yeon Nam's Self-Portrait depicts the experience of displacement brought about by immigration through four videos that show her performing what seem to be simple, everyday actions, such as eating, drinking and walking. In each scenario the artist is engaged in a frustrating struggle since she literally finds herself equipped with the wrong 'tools' for completing the respective task. For Ghana Think Tank, John Ewing, Ebe Odonkor, and Christopher Robbins identified a series of problems they encountered in their community (Providence, Rhode Island), described them in short design briefs and sent them to ad-hoc think tanks formed in Ghana, Cuba, and El Salvador. The think tanks were offered a day's wages to reflect on these problems and send their solutions, which a group of art students then translated into specific plans of action and enacted. The documentation was returned to the think tanks for feedback. The focus of the project is not to resolve problems but to investigate the assumptions that are made in transposing solutions generated in one cultural context to another.

Taking different approaches, the projects in the exhibition explore and juxtapose the layers of translation that inform systems of representation and communication -- from cultural exchanges to machine mediation.

Projects:
Bokyung Jun, Drawing Machine
Naomi Kaly, Dualogue / Ephemeral
Cristobal Mendoza, Every Word I Saved
Hye Yeon Nam, Self-Portrait
Ebe Odonkor, Christopher Robbins, John Ewing, Ghana Think Tank
Monica Ong, My Father's Mother
Sarah Renshaw, Translations
Christopher Robbins, Misguided Machines
Gideon Webster, Time Machine