Carlo Zanni
Since the beginning
Works in Mars Sierra Leone

PORTFOLIO (3)
BIO
Carlo Zanni was born in La Spezia (Italy) in 1975. Since the early 2000's his practice involves the use of Internet data to create time based social consciousness experiences investigating our life. He lives far from the worldliness of the art world while showing and screening his projects in venues worldwide including: Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; New Museum, New York; Tent, Rotterdam; MAXXI, Rome; P.S.1, New York; Borusan Center, Istanbul; ACAF Space, Alexandria; PERFORMA 09, NY; ICA, London; Wood Street Galleries, Pittsburgh; Science Museum, London.
He founded "People From Mars" http://www.PeopleFromMars.org to experiment new distribution models for video art and new media projects.
http://www.zanni.org
Discussions (92) Opportunities (6) Events (51) Jobs (0)
EVENT

COOKIE Portrait, 2002-2011 New Link


Dates:
Wed Apr 06, 2011 09:32 - Mon Apr 06, 2111

I'm sorry the link to the project in the previous announcement was wrong. Please find below the right info.
http://www.zanni.org/cookieportrait
COOKIE Portrait is a project from 2002, that after several years of sleep, has been restored and launched again in 2011.  Please enjoy.
Carlo Zanni
www.zanni.org
http://www.zanni.org/cookieportrait
COOKIE Portraits are numbered portraits I send visitors for free every
time they visit the project's homepage. This work is based on the same cookie technology
that is usually used by big commercial websites such as Amazon to monitor
the choices made by users on their websites and to present product suggestions.
With the help of this technology, my portraits record the workstation
environment settings of the connected user, sending him a very
slim text file containing information about his operative system, ports,
kind of
browser and a sentence with the explication of the project and a progressive
number. This work speculates on the role of the online market and the
possible distinctions between a man and a shopping cart.
How to get your cookie portrait:
The 2011 cookie has been set to expire in one week. So if you want to keep it follow these steps:
The easiest way to collect your cookie ( except than copying the online text
generated at the website when you visit the project homepage at http://www.zanni.org/cookieproject
) is to use Internet Explorer. It stores cookies as text files in a directory called
COOKIE under Windows.
Opera has a cookies4.dat file. With Firefox 3.0 and SeaMonkey 2.0 the cookie
information is stored in the files cookies.sqlite and permissions.sqlite.
In Firefox 2 or below and Mozilla Suite/SeaMonkey 1.x, cookies are stored
in the cookies.txt file and cookie site permissions are stored in the hostperm.1
file. That SQLite file cannot be read with a normal text editor as it is
a mini database (SQLite). You can use sqlite-manager (https://addons.mozilla.org/en-us/firefox/addon/sqlite-manager/)
www.zanni.org


EVENT

COOKIE Portrait by Carlo Zanni , 2002-2011 OnGoing


Dates:
Tue Apr 05, 2011 18:39 - Sun Apr 05, 2111

COOKIE Portrait is a project from 2002, that after several years of sleep, has been restored and launched again in 2011.  Please enjoy.
Carlo Zanni
www.zanni.org
http://www.zanni.org/cookieproject
COOKIE Portraits are numbered portraits I send visitors for free every
time they visit the project's homepage. This work is based on the same cookie technology
that is usually used by big commercial websites such as Amazon to monitor
the choices made by users on their websites and to present product suggestions.
With the help of this technology, my portraits record the workstation
environment settings of the connected user, sending him a very slim text file containing information about his operative system, ports, kind of
browser and a sentence with the explication of the project and a progressive
number. This work speculates on the role of the online market and the
possible distinctions between a man and a shopping cart.
How to get your cookie portrait:

The 2011 cookie has been set to expire in one week. So if you want to keep it follow these steps:
The easiest way to collect your cookie ( except than copying the online text
generated at the website when you visit the project homepage at http://www.zanni.org/cookieproject
) is to use Internet Explorer. It stores cookies as text files in a directory called
COOKIE under Windows.
Opera has a cookies4.dat file. With Firefox 3.0 and SeaMonkey 2.0 the cookie
information is stored in the files cookies.sqlite and permissions.sqlite.
In Firefox 2 or below and Mozilla Suite/SeaMonkey 1.x, cookies are stored
in the cookies.txt file and cookie site permissions are stored in the hostperm.1
file. That SQLite file cannot be read with a normal text editor as it is
a mini database (SQLite). You can use sqlite-manager ("https://addons.mozilla.org/en-us/firefox/addon/sqlite-manager/")
www.zanni.org


EVENT

The Portrait of Sofia Imber - 2003, Restored


Dates:
Wed Mar 30, 2011 12:44 - Mon Mar 30, 2099

The Portrait of Sofia Imber  - by Carlo Zanni,
2003 - 2011 - ongoing




This is an old work of mine from 2003 that has been restored.
Enjoy.
http://www.zanni.org/theportraitofsofiaimber/

"The Portrait of Sofia Imber" is a NewNewPortrait
"The Portrait of Sofia Imber" was created in 2003 and after several years of silence it starts again in 2011.
The "Portrait of Sofia Imber" - a Venezuelan philanthropist - is shaped like a classic 32 x 32 pixel desktop icon. You can drag and drop it around your screen. In truth each pixel forming the Sofia's face (eyes, mouth and face's shape) isn't a normal and static color but a dynamic pixel-image.
Each pixel is an image taken from an online Google image searching process. The portrait keeps querying Google choosing randomly among 5 pre-programmed queries. Each image is then resized as 1x1 pixel size and imported into the portrait. Each image, being resized, takes a specific color depending on the color percentages of the original photo (a photo filled by a lot of red can become a red pixel).
The portrait refreshes every 15 seconds displaying new face expressions due to the color scheme obtained resizing the found images. Some of them can end being filled by white pixels so giving the feeling of missing pixels, ruining the original portrait layout.
This gives the portrait a kind of new expressionist value. The "pixel-images" forming the Sofia's face are browseable. It means you can click on them exploring their content.
Behind this work from 2003, lies my interest around the concept of "sign" and "mark". It is part of a series of works for which I tried to develop a tool to draw lines and make patterns, using images, audio files and videos instead of classic colors.
http://www.zanni.org


EVENT

We can be heroes


Dates:
Sat Mar 26, 2011 18:19 - Sat Jun 25, 2011

Location:
Bourogne, France

Marco
Cadioli, Benjamin Nuel, Antonin Fourneau, Dekalko Djeff,  Martin Le
Chevallier, Cory  Arcangel, Team Chman, Kolkoz, Les Riches Douaniers, 
Molleindustria, Carlo Zanni, Yann  Duyvendak.
du 26 mars au 25 juin 2011

Tel un univers multiple, «We can be Heroes» se définit comme
une session englobant une exposition, des performances, des concerts
et des ateliers/conférences qui se constituent selon différents
rythmes, et qui montrent quelques exemples de réappropriation et
détournement de l'univers des jeux vidéo dans l'art contemporain.

A lʼère de la cyberculture et de lʼintelligence collective, le
jeu vidéo sʼimpose de plus en plus à côté des disciplines artistiques
historiquement établies. 
Son esthétique et sa manière de revisiter le
réel révèle une nouvelle «représentation formelle» et de plus en plus
d'artistes contemporains l'utilisent comme moyen d'expression pour en
faire des explorations 
plastiques participatives, qui sʼéloignent de la
simple finalité ludique et de divertissement. 
Dans les œuvres
choisies pour cette programmation le rôle du spectateur demeure
fondamental, grâce à une esthétique "participative", le spectateur a
désormais la place du protagoniste.

 
Margherita Balzerani, Commissaire de lʼexposition
Liens artistes
http://www.martinlechevallier.net/
http://www.coryarcangel.com/
http://www.palaisdetokyo.com/ (Team Chman)
http://www.molleindustria.it
http://dekalkostudio.free.fr/
http://www.internetlandscape.it (Marco Cadioli)
href="http://www.zanni.org/">http://www.zanni.org



EVENT

Source Code


Dates:
Fri Mar 18, 2011 18:00 - Sun Apr 10, 2011

Location:
Phoenix, Arizona
United States of America

Source Code, reintroduces Jon Haddock’s Isometric Screenshots to Phoenix after ten years of extensive exhibition nationwide. Alongside this acclaimed series, the video game art of Jason Rohrer (New Mexico), Paolo Pedercini (Pittsburgh), and Carlo Zanni (Italy, 1975) will be shown in Phoenix for the first time. In each artwork, the intimacy in gameplay and subjects developed by the artists draws on the collective experience of mass media and daily life.
In Jason Rohrer’s Passage, personal journey and navigating the obstacles of life and relationships are explored in what the artist calls a “memento mori,” (translated in Latin as, “remember you must die”). The simple game uses 8-bit graphics and side-scrolling mechanics to “present an entire life, from young adulthood through old age and death, in the span of five minutes.” Paolo Perdercini’s Every day the same dream, unfolds the daily tedium and anonymity of working class life, allowing the player to slowly discover and defy the confines of his existence. Isolation is traded for communal culture in Jon Haddock and Carlo Zanni’s work. Haddock’s Isometric Screenshots portray historic and fictional events in the style of the popular video game The Sims. Each piece, from a protestor’s confrontation of a tank in Tiananmen Square to the picnic in the Sound of Music appears to confront society’s relationship with cultural and historic moments, playing on relative importance placed on them in relation to each other and personal life. Zanni takes on obsession with the media and the onslaught of stimuli in the game Average Shoveler. In this piece, a solo snow shoveler on the streets of New York is bombarded with current news and imagery as he interacts with passersby and is overtaken by his thoughts.
The artists’ work has been exhibited at institutions such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney, and the New Museum in New York, the Pompidou in Paris, and in locations as far reaching as Korea, Brazil, Italy, and Germany. They have been written about in Artforum, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, NewsweekWired magazine, and countless online articles and blogs.