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DISCUSSION

DISCUSSION

Go Ahead, Touch Her


Thank you for the response, Marisa.

I think vocal remixes are entirely different than video, which is one reason I found this idea so disturbing. I can understand the necessity of pop music remixing - Carey herself has been a part of some good ones (remember her and ODB, rest his soul? that was killer). I think the question for me is, even if she doesn't present an authentic self, how much right do we have to mock that, remix that, etc.? Here it seems the remix does imply ridicule. I agree that her branding of the self is problematic, and I have nothing but distaste for a beauty and fashion industry - within our culture, of course - that makes her plasticity so necessary. But I stop short of thinking her lyrics imply we should do anything we want with her - image, vocally, otherwise. I think I'd be less concerned by a regular old remix project that didn't blame the original creator - "look, you asked for it, we had no choice." We seem to treat celebrities that way a lot - we think by being in the public eye, we can parody and deride them senselessly (they couldn't possibly be real people). My concern is that, even though Carey's entire set-up here is weird and problematic, I don't think we're making it any better, even through what was meant as artistic deconstruction.

DISCUSSION

Go Ahead, Touch Her


It is unfortunate that what could have been a commentary on video, privacy, and fame's effect on one's ability to control their image turned into a post using sexual violence victim-blaming language, "touch [her] body...[she's] certainly asking for it." This is additionally inappropriate when you consider that Mariah Carey has been in abusive relationships herself. Now we're going to say that by putting out a music video - even if the opening porn theme was distasteful on her part - you have to expect that people will mock you and then blame you for their offensive remixes and language? Why isn't Mr. Laric held accountable for remixes he facilitates, and why is Ms. Olsen using such atrocious innuendo in this post? When was the last time any other marginalized group was spoken about in such a way in a news posting, and did people then also look the other way or not even notice? Having people remix a song, let alone your image, can be uncomfortable enough (and no, I don't believe that's the "price" of fame, another victim-blaming "she asked for it" type of way to justify lewd behavior). Having people laud your melange as forward-thinking art is quite another. It was the most uncomfortable thing that came into my email inbox all day.

http://rhizome.org/editorial/news/?timestamp=20080630