Aparna Bakhle
Since 2002
Works in Los Angeles United States of America

Discussions (5) Opportunities (1) Events (0) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

dvision


www.dvisionmag.com

tactical media zine published on dvd. subscribe. submit. celebrate
dissent for posterity. issue one: contraband: work by
collagist/experimental filmmaker al razutis, conglomco and carbon defense
league's recode.com, the yes men's horribly stupid stunt, scott pagano's
micro editing shatters the superstar, nicole cousino's PSA for
the streets of L.A., PHO media collective on numbers and fair use,
poet todd baron's war, rhythmpharm, roger beebe's composition in red
and yellow, andres ingoglia and raphael lyons' intro to indymedia/argentina,
institute for applied autonomy shows how Little Brother gets Busted...

next issue's theme SPACE. calling for work. awaiting...

Aparna Bakhle
Editor:DVision
www.dvisionmag.com/municate

DISCUSSION

The Journal of Aesthetics & Protest


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

1/14/04

WHO: The Journal of Aesthetics & Protest
WHAT: A Three day Event including a reading, film screening, art
exhibition and raffle.
WHEN: January 29, 30, 31 at 8PM
WHERE: Machine Gallery & Artist Residency & the Echo Park Film Center
at 1200 North Alvarado Street
WHY: To celebrate Issue No. 2 of The Journal of Aesthetics & Protest

The Journal of Aesthetics & Protest invites you to celebrate the launch
of
their second issue by joining us for three nights of events including a
reading, film screening, art exhibition and raffle. Thursday, January
29th at 8PM
preview the artwork and lounge in sartorial splendor at Machine Gallery
on
1200 D N. Alvarado St. for readings by authors Elizabeth Hansen and Ben
Ehrenreich.

Visit the Machine Gallery the following Friday afternoon to see a
stunning group art exhibition created in support of the Journal. At
8PM,
join us next door at the Echo Park Film Center as guest curator Aparna
Bakhle
presents a screening of timely works drawn from DVision's first issue
BANNED
which audio-visually attacks the act of banning. Works include Al
Razutis'
collage "A Message From our Sponsors", Roger Beebe's "Composition in
Red and
Yellow", and the Institute of Applied Autonomy's "Little Brother Gets
Busted."

This three day extravaganza concludes with a ten dollar a ticket art
raffle
at Machine on Saturday at 7PM. Bidding begins promptly at 8:00. MC'd
by
Adam Goldman of Bedroom Walls accompanying himself on synthesizer.
Don't
miss this opportunity to make outrageous claims on donations of recent
artwork by Steve Anderson, Mark Allen, Marriana Botey, Todd Bouret, Zoey
Crosher, Karl Erickson, Mark Flores, Katie Grinnan, Ben Guzman, Aiko
Hachisuka, Fritz Haeg, Mark Hagen, Violet Hopkins, Charles Irvin, Marie
Jager, Kat Jurati, Heidi Kidon, Jeff Kopp, Olga Koumoundouros, Cyril
Kuhn,
Karen Lofgren, Kelly Martin, Lize Mogel, David Thorne, Melissa Thorne,
Christina Ulke, Michael Wilson, Natalie Zimmerman and many others.

For More information contact Marc at sparkle@c-level.cc
The Journal of Aesthetics and Protest
www.journalofaestheticsandprotest.org

DISCUSSION

Re: Re: Re: Thom Yorke / Howard Zinn


> But the best art speaks a wholly different language. I wouldn't call
> it an ambiguous language. "Ambiguous" is a pejorative term that
> reveals an underlying preference for the didactic. You want me to put
> into words the quality of art that I most value? I most value the
> quality of art that communicates stuff which can't be put into words.

> quality of art that communicates stuff which can't be put into words

> I most value stuff which can't be put into words

> can't be put into words

> words

> words

wo

rd

s...

Thank you. Aparna

On Tuesday, November 25, 2003, at 11:16 AM, curt cloninger wrote:

> Hi Ryan,
>
> To clarify:
>
> I mean to disrespect hamfisted didactic art. Not all conceptual art
> (whatever that means) is hamfisted and didactic. Much lately is. Not
> all political art (whatever that means) is hamfisted and didactic.
> Much lately is.
>
> In the excerpt Eryk shared, we have a political activist dismissing
> the circus as something incapable of changing the world in any
> meaningful way. If you believe that, why call yourself an artist? Go
> hand out pamphlets. Zinn seems to be not merely adding an interesting
> perspective to the artistic dialogue (as you posit); he's trying to
> shoehorn art into his non-artistic understanding of llfe and human
> communication.
>
> Most experts think that being an expert in their one field makes them
> an expert in every field. Like a brain surgeoun trying tell his auto
> mechanic how best to repair his Mercedes. Academia is prejudiced
> towards methodical, didactic communication. But the best art speaks a
> wholly different language. I wouldn't call it an ambiguous language.
> "Ambiguous" is a pejorative term that reveals an underlying preference
> for the didactic. You want me to put into words the quality of art
> that I most value? I most value the quality of art that communicates
> stuff which can't be put into words.
>
> Radiohead (despite their music's lack of any overt political stance)
> positively influences contemporary culture to a much greater degree
> than Howard Zinn, and at a much more primordial, extra-didactic level.
> Because Radiohead are artists, and that's what artists do. If the
> creative approach I'm advocating seems uncomfortably intuitive and
> irreducible, perhaps you would enjoy a career in one of the social
> sciences?
>
> the big 3 killed my baby,
> curt
>
> _
>
>
> ryan griffis wrote:
>
>> i have to say that for an argument that seems in opposition to the
>> over-simplistic practice of political/conceptual art, it seems a
>> simplistic response itself. it's also strange that "political" and
>> "conceptual" art keep getting collapsed. certianly there are examples
>> of "political art" going back to Goya through the Mexican and
>> California Muralists that i don't think is being criticized here
>> (because it involves manual craft, hence "Art"?).
>> It also seems to have something to do with a valuation of ambiguity?
>> Certianly, the roots of much political-conceptual art, dada/surrealism
>> and situationism, embraced and employed ambiguity as a political
>> tactic. the politics included pleasure.
>> but much celebrated conceptual art was as apolitical as it gets (in
>> overt terms) On Kawara, LeWit, Bochner, even a lot of Kosuth's work.
>> so i guess i'm not sure what's being critized here. is it feeling like
>> one's being "preached" at with no formal outlet to distract from the
>> "sermon?" or is it a desire for manual craft? i don't have problems
>> with these positions, i'm just trying to figure out exactly what the
>> critique is, because i think some art perceived as cut-and-dry or
>> overly "didactic" can be read with much more ambiguity and
>> sensitivity.
>> but to say that "it figures that a political scientist would expect
>> this from art" as a dismissive is, well, not very useful. it overlooks
>> other forms of knowledge that might have something useful to add to a
>> critique fo visual culture. i'm not saying that it should be given
>> priority by any means (that might be scary), but it shouldn't be
>> dismissed. unless this is all about taste, in which case, whoever has
>> the most cultural power wins ;)
>> it's also strange to insist that artists don't have to try to
>> communicate, they "just do" by being part of the environment. what?
>> take care,
>> ryan
> +
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DISCUSSION

call for content


DVISION - THE 'MAGAZINE

DISCUSSION

call for content


DVISION - THE 'MAGAZINE