Annie Abrahams
Since the beginning
bram.org@gmail.com
Works in Montpellier France

PORTFOLIO (18)
BIO
Annie Abrahams has a doctorate in biology from the university of Utrecht and a grade from the Academy of fine arts of Arnhem. In her work, using video, performance as well as the internet, she questions the possibilities and the limits of communication in general and more specifically investigates its modes under networked conditions. She is an internationally regarded pioneer of networked performance art.
She has performed and shown work extensively in France, including at the Pompidou Centre, Paris, and in many international galleries including among others Espai d’Art Contemporani de Castelló, Spain; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; the Armenian Center for Contemporary Experimental Art, Yerevan; HTTP gallery in London and NIMk in Amsterdam; festivals such as the Moscow Film Festival; the International Film Festival of Rotterdam and the Stuttgarter Filmwinter, and on online platforms such as Rhizome.org and Turbulence.
She teached at the university of Montpellier in the arts department. (2002-2005) From november 2006 to january 2009 she curated the project “InstantS” for panoplie.org. She also curated and organized the “Breaking Solitude” and Double Bind webperformances on panoplie.org in 2007, 2008 and 2009.
Besides doing her art work she lectures and teaches workshops.

Information, articles etc. http://www.bram.org/info and http://aabrahams.wordpress.com/
Discussions (120) Opportunities (2) Events (36) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

Re: isabelle dinoire


> i don't think i would have arrived at this discussion so much from
> abe's video on my own... it just doesn't push those same buttons for
> me. i have a similar reaction to it as Marisa expressed. i read it as a
> response to the immediacy of the media image (document) that is already
> read through other narratives (sci-fi, "Face Off," etc). it doesn't
> challenge the dominant narrative (as "truth") as much as show how
> problematic and discursive that narrative already is.
>

Hye

I am aware that I must seem a bit (a lot) bitchy to some of you.

I was profoundly shocked yesterday when I saw this woman, being glad
with a face I thought ugly monstruous. (but she came from no face at
all, no control at all over her mouth muscles, so indeed what a gain)
I cannot look at a media image as an image or as a narration.
I see and feel reality behind.
(but not truth)

best
annie

DISCUSSION

Re: isabelle dinoire


I just watched the video again

What I saw yesterday on the television, was more scary, more exciting
and more confusing. ( and I would like to add : also more interesting
and even more artistic )

In my opinion the remixing didn't bring around an extra that might
justify the use of the image of a person with a handicap without her
conscent.

I don't think the metaphor of remixing a face is chosen quit well.
Isabelles face was repaired. Remixing a face would have been served
better with Orlan as the subject.

bye
Annie

On 2/7/06, Marisa Olson <marisa@rhizome.org> wrote:
> I fully understand where you are coming from in saying that Linkoln might
> have "made a cartoon out of an act of courage," but this piece doesn't
> read to me as someone "just making fun"--except perhaps in the sense that
> it employs many techniques that are common to his work and which are, in
> themselves, often "fun."
>
> To put it very crudely, we are talking about an act of remixing a face.
> Given Linkoln's body of work, it's interesting to juxtapose tissue
> sampling and the sampling of media. It's not my role to overstate or
> impose such an "intention" upon this work, but I think it can definitely
> be read in that way.
>
> I honestly see nothing immoral about this video. That's obviously just one
> person's subjective response, but it's one informed by another subjective
> response to the mainstream discourse surrounding face transplants. The
> subject is scary, exciting, and confusing. I think Linkoln is part of a
> generation of artists who make remixes to make sense of things in a media
> saturated culture.
>
> And it just so happens that this all occurs in a time of intense policy
> debate about both cloning and copyright.
>
> > it's impossible to tell the truth.
> > this is not about truth or falsity
>
> I agree with you here, Annie.
>
> This video reads, to me, like an animation of the "techniques of the
> observer," as Jonathan Crary famously put it. Observation, itself, is a
> complex operation...
>
> Meanwhile, it's interesting to observe the response to this work. Dare I
> ask in what way "the images on the tele were a lot more impressive," and
> how they were any more "moral" than Linkoln's video? Is this your
> sentiment about the footage?
>
> I have to say that I personally find some of the pithy headlines and media
> treatment of this story to be more outrageous...
>
> Anyway, I think this is an important conversation with implications far
> broader than the reception of Linkoln's video.
>
> Marisa
>
>
>
>
> On 2/7/06, aabrahams <aabrahams@bram.org> wrote:
> > This is what I wrote to Abe this morning :
> >
> > > "I do appreciate your work a lot, but this time I don't understand you.
> > > For me the images on the tele were a lot more impressive.
> > > you made a cartoon out of an act of courage. (even when certainly
> > > inspired/obliged by for-fame-looking surgeons)
> > > and you didn't denounce anything
> > >
> > > you were
> > > just making fun?
> > >
> > > did I miss something?
> > >
> > > best Annie Abrahams"
> > >
> >
> >
> > it's impossible to tell the truth.
> > this is not about truth or falsity
> >
> > maybe about morals?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On 2/7/06, Marisa Olson <marisa@rhizome.org> wrote:
> > > > > http://dvblog.org/isabelle-dinoire
> > >
> > > > The music is great & the creation of a kind of 'arc of
> > > > suspense', of crafting an implied narrative out of the
> > > > source material is done with consummate skill.
> > >
> > > I agree. It was very engaging.
> > >
> > > > I can't help feeling that this piece, effective as it
> > > > is (& perhaps precisely because of this) somehow fails
> > > > in an artistically and ethically problematic way to
> > > > *tell the truth*...
> > >
> > > I find this to be an interesting point. Some questions...
> > >
> > > *Why is it artistically important to tell the truth?
> > > *Why is it ethically important to tell the truth in a work of art?
> > > *How does this piece fail to tell the truth, in your opinion?
> > > *[How] does it lie?
> > > *Is this simply a question of humane reference to human subjects or some
> > > larger point about the responsibility of art? (all art?)
> > > *Is this an expectation imposed on a work of art because of its use of
> > > "documentary" material?
> > > *Is the "reality" of the source material, itself, not true enough?
> > > *Or do you find this to be some sort of "double positive" (ie true
> footage
> > > plus true footage equals falsity..)?
> > > *Without implying that this piece tries to do so, but just jumping to the
> > > larger question, is it "artistically and ethically problematic" to draw
> > > from verite to escape from and/or parody reality?
> > >
> > > Sorry--I had to use at least one French word in this post. :)
> > >
> > > Marisa
> > >
> > >
> > > On 2/7/06, Michael Szpakowski <szpako@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > > > This is as well made as one would expect it to be.
> > > > The music is great & the creation of a kind of 'arc of
> > > > suspense', of crafting an implied narrative out of the
> > > > source material is done with consummate skill.
> > > > Why then do I feel so uncomfortable with it?
> > > > I think because it seems to impose a narrative from
> > > > particular fictional genres, horror, SF ( & here I
> > > > call as my witness the music, accomplished as it is,
> > > > and the synching of the final frames to the music, the
> > > > convulsive quality of it - & I don't think I am simply
> > > > projecting any personal squeamishness here) onto a
> > > > current event,the story of which moreover, even
> > > > allowing for the hype & distortion endemic to our
> > > > media, is clearly a complex web of tragedy,
> > > > resourcefulness, gratitude, ( oh -& a deep
> > > > strangeness, I don't deny)..
> > > > I can't help feeling that this piece, effective as it
> > > > is (& perhaps precisely because of this) somehow fails
> > > > in an artistically and ethically problematic way to
> > > > *tell the truth*...
> > > > michael
> > > >
> > > > --- abe linkoln <abe@linkoln.net> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > http://dvblog.org/isabelle-dinoire

DISCUSSION

Re: isabelle dinoire


This is what I wrote to Abe this morning :

> "I do appreciate your work a lot, but this time I don't understand you.
> For me the images on the tele were a lot more impressive.
> you made a cartoon out of an act of courage. (even when certainly
> inspired/obliged by for-fame-looking surgeons)
> and you didn't denounce anything
>
> you were
> just making fun?
>
> did I miss something?
>
> best Annie Abrahams"
>

it's impossible to tell the truth.
this is not about truth or falsity

maybe about morals?

On 2/7/06, Marisa Olson <marisa@rhizome.org> wrote:
> > > http://dvblog.org/isabelle-dinoire
>
> > The music is great & the creation of a kind of 'arc of
> > suspense', of crafting an implied narrative out of the
> > source material is done with consummate skill.
>
> I agree. It was very engaging.
>
> > I can't help feeling that this piece, effective as it
> > is (& perhaps precisely because of this) somehow fails
> > in an artistically and ethically problematic way to
> > *tell the truth*...
>
> I find this to be an interesting point. Some questions...
>
> *Why is it artistically important to tell the truth?
> *Why is it ethically important to tell the truth in a work of art?
> *How does this piece fail to tell the truth, in your opinion?
> *[How] does it lie?
> *Is this simply a question of humane reference to human subjects or some
> larger point about the responsibility of art? (all art?)
> *Is this an expectation imposed on a work of art because of its use of
> "documentary" material?
> *Is the "reality" of the source material, itself, not true enough?
> *Or do you find this to be some sort of "double positive" (ie true footage
> plus true footage equals falsity..)?
> *Without implying that this piece tries to do so, but just jumping to the
> larger question, is it "artistically and ethically problematic" to draw
> from verite to escape from and/or parody reality?
>
> Sorry--I had to use at least one French word in this post. :)
>
> Marisa
>
>
> On 2/7/06, Michael Szpakowski <szpako@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > This is as well made as one would expect it to be.
> > The music is great & the creation of a kind of 'arc of
> > suspense', of crafting an implied narrative out of the
> > source material is done with consummate skill.
> > Why then do I feel so uncomfortable with it?
> > I think because it seems to impose a narrative from
> > particular fictional genres, horror, SF ( & here I
> > call as my witness the music, accomplished as it is,
> > and the synching of the final frames to the music, the
> > convulsive quality of it - & I don't think I am simply
> > projecting any personal squeamishness here) onto a
> > current event,the story of which moreover, even
> > allowing for the hype & distortion endemic to our
> > media, is clearly a complex web of tragedy,
> > resourcefulness, gratitude, ( oh -& a deep
> > strangeness, I don't deny)..
> > I can't help feeling that this piece, effective as it
> > is (& perhaps precisely because of this) somehow fails
> > in an artistically and ethically problematic way to
> > *tell the truth*...
> > michael
> >
> > --- abe linkoln <abe@linkoln.net> wrote:
> >
> > > http://dvblog.org/isabelle-dinoire
> > >
> > > +
> > > -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > > -> subscribe/unsubscribe:
> > > http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> > > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > > +
> > > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set
> > > out in the
> > > Membership Agreement available online at
> > > http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
> > >
> >
> > +
> > -> post: list@rhizome.org
> > -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> > -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> > -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> > +
> > Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> > Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
> >
>
>
> +
> -> post: list@rhizome.org
> -> questions: info@rhizome.org
> -> subscribe/unsubscribe: http://rhizome.org/preferences/subscribe.rhiz
> -> give: http://rhizome.org/support
> +
> Subscribers to Rhizome are subject to the terms set out in the
> Membership Agreement available online at http://rhizome.org/info/29.php
>

--

Traces :

Sessions provi&testi 2005
francais http://bram.org/special/provi&testi/index.htm
english http://bram.org/special/provi&testi/indexang.htm

Puisque ma Voix
francais http://bram.org/special/puisque/index.htm
english http://bram.org/special/puisque/indexeng.htm

DISCUSSION

DISCUSSION

provi&testi


http://www.bram.org/special/provi&testi
Traces of 4 provi&testi sessions in September/October 2005, monoquini
Montpellier.

provi&testi : trespasing habitudes.

best
Annie Abrahams

ps http://www.bram.org/special/puisque