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EVENT

“Japanese Ideology of Puberty”


Dates:
Sat Apr 13, 2013 19:00 - Sat May 11, 2013

Location:
Culver City, California
United States of America

Corey Helford Gallery presents

Kazuki Takamatsu
“Japanese Ideology of Puberty”
Solo Exhibition

Opening Reception Saturday, April 13, 2013 from 7-10pm
On View April 13 – May,11, 2013

Corey Helford Gallery
8522 Washington Boulevard
Culver City, CA 90232
T: 310-287-2340
www.coreyhelfordgallery.com
Open Tuesday - Saturday, Noon to 6:00pm

On Saturday, April 13, 2013, Corey Helford Gallery presents the “Japanese Ideology of Puberty,” featuring the light and shadow paintings of Japanese artist Kazuki Takamatsu, his first solo show with the gallery.

Takamatsu’s paintings of contemporary awakenings are a catharsis of tonalities. “I use computer graphics-digital-and painting-analog-to make a work and it indicates the emotion of boys and girls metaphorically,” says Takamatsu of his painting method. Through the computer graphic technique of depth mapping, three-dimensional space is digitally visualized in a series of multiple depth plains. Takamatsu hand paints the emotions of his teenage subjects modeled on deep computer visual space. “Each graduation from surface to depth means the distance and there is no light and shadow. The color of black and white are metaphor for truth and evil, race and religion.” With acrylic black and white paints and gouaches, Takamatsu renders his girls with a method mediated on social fields of sexual identity, depth-fields mapping emotions engaging with a “systematic society.”

In the featured painting, “What is Important to Me Now?,” Takamatsu reveals a girl’s contemplation as a defense of being overwhelmed: “Weapons to protect something or to get rid of something. Information, life, politics, culture, religion, friends, nature, animal, plant or mind?” Youth becomes a field of awakenings, multiple perceptions of an adulterated world. “A pure emotion of Teenager who can’t get used to the society of adult has a mirror of inconsistency of society. I think there is a beauty in it,” he says. Takamatsu celebrates the adolescent’s vision as a purity blossoming through technology media, a venus fly-trap of tech culture and viral thinking.

“Japanese Ideology of Puberty” will exhibit twelve oil paintings painted in acrylic and gouache, focusing on the emotive depth of coming of age. Of his painting, “The Flu” depicting a virus complicating life and transmitted by people, he visualizes metamorphosis. “The information, society and people always keep changing,” says Takamatsu of his ephemeral figures’ world, a vibrant, noir mapping of the rites of youth, where growing-up is a surreal awakening, a beauty transcending technocracy.

The opening reception for “Japanese Ideology of Puberty” takes place Saturday, April 13 at Corey Helford Gallery. The reception is open to the public, and the exhibition will be on view through May 11, 2013.


EVENT

CHLOE EARLY “Rainbow Ruins”


Dates:
Sat Nov 10, 2012 19:00 - Sat Dec 08, 2012

Location:
Culver City, California
United States of America

On Saturday, November 10, Corey Helford Gallery is pleased to present “Rainbow Ruins,” a new solo exhibition of oil and watercolor paintings by artist Chloe Early.

The paintings of “Rainbow Ruins” are a chromatic meditation on the lush contrasts of nature and technology. “Lullaby Lost” reveals an urban secret garden, characters reflective in an organic environment, where bright and autumnal abstractions frame tonal perception. “I wanted to invert that feeling of technology taking over and show nature and the environment in retaliation, my new paintings and the figures in them are almost being subsumed by the plants and foliage around them.” Early describes her work as colorful classicism, a painterly lyricism infusing contemporary hues with classical persuasion. Finding a balance of optimism and decay, Early explores poetic contrast, where an urban wilderness reveals unexpected songs of transcendent extremes.

“Lullaby Lost” is as Early describes, “an abandoned journey, a dead end, a downpour and a radioactive palette.” Central to all the work is emotion, grounding mercurial worlds with human presence. “The idea was to create a kind of Lost scenario, people taken from contemporary society but placed in an ambiguous environment, surrounded by wild nature and various degenerate machines,” says Early. The painting’s thematic shifts reflect in the moods of its human figures, vibrant with transformation. “The changing pace of technology, the distance between how we live now and even 50 years ago, these old machines that I’m painting seem almost organic compared to our new shiny internet based world.” As painting with oil on aluminum symbolizes change, Early’s work explores evolutions of painterly consciousness, finding hypnotic dreams in aesthetic polarities.

“Rainbow Ruins” will feature seven oil paintings on linen and aluminum with a series of small watercolors. With a stronger theme of nature than before, the paintings are unique in composition. As previous paintings have been composed from Early’s photo montages, the paintings of “Rainbow Ruins” are sourced from singular photos, as can be seen in the new works.

The opening reception for “Rainbow Ruins” takes place Saturday, November 10, 2012 at Corey Helford Gallery. The reception is open to the public, and the exhibition will be on view through December 8, 2012.


EVENT

Sylvia Ji: "La Catrina"


Dates:
Sat Nov 03, 2012 19:00 - Sat Dec 01, 2012

Location:
Culver City, California
United States of America

CHG Circa presents

SYLVIA JI
“La Catrina”

Opening Reception Saturday, November 3, 2012 from 7-10 pm
On View November 3 to December 1, 2012

CHG Circa
8530-A Washington Boulevard
Culver City, CA 90232
www.chgcirca.com
Open Tuesday - Saturday, Noon to 6:00pm

On Saturday, November 3, 2012, CHG Circa will feature “La Catrina,” Sylvia Ji’s new paintings of sublime Catrina beauty and her fifth solo exhibition with the gallery.

Central to the paintings of “La Catrina” is the specter of La Calavera Catrina, an iconic deity of Mexico’s “Day of the Dead” celebrations, invoked by Sylvia Ji as a chromatic presence enciphered with allegory. “I wanted to revisit this female figure that haunts me, the Catrina, and put her in a less sexually provocative form to a more concerned, almost sad tranquility and reflection,” says Ji.

La Calavera Catrina, or The Elegant Skull, was originally portrayed in 1910s by the Mexican artist José Guadalupe Posada as a richly adorned skeletal figure and became an enduring icon of the “Day of the Dead” celebrations. The Catrina was adoptive of the Aztecan goddess Mictecacihuatl who in the afterlife watched over the bones of the dead and all commemorating festivals. In “La Catrina,” the Lady of the Dead oversees the artist’s changes, divined through painting, and reflective with her unearthly visage.

“The color red is still prominent in a lot of the work, but takes on new meaning as the color of blood,” says Ji. “Not only is red prominent, but other colorful jewel tones as well; also intricate use of gold, copper and silver leaf.” Red hues change from the noir to traditional, shapeshifting its figure’s lives from the past to the present. As a painterly possession, “La Catrina” reveals the contemporary as a translucent identity of the past. “Many of the eyes are closed, mouths drawn in a sort of calm resignation to fate.” “La Catrina” exorcises the contemporary, where the past remains an ongoing force, grounding the present with an unworldly vibrance.

“La Catrina” will exhibit twenty-three paintings, including a series of smaller works. “I’ve tried to incorporate many of the textiles and patterns that evoke the indigenous spirit of Mexico,” says Sylvia. The rich hues and tonalities inlaid with traditional patterns and metallic foil motifs create an exhibition of saturnine beauty, resonant with life.

The opening reception for “La Catrina” takes place Saturday, November 3 at CHG Circa. The reception is open to the public, and the exhibition will be on view through December 1, 2012.


EVENT

Lola "Haro"


Dates:
Sat Sep 08, 2012 19:00 - Sat Oct 06, 2012

Location:
Culver City, California
United States of America

CHG Circa presents

LOLA
“Haro”

Inaugural Exhibition
Opening Reception Saturday, September 8, 2012 from 7-10pm
On View September 8 – October 6, 2012

To celebrate the inaugural opening of their newest space CHG Circa, gallerists Jan Corey Helford and Bruce Helford are pleased to present “Haro,” the highly-anticipated solo exhibition by artist Lola.

“Haro” reflects Lola’s most personal work to date. Based in Southern California her entire life, Lola recently relocated to the United Kingdom. She adds, “These paintings are reminders of what it means to chase a dream. I decided one year ago to change everything I know about comfort, leave my Los Angeles home, and save all I can to move myself and my girls to a cozy setting in England.”

“Haro” combines the daydreams of what we desire with the discipline it requires to make significant life changes, as Lola experienced during the year leading up to her show. Lola says, “It takes great sacrifice and a world of introspection, which I wasn’t exactly prepared for. We get so caught up with having ‘things’ — consumption. I decided to give it all away, put myself back in my childhood home and paint.”

Having sold out her first two shows, “Haro” is Lola’s third exhibition with Corey Helford Gallery, and for CHG Circa’s inaugural exhibition, she will unveil thirteen new paintings. While her palette remains soft and ethereal, her technique moves toward a more realistic aesthetic. Lola’s enchanting narratives continue to explore themes of discovery, hope and finding one’s authentic voice, despite life’s challenges. “I think this show, like all I work toward, has a silver lining.”

The opening reception for “Haro,” takes place on Saturday, September 8 at CHG Circa, and is open to the public. The exhibition will be on view through October 6, 2012.


EVENT

Colin Christian and RISK


Dates:
Sat Jul 07, 2012 19:00 - Wed Aug 08, 2012

Location:
Los Angeles, California
United States of America

COLIN CHRISTIAN
“Hello, Pretty, Pretty”

RISK
“Old Habits Die Hard”

Opening Reception Saturday, July 7, 2012 from 7-10pm
On View July 7 – August 8, 2012

Corey Helford Gallery
8522 Washington Boulevard
Culver City, CA 90232
T: 310-287-2340
www.coreyhelfordgallery.com
Open Tuesday - Saturday, Noon to 6:00pm

Marking the convergence of pop surrealism and graffiti, Corey Helford Gallery is pleased to present a double solo exhibition by iconic artists Colin Christian and RISK on Saturday, July 7.

Entitled “Hello, Pretty Pretty,” Colin Christian’s first solo exhibition with Corey Helford Gallery pays tribute to the Black Queen of Sogo from the 1968 cult film “Barbarella.”

Internationally known for his glamorous sci-fi-esque female figures crafted from fiberglass, Christian describes his aesthetic as “optimistic futurism with a giggle.” His large-scale sculptures capture beauty in many forms from futuristic portraits of Cleopatra and Hello Kitty to ultra-mod Orbit Chairs made from fiberglass, steel and faux fur.

For “Hello, Pretty Pretty,” Christian will unveil twelve new pieces, featuring luxe textures that incorporate glitter and sequins as well as darker overtones addressing transhumanism. He adds, “I wanted to push it as far as light and dark goes, both figuratively and literally.”

A striking blend of fashion, 60s pop art and 70s interior design, “Hello, Pretty Pretty,” references a wide range of influences from Christian’s life. He notes,“‘Zoofy’ was inspired by my sister-in-law’s traffic accident. It features a gothic corseted girl in eighteen-inch heels with a metal support frame on wheels so that she could walk. Another piece, my first major black figure, ‘Superflyhoney’ is a nine and a half foot tall, 70s inspired futuristic girl. Wearing a painted on rubber cat suit with giant space flares, she is based on my love of 70s soul and disco.”

Following an outdoor installation at the London Pleasure Gardens and UK gallery show on view this summer during the 2012 Olympics, graffiti artist RISK returns to Corey Helford Gallery for “Old Habits Die Hard.” Last year Roger Gastman curated the gallery’s first graffiti show “Blurring the Lines” featuring RISK, and “Old Habits Die Hard” is his first solo exhibition at the gallery and his most comprehensive to date.

For the show, RISK returns to his graffiti roots with a series of traditional work that celebrate his iconic lettering style, self-described as “organized chaos.” He adds, “although I’ve been painting with many different mediums and aesthetics, the majority of the new pieces in this show are variations of RISK pieces.” The collection of new paintings is organized into groups, allowing RISK to have chapters in his repertoire, rather than just one story. The show is made up of traditional pieces on various surfaces and textures, the new “Beautifully Destroyed” series on plaster steel frames, and “The Symbol” and “Good Times” hand series, which recently debuted at SCOPE NY. Additionally, the exhibition showcases recent sculpture collaborations. For “Elephant in the Room,” RISK partnered with artist OG ABEL to create a large-scale elephant figure with a vibrant pink glitter glaze, and for the “Pigs” series, RISK teamed up with low-rider artists Danny D, Emmanuel Cisneros, and Vince Felix to paint custom finishes.

The opening reception for “Hello, Pretty Pretty” and “Old Habits Die Hard,” takes place Saturday, July 7 at Corey Helford Gallery. The reception is open to the public, and both exhibitions will be on view through August 8, 2012.