Zoë Salditch
zoe.salditch@rhizome.org
Works in New York, New York United States of America

BIO
Your favorite internet friend. <3
Co-founder & Director of Artist Relations @ Electric Objects.
Formerly @ Rhizome and Eyebeam Art + Technology Center.


The Download: Elna Frederick



Still from Art Gallery

This month The Download features Elna Frederick's screensaver triptych Birth, Art Gallery, Death (2012).

Birth, Art Gallery, Death is a minimalist triptych in the form of a screensaver package. With white as life and black as death, each screen saver panel marks a stage in the cycle of consciousness. Birth is the genesis of consciousness through a birth canal of white arriving out of darkness. Art Gallery, where black is conspicuously absent, is the finite enclosure of a lifetime. Its contents are the thoughts and creations arising in consciousness; representations of life. Death, represented by black slowly descending upon a white screen, is ultimately a representation of life.

The Download is accessible to all Rhizome members. Start your digital art collection by becoming a member today.

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The Download: James Howard


Rhizome is pleased to announce London-based artist James Howard is featured this month on The Download.

Still from www.luckyluckydice.com (2012)

Utilizing spam that lands in his junk email folder and pop up ads, Howard appropriates the deceitful images and text in his collages highlighting the emotional tiggers that trap users. Rhizome members can download www.luckyluckydice.com (2012), a 51MB animated GIF of 1990s internet-style advertisments; a file size too large for dial-up speeds, but now easily viewable in any internet browser once downloaded. Rhizome editor Joanne McNeil interviewed him last year about the images he collects:

Images in online scams and phishing schemes can seem as artificially generated as the text — like botnet generated folk art. But there is a human hand at work. What do you think is the human element that draws people into these schemes?

People are like machines - their brains react to temptation like a computer does. Most people are able to recognise a scam, but if someone pulls the right string, sooner or later all that subconscious stuff inside you is going to lead you down the wrong path. Scams  get people by playing on insecurities, desires, fears, greed, whatever - it's uncontrollable and causes one in a thousand people to make a snap decision and pay up.

What do you consider the visual clues of this kind of kitsch of deception? Any interesting patterns or trends you've spotted over the years of collecting examples?

Squashed grinning businessmen looking into fisheye lenses, sunsets over serene oceans, happy families, sexy nurses- it's an endless and totally recognisable global visual language. There's a gruesome image of someone hooked up to a life support machine that keeps landing in my junk-mail folder these days -it always comes from a new person, with ...

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Artist Profile: Rick Silva


Rick Silva's La Région Decentralized is featured this month on The Download.

Still from La Région Decentralized, image courtesy of the artist

Nature and land are prominent subjects in your work. Could you speak a bit about your interest in nature? Do you spend a lot of time outdoors?

Working with nature and land feels natural to me. Nature and land are part of a larger fascination I have with perception, light, and time. I do spend a lot of time outdoors, my new project/blog En plein air http://enpleinair.org is all about that actually. For the project I’m taking my laptop outside and seeing what I can create while reacting to the immediate landscape and elements.

For your piece in The Download, La Région Decentralized, you explore and remix iconography of Michael Snow's 1971 experimental film La Région Centrale in a endless, self-playing video game. What about Snow's film fascinates you?

I’m interested in Snow’s use of a rotating camera/horizon. Spinning terrains are a reoccurring theme in my recent videos. Texts about La Région Centrale suggest that the camera/horizon movement in Snow’s film creates a cosmic perspective of space at the human scale, and I agree with this reading. My video game version adds an endless random time component to this idea as well.

Is La Région Decentralized your first time working with video-games as a medium?

In 2010 I used video game engines to generate scenes and imagery for video projects. I’ve used 3D spaces like Google Earth for projects since 2005 with my Satellite Jockey performances, but this is the first time that I’m releasing a game as an application. There is something very interesting in the stretching and randomizing of time that video ...

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Final Day of Rhizome's Annual Community Campaign


Today is the final day of Rhizome's Community Campaign! We are incredibly close to reaching our $25,000 goal. If you have not made your contribution yet, we ask that you please do so now. It takes only a few moments to make a donation but it makes an impact that lasts an entire year.

Throughout our history, Rhizome has brought together a forward-thinking, international community of artists, writers, curators, technologists and new media enthusiasts. Together, we can continue to promote this emerging artistic field!

Donations are essential to the operation of our programs and artist initiatives here at Rhizome. With the support from our community, we are able to bring you more content on the blog, bigger and better programs, and new features on the website.

We have been overwhelmed with the generous support from the nearly 300 individuals who have contributed to the campaign. Please consider taking a moment to join the list of Rhizome supporters today.

 

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Artist Profile: Clement Valla


Clement Valla and John Cayley's Hapax Phaenomena is featured this month on The Download.

Certificate of Authenticity, Hapax Phaenomena (2011)

In Hapax Phaenomena and other projects such as Google Earth Sites, you refer to your art objects as artifacts or curios. Do you see yourself as an observer documenting an endangered technological curiosity?

Yes. These things will all disappear, and probably soon, in the name of progress. These artifacts are atypical ephemera, and often accidental products created by various internet algorithms.  There is very little direct human hand in these artifacts. Though the purpose in collecting them is not simply for their preservation. It's more about framing them, allowing them to be seen, and showing a kind of bizarre byproduct of these super-functioning and useful systems, such as Google. 

When did you first notice the glitch in Google Earth? What inspired you to begin capturing these surreal moments?

It was accidental. I was Google-Earthing a location in China, and I noticed that a striking number of buildings looked like they were upside down. I could tell there were two competing visual inputs here - the 3d model, and the mapping of the satellite photography, and they didn't match up.  The computer is doing exactly what it's supposed to do, but the depth cues of the aerials, the perspective, the shadows and lighting, were not aligning with depth cues of the 3d earth model. I figured that this was not a unique situation in Google Earth, and I started looking at obvious situations where the depth cues would be off—bridges, tall skyscrapers, canyons. Soon I noticed the photos being updated, and the aerial photographs would be 'flatter' (taken from less of an angle) or the shadows below bridges would be more muted. Google Earth is a constantly ...

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Discussions (17) Opportunities (6) Events (2) Jobs (6)
DISCUSSION

Rhizome Today: Conversations at the Edge (of a Square)


Good Today post. Impressed with Scott's knowledge of panel manufacturing.

I'm biased towards the 9:16 ratio or "deep portrait" as Andrew Benson likes to call it. ( ^-^)

JOB

Android, iOS and Rails Engineers


Deadline:
Sat Nov 08, 2014 12:05

Location:
New York City, New York
United States of America

We're a small team of six based in New York City. We're hiring for a handful of specific roles, but if you find this project fascinating, please don't hesitate to reach out.

Android Engineer — We're looking for someone to lead the development of the EO1 Android-based operating system, in addition to a mobile Android app. You should have a few years of experience working with Android.
You'll work closely with the team building the integrated computer for EO1, to maximize graphics performance.
Most of the work will be at the application layer, but you should have some comfort digging into the lower level stuff. We're a small team, so it will be important for you to have a keen eye for user experience as well.

Product Engineer — The person in this role will build the web and mobile web Rails applications that support the Electric Objects community and Store, where users will discover, share, buy and display artwork.
You should have spent at least a few years working on websites, and ideally spent some time building community software.
You've probably worked on side projects before. That's what this is like, except all the time.

iOS Engineer — Lead the development of the iPhone and iPad applications that help users discover, collect and display artwork on their EO1.
We're pretty sure that most people will control what appears on their EO1 with their phone, so this is a pretty important platform for us. We're looking for someone with a few years of iOS development under their belt.

Other notes:
The pay and equity are competitive
We'll help the right person relocate

Interested? Introduce yourself to hello@electricobjects.com


DISCUSSION

Nail Art: From lipstick traces to digital polish


The emoji at the end was icing on the cake.

Also, thought it would be good to add that for femme lesbians there is a nail polish code or "femme flagging," since we're on this track about queerness and nail art.

http://www.xojane.com/beauty/femme-flagging-manicure
http://stuffqueerpeopleneedtoknow.com/2012/04/30/flagging-for-femmes-and-other-people-who-need-an-alternative-to-the-back-pocket/

OPPORTUNITY

The Exquisite Contraption (February 2014)


Deadline:
Mon Dec 16, 2013 00:00

The Exquisite Contraption (February 2014)

Flux Factory invites artists, designers, engineers, hackers, and makers to collaborate on an elaborate, exquisite corpse-style Rube Goldberg machine that will span multiple rooms and floors throughout Flux Factory to accomplish a simple chore.

Inspired by Rube Goldberg’s cartoons that depict overly complex machines; chindōgu, the Japanese art of “unuseless” inventions; and the growing popularity of producing these objects and machines as an art practice; The Exquisite Contraption will result in a massive, interactive, kinetic sculpture that is activated once a week for the duration of 2014 to perform its task.

Participants will work together to collectively identify the machine’s task and individually build pieces of the chain reaction. The final contraption will be created from a wide array of materials and methods and become a long term addition to Flux Factory’s architecture. In an age of consumerism that worships the invisible and efficient, The Exquisite Contraption is an experiment not only in the spectacle of visible automation and the aestheticization of externalities, but in living daily life surrounded by a conspicuous machine.

Tell us your idea for a task or chore to be automated and a section you would like to build (max 1 page). Applications are due December 16th to exhibitions@fluxfactory.org and applicants will be notified by January 6th.

http://www.fluxfactory.org/news/open-call-2014-exhibition-season/


OPPORTUNITY

Emoji Art & Design Show at Eyebeam


Deadline:
Fri Nov 08, 2013 00:00

Location:
New York, New York
United States of America

The Emoji Art & Design Show surveys the spread of emoji through popular culture with an art exhibition and Emoji Pop-Up Market.

WHY AN EMOJI ART & DESIGN SHOW?

In today’s visually oriented culture, which increasingly communicates through images rather than text, emoji comprise a kind of “visual vernacular,” a language that conveys humor, ambiguity and personality as well as meaning.

This visual form of communication isn’t necessarily new—from cave paintings, to hieroglyphics, to religious and mythological symbols encoded in traditional painting and sculpture, we’ve been communicating through images since the dawn of mankind—but its dominance in culture today, especially among millennials, seems to indicate a greater shift in our approach to self-expression.

SUBMIT YOUR WORK

Emoji are everywhere. The little pictographic characters from Japan have become one of our favorite causal modes of communication and their influence has permeated popular culture and personal expression.

If you’re an artist or designer working with emoji, send us your work. We’re looking for a diverse array of interpretations and appropriations of the emoji that exist both on and offline. The show welcomes new and existing works from a variety of mediums ranging from net art, to painting and sculpture, video and performance.

Designers looking to sell their emoji-themed products should apply to participate in the pop-up market. Please note that all pop-up market vendors should be local to NYC or able to staff their own booth.

Learn more & submit your work now through November 8th.

Presented by:
Forced Meme Productions
Eyebeam

Official Media Partner:
Mashable



SAVED WORKS (11)