luzmariasanchez
Since the beginning
luz@luzmariasanchez.com
Works in San Antonio United States of America

BIO
luzmariasanchez

http://www.luzmariasanchez.com
http://www.diaspora2487.org
http://www.soinumapa.net
http://www.triangleproject.net

Mexican-born sound and visual artist. She has a degree in music and literature from the Universidad de Guadalajara. Ph.D. in Art, Universidad Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain (2007), where she focused on the role of sound in art since its inception in the 19th century through its evolution as an independent art practice by the second half of the 20th century. Within these studies, Sánchez places emphasis on soundart and examines in her thesis the radio plays of Samuel Beckett linking them to the radiophonic art that emerged in the mid-20th century.

Sánchez has been invited to participate in diverse art residencies, including the Círculo de Bellas Artes de Madrid (2001) and the International Artist-in-Residence at Artpace (2006). Her work has been exhibited in international shows such as The Dallas Center for Contemporary Art (Dallas), Gran Teatro de La Habana, (Havana), Centro de Cultura Contemporànea (Barcelona), X-Teresa Arte Actual (Mexico City), and MUCA/Museo de Ciencias y Artes (Mexico City).

Her sound work has been included in major sound art festivals such as Zèppellin Sound Art Festival (Spain), Bourges International Festival of Electronic Music and Sonic Art (France) and Festival Internacional de Arte Sonoro (Mexico). Additionally, Sánchez has produced commissions for Arteleku/Audiolab in San Sebastián, the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City, and recently, at the National Library La Ciudadela in Mexico City.

Discussions (3) Opportunities (1) Events (2) Jobs (0)
DISCUSSION

www.diaspora2487.org


www.diaspora2487.org

2487 speaks the names of two thousand four hundred eighty seven persons who were found dead throughout the border region of Mexico and the United States. Effectually giving voice to diaspora, Sanchez's eight-channel sound piece evolves into an audible terrain where names are generated from various positions marking the varying directions of movement across the border. Each death, that was recorded and filed, has been audibly re-recorded and re-filed by the artist as individual sound files composed to play randomly, initiating organic patterns much like migration patterns themselves. Interspersed with varying periods of silence, some names are heard in isolation while others sound like links in a chain, and many overlap.

As two thousand four hundred eighty seven names are spoken the changing pace that speaks them disrupts any sense of repetition allowing the piece to extend beyond the serial monotony of name-calling. The random pattern employed in the voicing of these persons, these deaths, offers both moments of contemplation and anxiety with periods of doubt in between. That one can't actually hear all the names, as some merge into other or are overlaid, underscores the immensity and gravity of what is being called for, not just called out--the intractability of 2487 ... and 2488, and 2489, and 2490 and ... . More than just enunciating the sounds of each identity 2487 annunciates a calculated instability, a tension that quietly resonates throughout the piece.

Jennifer Davy

This sound piece records the names of 2,487 of the estimated eight thousand people who have died while trying to cross the US/Mexico border since 1993.

Luz Maria Sanchez's sound work 2487 was originally commissioned by Artpace San Antonio as part of the International Artist-in-Residence program New Works: 06.2, curated by Yuko Hasegawa, Chief Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan. 2487 was presented as part of Sanchez's solo exhibition diaspora I / II, July 6

DISCUSSION

Threat Zone at TPS


THREAT ZONE at TPS (Triangle Project Space)

Dates: November 18 - December 17, 2005
Artists: Carlos Amorales, Frances Goodman, Gulsun Karamustafa, Emily Jacir / Anton Sinkewich, Arthur Kleinjan, Basim Magdy, Ed Young

Curated by Basim Magdy

There is no particular science that studies, investigates or categorizes what is usually perceived as a personal or public threat. When confronted by the continuous and persistent political promotion of substantive or fictional threats, to secure collective support for their agendas, this is quite a paradox. Over the last few decades, the evolution of a complex network of abusive politics, technological misuse, religious fanaticism, tailored disease, international power struggles and uncontrollable natural disasters has led to an urgent need for more exploration of what we fear, why we fear it, and how to prevent its impending dangers. The introduction of mass media and its domination of knowledge-based systems have magnified the belief in its credibility. In the past, the media has engineered fictional threats, promoted them and later managed to introduce them as historical facts. This project is an attempt at exposing the overlooked in today's selective and often dictative media coverage of what we perceive as threats.

Threat Zone presents different artistic positions that investigate the constructs that guide our perception of fear. Since the introduction of his fictional character 'Amorales' and the Mexican wrestling mask that represents it, Carlos Amorales has explored identity within the social context that tends to strictly outline our behavior. By wearing the mask himself, and lending it to several performers on different occasions, he has turned 'Amorales' into an alter ego of himself and others; an adequate outlet for the violent urges and self-destruction that lie beneath. For Threat Zone Carlos Amorales will show his video My Way, a documentation of one of his wrestling performances. The work of Frances Goodman investigates very intricate details inherent in our daily routines. Her work, The Voice of Reason, delicately but thoroughly digs in people’s fear of germs and argues that these phobias and neuroses are often a reaction to the physical structures of modern society. Goodman's Do Nots accompanying text piece, displayed in public bathrooms around the city is a guide to sanitary perfection in a public bathroom. Gulsun Karamustafa's video Witchcraft subtly but effectively reflects on supernatural powers and the role of rituals in modern society. A little girl slowly reaches up to open a Pandora's Box of stacked religious objects that represent different beliefs. Accompanied by the music of Peter Mahajdik, the video becomes a ritual of its own. Emily Jacir and Anton Sinkewich are artists and activists. Their Untitled collaborative installation, comprised of books about Palestine or by Palestinian authors pressed together in a doorway in a state of hazardous suspension, is indicative of the state of the unresolved cause. One has to pass through the door, this transitory space, with caution. The slightest uncalculated move may lead to undesired consequences. Arthur Kleinjan's video Traverse is a visual narrative of a trip through memory that uses different time frames to create tension between fact and fi!
ction. T
hrough his storytelling, while driving on an empty highway, a driver is caught in a continuous perplexing vision of himself outside the car on the highway. Kleinjan's work leaves us wondering about the conflict between immediate physicality and memory. Basim Magdy's drawing installations, displayed in an almost dark environment, create a fragmented but systematic vision that sarcastically subverts prevailing representations of power in visual culture. Killing Teddy, a short video by Ed Young, is an exercise in destruction. As the artist administers a number of beatings and various other forms of sadistic acts of random cruelty on fluffy toys, one starts to wonder about the reasons behind those actions towards such icons of many affiliations, and their position in today's global culture.

Threat Zone brings to the Triangle Project Space artists' works that long for diverse interpretations and in this exhibition the viewers are encouraged to play the active role of the questioning participant. This show is a starting point for communicating and debating the different interpretations of the notion of threat.

TPS (Triangle Project Space) is a non-profit contemporary arts venue focusing on media driven aesthetics. Working with artists and curators on the periphery of contemporary art practices, TPS aims to provide an arena that encourages creative risk

EVENT

TPS_02_STEVE HAMILTON


Dates:
Sat Oct 25, 2003 00:00 - Fri Oct 17, 2003

TPS announce THE FURTHER BACK I LOOK THE FURTHER FORWARD I CAN SEE

Video and sound installations by STEVE HAMILTON (nyc)
Curated by JENNIFER JANKAUSKAS

October 25 - December 19, 2003
Opening reception Saturday, October 25, 7-9 pm
Project Space hours: Wednesdays 7-9 pm, Saturdays 12-5 pm and by appointment

New York artist Steve Hamilton introduces three new video and sound installations that reflect upon memory and the life experiences encountered in growing older. His loosely narrative constructs -though richly conceptual- evoke personal, social, and political issues from an everyday and human perspective.

TPS is pleased to present Hamilton's first solo exhibition. As co-founder of sound art collaborative Sontext, Hamilton participated in the Geneva Biennial, Switzerland and exhibited at such New York venues as the New Museum of Art; Flat Gallery; Art in General; The Swiss Institute; the Queens Museum of Art; and 1-20 Gallery. In addition, Hamilton has screened his work at the Nantucket International Film Festival, Massachusetts and the Arizona Film Festival.

TPS
1501 S. FLORES ST.
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 78204
T. + 001. 210. 224 7587
info@triangleproject.net
www.triangleproject.net


DISCUSSION

TPS_02_STEVE HAMILTON


TPS announce THE FURTHER BACK I LOOK THE FURTHER FORWARD I CAN SEE

Video and sound installations by STEVE HAMILTON (nyc)
Curated by JENNIFER JANKAUSKAS

October 25 - December 19, 2003
Opening reception Saturday, October 25, 7-9 pm
Project Space hours: Wednesdays 7-9 pm, Saturdays 12-5 pm and by appointment

New York artist Steve Hamilton introduces three new video and sound installations that reflect upon memory and the life experiences encountered in growing older. His loosely narrative constructs -though richly conceptual- evoke personal, social, and political issues from an everyday and human perspective.

TPS is pleased to present Hamilton's first solo exhibition. As co-founder of sound art collaborative Sontext, Hamilton participated in the Geneva Biennial, Switzerland and exhibited at such New York venues as the New Museum of Art; Flat Gallery; Art in General; The Swiss Institute; the Queens Museum of Art; and 1-20 Gallery. In addition, Hamilton has screened his work at the Nantucket International Film Festival, Massachusetts and the Arizona Film Festival.

TPS
1501 S. FLORES ST.
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 78204
T. + 001. 210. 224 7587
info@triangleproject.net
www.triangleproject.net

OPPORTUNITY

TPS


Deadline:
Thu Aug 21, 2003 21:03

TPS is an experimental space for national and international artists to showcase a variety of works with a special focus on media driven aesthetics. The motivating idea behind the project space is to bring forward artists working on the periphery of contemporary art practices.

Located in The Triangle building, the TPS is an integral part of a larger concept of design and art processes within a rehabilitated historical building. TPS is an experimental space created by artists Peter Glassford and Luz Maria Sanchez.

Contact: info@triangleproject.net
T.210.224.7587