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EVENT

#404 Not Found


Dates:
Fri Aug 30, 2013 06:00 - Sun Sep 08, 2013

Location:
Chicago, Illinois
United States of America

#404 Not Found
Curated by Miguel Cortez from Antena

Opening Friday August 30, 2013 from 6pm-10pm
Show runs until September 8th

"Skin has become inadequate in interfacing with reality. Technology has become the body's new membrane of existence." - Nam June Paik

The 404 Not Found is an HTTP web error message indicating that the client was able to communicate with the server, but the server could not find what was requested. Humans created this entity called the Internet which has no physicality but it is a collective forum for our ideas, comments and cat videos. This show is about artists using technology as an art form, from video, web, animated GIFS, social networks, virtual reality, etc.

Artists:
Channel TWo (CH2)
Jeff Kolar
Jon Satrom
Rob Ray
Patrick Lichty
Sarah Weis
Christopher Smith
Jake Myers
Amelia Winger-Bearskin
Emilie Gervais

Co-Prosperity Sphere
3219-21 South Morgan Street
Chicago Illinois, 60608
http://coprosperity.org


EVENT

Time Lapse: A video art group show curated by Amelia Winger-Bearskin


Dates:
Fri Nov 21, 2008 00:00 - Wed Nov 19, 2008

image

Time Lapse:
A video art group show curated by Amelia Winger-Bearskin


Works by:
Bidzina Kanchaveli
Carlin Wing
Joseph Winchester
Leanneau White
Arthur Augustynowicz
Robert Milton
and more...


Opening Friday November 21, 2008 from 6pm-10pm
November 21 - December 20

Time Lapse is last in a series of four exhibitions: Time Travelers, Time Machine, Time Lapse, and Time Lapse: Antena, curated by Amelia Winger-Bearskin. Time Travelers, was shown at Polvo in Chicago, 2007; Time Machine in Washington DC at Meat Market Gallery this past summer; Time Lapse in Nashville, Tn at Vanderbilt University and Time Lapse: Antenna will be shown in the same Chicago space where the project began bringing us back in time to the beginning.

Time Lapse is single channel video art show; all videos are displayed through a single projector one after another in the style of film screenings and time-lapse photography. Time unfolds and is captured systematically by an optical lens and/or digital media, the subjects of the videos are often overlapping, there is not an intimate knowing but a careful study of sequence, there are also holes, lapses and mistakes, there are doubts in the work.

And while it may appear obvious to time travelers that there need only be ONE time based art show for travelers to coordinate their time machines to that exact date and place, no time traveling devices were detected at the first show and the subsequent efforts have been made to make sure there is progress in this time space continuum while leaving open the idea that once this information is recorded it will likely be changed by the time travelers, machines and lapses who frequent these events from a future and past date in "time".

Amelia Winger-Bearskin is a Video/Performance Artists who is currently teaching at Vanderbilt University, Nashville Tn in the areas of Video, Performance and Drawing. She is a featured artists for the Perpetual Art Machine [PAM] and is currently creating solo video and installation works about Andrew Jackson and his home in Nashville Tn. She is also currently working on a new series of video art curations in the near future.

ANTENA
1765 S. Laflin, St.
Chicago, IL 60608
http://www.antenapilsen.com
antenapilsen (at) gmail.com
Hours: saturdays Noon-5pm or by appointment


EVENT

Spire Reloaded: Patrick Lichty


Dates:
Fri Oct 10, 2008 00:00 - Thu Oct 02, 2008

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Spire Reloaded: Patrick Lichty


Opening Friday October 10, 2008 from 6pm-10pm

october 10 - november 8

Since Patrick wont be able to attend the physical opening at Antena, he will be online and available to chat from www.secondlife.com at this location: http://slurl.com/secondlife/I%20AM%20Columbia/142/122/97

A computer will be set up at the gallery during the opening so you can see his virtual sculpture and to chat with him.

"For a long time, I have been fascinated with "obsolete spaces", or places that have fallen into disuse or been destroyed for the same reason. This includes the Hulett Ore Loaders near Cleveland, the Adak Naval base in Alaska, and now the recently dismantled Berwyn Spire. These represent the loss of certain parts of American identity in a society that is obsessed with the "new".

For this series, I documented the piece in the last year of its existence, and also made an interpretation of it in the 3D online world, Second Life. I did this as I feel that the Spire only exists in memory and our cultural databanks now, and I felt that by having a virtual version to contrast with the actual one was a fitting tribute to this iconic piece of Americana."

Patrick Lichty (b. 1962, Akron, Ohio) was born into a family with a long involvement in and support of the arts. His mother, a exhibiting artist of numerous art and craft media, immersed him in textiles, painting, ceramics, print and other techniques during his upbringing. Simultaneously he was also exposed to technology in the form of the emerging genres of electronics, video games, and later personal computing when his parents bought him an Atari 800 computer in 1978. Instead of following the desires of many adolescents of the late 70's in wanting to program the next Pac-Man or Space Invaders, he was interested in drawing and creating music with his personal computer.

Upon graduation from high school, family convinced him that computers and electronics was a field with great potential. Lichty then followed this advice to complete two degrees in electronic engineering at the University of Akron (Ohio, US), but also followed studies in Art and Asian Studies. In addition, free time was devoted to continuing interests in design, painting and digital imaging.

In 1990, while studying postgraduate Glass and Art History at Kent State University, Lichty met theatre historian Leigh Clemons and Sociologist Jonathon Epstein. Clemons would later become Lichty's scholarly collaborator (and spouse), and Epstein became partner in the media group, Haymarket Riot. During the first half of the 1990's, Lichty and Epstein created a number of works on media and culture, including Americans Have No Identity, but they do have Wonderful Teeth, The Sociology of Jean Baudrillard, and Haymarket Riot's MACHINE.

By the mid 1990's, the World Wide Web burst upon American culture, and advances in personal media production allowed the individual to create media art available only to institutions. From this, early web artworks following his love of art and theory, such as (re)cursor and video like Haymarket Riot's WEB were created, which caught the attention of corporate activists cum art group RTMark. From the mid 90's to the early 00's, the critical work started with Haymarket Riot continued in collaboration with RTMark in creating visuals and animation for exhibitions and video, culminating in 1999's Bringing It to YOU!, which was featured in the 2000 Whitney Biennial.

Solo work continued as well, exploring the nature of narrative structure in online spaces. These include 1998's Metaphor and Terrain, a 'sculptural' essay examining interface as art object, 1999's Grasping @ Bits, another hyperessay looking at issues of art and intellectual property rights, and 2000 Smithsonian American Art Museum commission SPRAWL: The American Landscape in Transition. This last piece consisted of a hyperdocumentary consisting of over 190 minutes of interviews, various texts, and 32 panoramic vistas of areas in his home town of North Canton, Ohio that were in the midst of rapid change due to the housing boom of the late 90's.

After 2000, Lichty's artistic and scholarly practice would further expand from solo and collaborative works to include numerous curatorial projects, including (re)distributions: Mobile Device and PDA Art, columnist for ArtByte Magazine, and the assumption of the Executive Editor position at Intelligent Agent Magazine (NYC), in partnership with Whitney Museum of American Art digital arts curator, Christiane Paul. In addition, his service to the New Media community also expanded by becoming Chair of the Inter-Society of Electronic Art's (ISEA's) Cultural Diversity Committee, and Executive Curator of Microcinema International's Mobile Exposure cellphone video festival.

In 2001, the RTMark visual collaborations would catch the attention of another activist group, The Yes Men. This group's comical stunts, calling for humane treatment of global populations by organizations such as Dow Chemical, EXXON, the US Government, and the WTO, were featured internationally from ArtNews to the BBC. Lichty's slapstick animations from bizarre management schemes to fast-food waste reclamation projects were core illustrative components of the group's presentations, and featured in Bluemark's documentary, The Yes Men, which showed at the Sundance, Berlin, and Sydney film festivals.

After over a decade in the New Media art world, a desire share his experience through teaching required that Lichty seek a terminal (MFA) degree. In 2004, he entered Bowling Green State University's Digital Arts program under advisor Gregory Little. While planning to graduate in 2006, Lichty has served as Representative-at-Large for BGSU Graduate Student Senate, the BGSU Public Arts Committee, and is member of Phi Kappa Phi with a 4.0 GPA. He remains in his former duties, and is most recently featured in the exhibition, Dreaming of a More Better Future, at the Cleveland Institute of Art with Kevin and Jennifer McCoy and Vito Acconci. http://www.voyd.com/voyd/

antena
1765 S. Laflin, St.
Chicago, IL 60608
antenapilsen (at) gmail.com
http://www.antenapilsen.com
Hours: saturdays Noon-5pm or by appointment


EVENT

echelon: who is watching you?


Dates:
Fri Aug 03, 2007 00:00 - Tue Jul 17, 2007

echelon: who is watching you?

Opening Friday August 3 from 6pm-10pm
August 3 - September 1, 2007

"One cannot use spies without sagacity and knowledge, one cannot use spies without humanity and justice" - Sun Tzu

"It was terribly dangerous to let your thoughts wander when you were in any public place or within range of a telescreen. The smallest thing could give you away. A nervous tic, an unconscious look of anxiety, a habit of muttering to yourself—anything that carried with it the suggestion of abnormality, of having something to hide. In any case, to wear an improper expression on your face… was itself a punishable offense."
- George Orwell, 1984, Book 1, Chapter 5

US surveillance began centuries ago with the concept of slave passes, which allowed slave-owners to monitor and control the mobility of their "chattel." Yet the slave pass system was sometimes subverted by the rare slaves who could write, such as Frederick Douglass. These literate slaves could create their own passes and might thus gain freedom for themselves and other slaves. Trafficking in passes and "free papers" soon became a burgeoning business, one that the slave system grappled with for nearly two centuries.

From slaves, the history of surveillance next turns to the infamous Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which restricted Chinese immigration to the United States. All Chinese laborers were forced to register with the government and subject themselves to being photographed and fingerprinted. A whole apparatus of surveillance was created.

In the 1920s, government surveillance spread to political radicals, especially workers trying to organize union activity. J. Edgar Hoover headed this government surveillance unit which would later become the FBI. As the 20th century advanced, computer technology proved a powerful enhancement to the regime of surveillance. This allowed most devices and databases to be monitored and evaluated, including automobiles, Your car can be tracked by GPS, and your spending habits can be gleaned from accessing your credit card records. Internet and email are monitored in the workplace and cameras are just about everywhere.

For this show artists will explore the history of surveillance and how this affects us at this present time. They will in turn create work dealing with this theme which will include 2D work, installation, and new media.

ARTISTS PARTICIPATING:
Anni Holm
Drew Browning and Annette Barbier
Dustin Klare
Elvia Rodriguez-Ochoa
Finishing School
Gretel Garcia
Ian Simmons
Jesus Macarena-Avila
Noelle Mason
Patricht Lichty
Tom Sibley
T.W. Li
Venia Bechrakis

http://www.polvo.org/echelon.html

Polvo, www.polvo.org
1458 W. 18th St., 1R Chicago, IL 60608
773.344.1940
info@polvo.org