Hye Yeon Nam
Since 2008
Works in Atlanta, Georgia Georgia

PORTFOLIO (1)
BIO
Hye Yeon Nam is a digital media artist working on audio/video installation in Atlanta and New York City. She is a Ph.D. candidate at the Georgia Institute of Technology and holds an M.F.A. in digital media from the Rhode Island School of Design. She foregrounds the complexity of social relationships by making the familiar strange, and interpreting everyday behaviors in unexpected ways.

Hye Yeon's art has been showcased in Times Square, the art gallery Eyebeam and The Tank, the D.U.M.B.O. Art Festival in New York, SIGGRAPH (2008, 2010), CHI (2010), NIME (2010), the Lab in San Francisco, and several festivals in China, Ireland, the UK, Germany, Australia, Denmark, and Switzerland. Her work has been broadcast on the Discovery Channel (Canada), and published in Wired and Makezine, among other publications.
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EVENT

Hye Yeon Nam Presents: Touching Anomaly


Dates:
Fri Jan 20, 2012 19:00 - Fri Feb 17, 2012

Location:
Brooklyn, New York
United States of America

Hye Yeon Nam Presents: Touching Anomaly

Friday, January 20, 2011
195 Morgan Ave, Brooklyn, NY, 7-9:30pm
FREE Admission

Skeletons will wave. Guns will shoot silent discomfort. Tongues will move cars. This is the delightful and surprising work of new media artist, Hye Yeon Nam, who combines technology and engineering with her personal history as a Korean immigrant. Touching Anomaly is a collection of interactive installations and video that uses and repurposes cameras, computers, motors and more to explore social interactions and cultural norms.

In Please Smile, five robotic skeleton arms elicits and manipulates human emotions by reacting to your facial expressions. Wonderland simulates the feelings of displacement and disorientation through an alarmingly unusual walk through Times Square. Polite Art is a wall of 480 motorized miniature men that bow when people approach, representing the bewildered and curious reactions that occur when cultures meet.

In Self-Portrait, the artist brings us into a world where simple activities like eating, drinking, and sitting become agonizingly difficult. Kiss Controller gives emotional weight to video game by allowing users to control a racecar by tongue kissing (breath mints will be provided).

Hye Yeon Nam has shown her work all around the world, from Sao Paolo to Copenhagen to Istanbul. Domestically, her work has appeared at Eyebeam, the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, and in a Times Square screening curated by Isabella Rossellini.

RSVP at www.3rdward.com/rsvp


EVENT

Asian American Portraits of Encounter


Dates:
Fri Aug 12, 2011 16:00 - Sun Oct 14, 2012

This exhibition displays the diversity of contemporary Asian American identity through the groundbreaking work of seven visual artists. Roger Shimomura is a third-generation American of Japanese descent who deconstructs Asian American stereotypes through his art. Born in San Francisco, Shizu Saldamando blends references to youth subculture in Southern California with nods to her Japanese and Mexican heritage. Other artists use concepts of diaspora, migration, and transnationalism to expand the meaning of their Asian American identity.
Artists from Asia who work in the United States—like Satomi Shirai, who moved to New York City from Tokyo, or Hye Yeon Nam, who came to this country from Korea to study art, and CYJO, an artist currently based in China—regularly travel back and forth from Asia to the United States and craft unique portraits of encounter from their experiences.
Artists who now live in this country—like Zhang Chun Hong, who spent the last year in her native China but makes her home in Kansas, or Tam Tran, whose family relocated to Tennessee from Vietnam—inflect their journey in expressive ways. This group of artists demonstrates, in microcosm, the nuances inherent to the Asian American experience. Their portraits of encounter offer representations against and beyond the stereotypes that have long obscured the complexity of being Asian in America and reveal the threads of contemporary life in novel ways.
CYJO
Zang Chun Hong
Hye Yeon Nam
Shizu Saldamando
Roger Shimomura
Satomi Shirai
Tam Tran


OPPORTUNITY

Analogue is the new Digital – Open Artists' Call for ACM SIGGRAPH Online Exhibition 2011


Deadline:
Sun Apr 10, 2011 00:00

Analogue is the new Digital' which will be facilitated through the ACM SIGGRAPH Digital Arts Community Network at http://siggrapharts.ning.com, and exhibited on the main SIGGRAPH arts site at arts.siggraph.org.

Rebuilding/reflecting the digital with analogue means
Physical replicas of digital spaces and narratives
Digital construction as analogue output as inverted process
Physicality of code and networks
Materialisation of data
Re-cycle – melt/shred/rebuild
Transitions/Media-Decay
Flow and Transit
Freezing of a digital moment in time
Analogue model of a digital world
The digital captured in low-tech aesthetics and craft-based traditions
Invisibility of technology
Abstract concepts of technological space
The tactile digital
Exposing the wiring behind

Output and schedule:
Curation will be facilitated via the ACM SIGGRAPH Online Digital Arts Community (DAC) site.
Due date: April10th, 2011.
The chosen contributions will be displayed on the arts.siggraph.org website as an online exhibition.
Dates: June-August, 2011
Selected works will be published in a book with related essays, due in Autumn 2011, which will be offered for sale via the ACM SIGGRAPH DAC.
Publication: Autumn 2011.
Entry Requirements:

Entries are required to be submitted via the ACM SIGGRAPH Digital Arts Community site athttp://siggrapharts.ning.com/
You must be a member of the site to be considered. Request membership by going to the site and filling out the membership form.
Upload up to 5 images in jpg format on your personal member page, and tag them with the termAnalogue
Create a new portfolio on your page with the project’s title and add these images to that specific portfolio.
You can include additional links to video documentations, websites etc.
Instructions on how to submit the project abstract that explores your chosen project in relation to the above questions (up to 350 words) and a biography/statement of your current research (up to 200 words) will be available on the site. 

We look very much forward to your contribution! 
Andrea Zapp, Curator
Jacki Morie, ACM SIGGRAPH Digital Arts Community Chair


EVENT

Hye Yeon Nam Solo show


Dates:
Sat Jan 15, 2011 07:00 - Sat Mar 12, 2011

Location:
Buffalo, United States of America

Place: Buffalo Arts Studio, Buffalo, New York
Date: Jan 15-March 12, 2011
Hye Yeon Nam: “Singularis”
Korean-born artist Hye Yeon Nam’s works, though largely based on her individual circumstances of moving to the United States, are universal in their exploration of cultural expectations, social anxieties, body image, and the boundaries between public and private space. Wonderland is a surreal video in which Nam wanders the sidewalks of NYC’s Times Square, dazing indifferently at passersby who all seem to be walking in reverse. As if caught in a dream or having momentarily awoken from one, she glides, somewhat awkwardly yet deliberately, through the unsuspecting crowd. Even after the viewer discovers the artist’s editing trick (it is actually Nam who is walking backward with the video played in reverse), what remains truly remarkable and uncanny is her ability to navigate one of the largest tourist areas in the world without so much as brushing up against another human being; the artist’s keen awareness of her body moving through space and the fact that others are so aloof and unaffected by her bizarre movements heighten the overwhelming sense of loneliness. The utterly minimal work, while lacking any semblance of emotion, conflict, or climax, nonetheless succeeds in epitomizing the inevitable feelings of curiosity, amazement, confusion, and isolation that result from significant cultural transitions. While Nam’s own vulnerability is portrayed in Wonderland, the gaze is turned back on the viewer in Please Smile, a motion-sensitive interactive robot that makes gestures such as finger pointing in response to viewers’ facial expressions. The work enables the viewer to empathize with Nam’s struggle to adhere to Confucian ideals regarding women’s role in society, as well as her experiences with prejudice and ridicule upon arriving in America. She explains, “The space of being neither here following correct rule nor there following
incorrect rule is precisely what I try to convey”; that Nam has selected neither a Korean nor an English title for her exhibition, but the Latin Singularis (“Solitary”) instead, further suggests this displacement. Self Portrait is a series of four videos in which the artist performs mundane tasks (eating, walking, drinking, and sitting) with unusual difficulty. By willingly subjecting herself to public humiliation and exposing her limitations and frustrations in witty and poignant ways, Nam tackles her adversity head-on, discovering solace and proving that “art can be a question, an argument, a proposal, a resolution, and, ideally, a nirvana.”
- Cori Wolff, Exhibitions Curator


EVENT

Hye Yeon Nam Solo show


Dates:
Sat Jan 15, 2011 07:00 - Sat Mar 12, 2011

Location:
Buffalo, United States of America

Place: Buffalo Arts Studio, Buffalo, New York
Date: Jan 15-March 12, 2011
Hye Yeon Nam: “Singularis”
Korean-born artist Hye Yeon Nam’s works, though largely based on her individual circumstances of moving to the United States, are universal in their exploration of cultural expectations, social anxieties, body image, and the boundaries between public and private space. Wonderland is a surreal video in which Nam wanders the sidewalks of NYC’s Times Square, dazing indifferently at passersby who all seem to be walking in reverse. As if caught in a dream or having momentarily awoken from one, she glides, somewhat awkwardly yet deliberately, through the unsuspecting crowd. Even after the viewer discovers the artist’s editing trick (it is actually Nam who is walking backward with the video played in reverse), what remains truly remarkable and uncanny is her ability to navigate one of the largest tourist areas in the world without so much as brushing up against another human being; the artist’s keen awareness of her body moving through space and the fact that others are so aloof and unaffected by her bizarre movements heighten the overwhelming sense of loneliness. The utterly minimal work, while lacking any semblance of emotion, conflict, or climax, nonetheless succeeds in epitomizing the inevitable feelings of curiosity, amazement, confusion, and isolation that result from significant cultural transitions. While Nam’s own vulnerability is portrayed in Wonderland, the gaze is turned back on the viewer in Please Smile, a motion-sensitive interactive robot that makes gestures such as finger pointing in response to viewers’ facial expressions. The work enables the viewer to empathize with Nam’s struggle to adhere to Confucian ideals regarding women’s role in society, as well as her experiences with prejudice and ridicule upon arriving in America. She explains, “The space of being neither here following correct rule nor there following
incorrect rule is precisely what I try to convey”; that Nam has selected neither a Korean nor an English title for her exhibition, but the Latin Singularis (“Solitary”) instead, further suggests this displacement. Self Portrait is a series of four videos in which the artist performs mundane tasks (eating, walking, drinking, and sitting) with unusual difficulty. By willingly subjecting herself to public humiliation and exposing her limitations and frustrations in witty and poignant ways, Nam tackles her adversity head-on, discovering solace and proving that “art can be a question, an argument, a proposal, a resolution, and, ideally, a nirvana.”
- Cori Wolff, Exhibitions Curator