Degradazione per Sovrapposizione di Corpi (2008)

by 1033049

What do a broom and the last 300 years of Art History have in common? Degradazione per Sovrapposizione di Corpi (DpSdC) transforms household gestures into creative interactions. On the industrial floor of Rome's ex Slaughterhouse (il Mattatoio), during the Live Performers Meeting 2008, an interface allowed the visitors to remix the paintings of the last 300 years of Art History, by simply brooming the floor. The simple and familiar physical iteraction allowed to knock down the inhibitory barriers tipically found in audiences. Evolving from the state of mere observer, laughing visitors broomed away the dust from the passive experience of arts in museums. DpSdC offers infinite possibilities for interaction: the public was not restrained in any way by the authors. Lighters, lights, aluminum foil, balls, hands and rolling bodies have been autonomously used by the visitors, delighted by the possibility to be creative and physically present in the artistic space. ...

Full Description

What do a broom and the last 300 years of Art History have in common? Degradazione per Sovrapposizione di Corpi (DpSdC) transforms household gestures into creative interactions. On the industrial floor of Rome's ex Slaughterhouse (il Mattatoio), during the Live Performers Meeting 2008, an interface allowed the visitors to remix the paintings of the last 300 years of Art History, by simply brooming the floor. The simple and familiar physical iteraction allowed to knock down the inhibitory barriers tipically found in audiences. Evolving from the state of mere observer, laughing visitors broomed away the dust from the passive experience of arts in museums. DpSdC offers infinite possibilities for interaction: the public was not restrained in any way by the authors. Lighters, lights, aluminum foil, balls, hands and rolling bodies have been autonomously used by the visitors, delighted by the possibility to be creative and physically present in the artistic space. The household iconology represented by the broom and by simple common objects - such as light bulbs and lighters - made the mechanisms of the interface immediately understandable. A simple gesture, such as the one of brooming the floor, instantly became an exstraordinary one, full of charm and visionary appeal. Under the strokes of the broom, the masterpieces of the last centuries of painting and fine arts lived a new life, abandoning the distant perceptive sphere of the museums and elevating the visitor to the level of creative author of the remixed works, through interaction and by establishing emotional bonds to the interface. DpSdC deeply criticises the concepts of "copyright" and of "Classical Arts". Aknowledging the contemporary evolutions of visual commodities and merchandises, of immaterial production, and on the deep evolution of the concept of Art (starting from Burrough's cut-up, passing through the mutations caused by Conceptual Art, and taking into account the sismic impacts inflicted by the avantguardes of the '900s to the "classical" concepts of art) DpSdC proposes a creative, distributed process, endowed with aura, but reproducible. In the contemporary era, from Warhol to street art, from architecture to remix-culture, from conceptual art to software art, from readymade to generative, re-use, re-cycling, adaption, de-contextualization and destructuralization have become fundamental tools for the creative process. DpSdC establishes a form of art, aesthetics, and content that are alive because they are processable, distributable. In DpSdC content and aesthetics can be the object/subject of debate, of clash/encounter: information, aesthetics and "the object" exist as distributable and accessible. Art really becomes universal because it is universally usable, accessible, operable.

Work metadata

Want to see more?
Take full advantage of the ArtBase by Becoming a Member
Comments

This artwork has no comments. You should add one!
Leave a Comment