AUDC Wiki (2004)

by AUDC

Invented by Ward Cunningham in 1995, a WikiWikiWeb, or Wiki, for short, is a communal, hypertext repository of knowledge on the web. Cunningham's project, the Portland Pattern Repository, gathered information on design patterns, recurring solutions to problems in object-oriented design programming. Design patterns are inspired by Christopher Alexander's idea of a pattern language that could be developed for designing buildings and cities.

"Wiki wiki" means fast in Hawaiian. Employing a simplified subset of HTML and markup within the web browser itself, a wiki page is much faster to develop than most web pages. Moreover, Wikis are editable by multiple individuals and generally actively encourage anyone who visits them to contribute.

Wikis inherently tend toward non-linear navigational structures, although hierarchical navigation pages can be created (example: The Ether Project) as well.

In 1948, Pierre Schaeffer, a broadcast engineer for Radiodiffusion-Television Francaise took the noises of trains and banging saucepans and, after ...

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Invented by Ward Cunningham in 1995, a WikiWikiWeb, or Wiki, for short, is a communal, hypertext repository of knowledge on the web. Cunningham's project, the Portland Pattern Repository, gathered information on design patterns, recurring solutions to problems in object-oriented design programming. Design patterns are inspired by Christopher Alexander's idea of a pattern language that could be developed for designing buildings and cities.

"Wiki wiki" means fast in Hawaiian. Employing a simplified subset of HTML and markup within the web browser itself, a wiki page is much faster to develop than most web pages. Moreover, Wikis are editable by multiple individuals and generally actively encourage anyone who visits them to contribute.

Wikis inherently tend toward non-linear navigational structures, although hierarchical navigation pages can be created (example: The Ether Project) as well.

In 1948, Pierre Schaeffer, a broadcast engineer for Radiodiffusion-Television Francaise took the noises of trains and banging saucepans and, after hours of editing the tapes with a razor blade, constructed two pieces of music: Etude aux Chemins de Fer and Etudes aux Cassaroles. After these sound collages were broadcast on the radio, Schaeffer would term them "musique concrete."

This is our goal for the AUDC Wiki.

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