Screen. Image. Text.

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Tauba Auerbach, RGB Colorspace Atlas. (2011)

I once heard Leon Botstein, the President of Bard College, compare books to stairs. “They’ve invented the elevator,” he said, “but sometimes you still walk up.” There are countless discussions on the future of the book—they are picked up in magazine feature articles, in trade conferences, and in academic roundtables—and in all of these, the future of the printed word seems certain: in a generation or two, print will become obsolete. In this age of changing habits, if print is the stairs and screens the elevator, then what could the escalator be?

This moment in time, and the awareness of the possibilities electronic publishing grant, affect the manner in which we relate to texts in a way that is under constant scrutiny. But images prove to be a different problem. The separation between text and images has a long history. In fact, images have posed a challenge for publishers from the early days of print—be it the cost of printing them; the payments for illustrators, photographers, and designers; or simply contextualizing the images and their relation to the text—but they have become crucial to our understanding of texts. When the Illustrated London News, the world’s first illustrated weekly newspaper, began publishing in 1842, the relationship between the text and the engraved images in the paper was such a novelty that it took the weekly about a decade to stake a hold in that era’s news distribution channels. Once it did, it became one of the most widely circulated newspapers in Victorian Britain. The marriage of text and the engraved image marked a new level of fluency in communication via images, which does away with staples of early print day, even though the separation between image and text lasted for many decades later, and can still be traced today. (Think, for example, of the plate pages, where color images were glued onto the paper, so that the book or magazine would be printed in black and white, adding the color pages later in a way that saves money on printing, but also generates a wholly different relationship with images. These are often associated with encyclopedias, but a large number of artist’s monographs retained this design even after color printing became widely accessible, creating the odd text-image relationship where an artwork is described to the most minute detail, with a comment in parenthesis directing the reader to “color plate 3,” where the mentioned piece could be seen in glossy print.)

The generations to come of age in the days of digital publishing and reading on screens have a much more complicated relationship with images. The human eye-brain system is capable of reading a large number of high quality images in a matter of split seconds, and this, alongside the hand-eye coordination—think about the pleasure of a touch screen versus inky newspaper pages—is rapidly developing to mirror our changing habits of consuming information. So much so that the contemporary heightened sensitivity to the way we read images can lead to an ability to, at times, ignore the quality of the images when inserted into a text, the way our brain glides over a typo in the flow of reading. The way we read images online is only one thing these magazines deal with in the process of publishing, but it is surely an element that dictates a large portion of the reading experience of these publications.

 

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gif. jpg. png. tif. at HEREart

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"gif. jpg. png. tif. (gjpt)," an exhibition currently on display at HEREart , explores the relationship between standardized digital image formats and visual representation. Curated by Jess Ramsay and featuring work by Jason Huff, Jordan Tate and Adam Tindale, Seyhan Musaoglu, and Giselle Zatonyl, the exhibition demonstrates how fully digital imaging has permeated visual culture. The works in the exhibition approach the pixel as a key structural component of visual representation, manipulating it to expose the formal characteristics of digital media.

Jordan Tate and Adam Tindale, Lossless, 2010.

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Printer Resources for Independent Art Publishers Tumblr

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For those involved with DIY art publishing, a number of artists, journals, and galleries have pooled together their resources to create a tumblr compiling Printer Resources for Independent Art Publishers. Bookmark it!

Originally via Collectionof

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Sic: Notes from a Keylogger (2007) - Lance Wakeling

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Records kept from Lance Wakeling's computer using Sic from September 2006

As we type and edit our attention jumps from paragraph to paragraph and from program to program, leaving a trail of disconnected phrases and commands. Much of what we type is deleted before the final product is saved, but the data have not dissapeared. Sic is the record kept by a keylogger installed on my computer. Since the keylogger records every key pressed, the data contain information best kept private, but the range of information is so great and cluttered with such noise it remains impenetrable. Sic is ongoing and chronological—it is a strict, linear record of non-linear processes. From a step back, the many colored key-commands and black phrases of text illustrate an abstract and personal topography of thoughts and actions. The illusion of Sic is that everything is displayed, but the reality is that without the final products of the labor to compare, the record will always be incomplete, and will remain pieces whose sum is less than the sum of the whole.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT ON UBU

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Ice Helvetica Ice Times (2010) - Jeff Sisson

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This is art... (2010) - sumoto.iki

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Alpha+Beta (2009-) - Michael Willis

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Yahoo Search Loop (2008) - Kim Asendorf

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Enter the first keyword to start an endless search loop with Yahoo.

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Four Letter Words (2010) - Rob Seward

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Four Letter Words consists of four units, each capable of displaying all 26 letters of the alphabet with an arrangement of fluorescent lights.

The piece displays an algorithmically generated word sequence derived from a word association database developed by the University of South Florida between 1976 and 1998. The algorithms take into account word meaning, rhyme, letter sequencing, and association.

The algorithm's tendency towards scatological or "dark" subject matter is influenced by a variety of language and perception studies, especially Elliot McGinnies' 1949 study "Emotionality and Perceptual Defense."

While the piece was conceived with idea of displaying algorithmically generated lists, it was designed with flexibility and expandability in mind. The individual units can be connected ad-infinitum, and are theoretically capable of displaying any length of text. While Four Letter Words deals with a specific range of content, the technology can be easily expanded for future textual experiments.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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t+7 (2009) - Daniel Jones

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t+7 is a Twitter adaptation of the classic n+7 text procedure concocted by the Oulipo (Ouvroir de Littérature Potentielle) group. Each substantive noun in a text is systematically substituted for the noun found 7 places after it in a dictionary, creating peculiar mutations of the original prose.

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