The Visual Reader, Graffiti Art and Digital Culture in the Journal of Aesthetics & Protest Issue 6

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TEXTING AND GRAFFITTI: Understanding the Reader in Contemporary Art" by Karla Diaz


This article, from the latest issue of Journal of Aesthetics and Protest, looks at how digital culture has influenced the most recent generation of graffiti writers, who grew up fully enmeshed in the abbreviated language of text messaging and online communication. Arguing that this gives rise to a "visual reader" who balances and decodes meaning from a digital, street, and contemporary art context, this new generation contributes a sharper sensibility while also pulling in methods and strategies from older graffiti practices. Diaz discusses how younger graffiti artists make work with the intent to document and transmit images of it online, which not only extends viewership to a larger, non-localized audience, but also shapes the contours, in terms of the type of shorthand used, of their output itself.

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Not Valid (2008) - Jonathan Vingiano

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Everything All The Time Right Now (2008) - Caleb Larsen

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minimal conceptual art of the ascii realm (2001) - Wendy Mukluk

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Seascape

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Via Robert Wodzinski

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Epiphanies (2001) - Christophe Bruno

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New Project by the Institute for the Future of the Book Investigates Collaborative Close Reading

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Image: The Golden Notebook (Screengrab)

In his 1970 book S/Z , Roland Barthes attempted to interject a new form of textual interpretation which foregrounds the experience of the reader. His description of the topos of meaning in which a text passes is beautifully prophetic to the sensation of reading within the networked environment, stating, "The blanks and looseness of the analysis will be like footprints marking the escape of the text; for if the text is subject to some form, this form is not unitary, architectonic, finite: it is the fragment, the shards, the broken or obliterated network -- all the movements and inflections of a vast "dissolve," which permits both the overlapping and loss of messages." Barthes' sentiments echo through the genre of electronic literature, emergent in the 1990s, and carry on in the Institute for the Future of the Book's latest project, The Golden Notebook, which went live yesterday. This 1962 novel by Doris Lessing candidly chronicles the life of Anna Wulf, and is narrated through the vantage of several separate notebooks. Uploaded on a site similar to Google Books, the Institute invited seven notable female authors to read the book and carry on conversations in a forum adjacent to the text. While group discussion online is old news, the possibility of uploading and reading entire books online is still a recent development, and it carries with it a number of crucial debates. By adapting the model of a reading group, one that parallels the text itself, it follows precisely with the Institute's mission to investigate the "ecology of readers, authors and texts" surrounding the networked book. One other dimension to the project, which is strangely absent from the press release and the site's Q&A section, is the decision to invite a group of female ...

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Still Available (17.10.08) - Oliver Laric

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http://oliverlaric.com/stillavailable171008.htm



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Vote For Anything (1994) - Henry Lowengard

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Artist's statement- Vote For Anything is a kind of a social experiment as well as an Internet "game" that was running even before the widespread adoption of the "World Wide Web" HTTP protocol. It originally ran as part of my gopher-based "e-zine" Glum Homebody, on the gopher of ECHO, gopher.echonyc.com (which is no longer available)...As the Web expanded beyond the original confines of CERN, I adapted the underlying program to run as a cgi-bin program on my personal web page at ECHO and also at WFMU.org, where it runs today. A few years ago, I prettied up the color scheme, but it basically runs the same as it always has... It's an interesting art piece that can be hijacked by someone with an axe to grind, simply by writing in people and things they wish to hate or promote. From an early implementation, I've always filtered out HTML in the write-ins, so that no redirection or other spoofing would be possible. By allowing for negative votes, one can actively disapprove of something, which fulfills a real need for voters. No one is restricted from multiple votes for multiple items, which sounds like it should make it easy to jam the election in some way, but in fact, this has never happened. The list of candidates ends up looking a little like lists of search engine search items, but they are a little more intentional. The open ended nature of the list lets incongruous items creep in between more serious entries, if any. In fact, incongruous items tend to take over the list, making a kind of collaborative poem, if there's enough traffic.

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From Rhizome's Artbase

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created by joel (2008) - Joel Holmberg

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The Wonder Rooms (2008) - Jess Wheelock

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