ON EVERY DOLLAR BILL (2008) - David Horvitz

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On every dollar bill that come through my hands I am stamping the back with: A small distraction interrupting you from your everyday routine.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S WEBSITE

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g (2008) - Jack Strange

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A lead ball rests on the "g" key of a laptop, producing the letter "g" within the body of a Word document. Eventually, the document becomes so large that it crashes the computer.

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Psychic (2004) - Antoine Schmitt

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Psychic sees the spectators and describes what she sees using phrases projected on the wall. And she sees maybe a little more/differently than what we see : she perceives the internal states and motivations of the spectators. The text is printed letter by letter like by a typewriter which we can also hear. (Installation design inspired by a work by Pierre Bismuth)

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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Ancient Computing (2001) - Paper Rad

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http://you-talking-to-me.com/ (2009) - JODI

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Click Through This

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Image: Becket Bowes, Alan Turing, 2009

Hypertext fiction was proclaimed at its inception as the literary genre of the future, but now it already feels like a relic of the past. Ironically, nineteen years after a software company published the first hypertext story, Michael Joyce’s Afternoon, fast internet connections and popular reference sites have made habits of fragmentary, non-linear reading common enough to prepare a wide audience for tackling hypertext fiction (who clicked on the link above before finishing this sentence?), but hardly any artists and writers are making serious attempts at it. Becket Bowes is one exception. His project [sic]ipedia, conceived for and developed during SculptureCenter’s "In Practice” program, takes the form of an evocative description of an arcane curio cabinet, with backstories of the items it contains.

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Image: Becket Bowes, Social Isolate Club, 2009 (Installation View at SculptureCenter)

Bowes’ installation in the back of SculptureCenter’s basement was composed of those items—two Ships of Theseus, a Comfortable Chair, a simulation of Alan Turing’s death mask and a model of his bust spinning on a computer monitor, to name a few. [sic]ipedia began as a simple site, with a gray sphere and blank prompt in a stripped-down variation on Wikipedia’s home page. But over the course of the “In Practice” exhibition’s run at SculptureCenter, Bowes gathered his friends—members of the Social Isolate Club, or SIC—inside his installation, to talk out the histories and significance of the objects there. At each meeting, Bowes would take notes in composition books, and then convert the notes into pages on [sic]ipedia. Taken together, [sic]ipedia (the web site) and Social Isolate Club (the installation) suggested parallels between reading hypertext and viewing an installation: both give the viewer a degree of autonomy in ...

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YouTube Comment Resources (2008) - Ginger Anyhow

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Vocal Trance Lyrics (2007) - Damon Zucconi

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Google Alphabet; 11/13/08 - Max Kotelchuck

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Suggestion Slam (2007) - Joel Holmberg

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