Extreme Animals Pictureplane Remix and Video

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Pictureplane "Body Mods" remix by Extreme Animals from Jacob Ciocci.

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Fragmentr: a Collaborative Image Remixing Site

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Fragmentr is a "collaborative image remixing site" designed by Ryan Weafer. It's also a "living archive. When you generate a permalink it displays a range of images that shuffle randomly."




Via Sarah Hromack, pointing out the site has a lot of potential: "I love a big, gorgeous, authoritative slideshow. What I love even more though, are projects that expose the precarious state of the digital image."

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Fairlight: "The Rolls Royce of synthesizers"

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Fairlight CMI on "This Week" ABC TV

The Register covers the history of Fairlight synthesizers. "An Australian-made music production system based on the Motorola 6800 processor, the Fairlight was - at well over £20,000 – a stupendously pricey piece of kit." Kate Bush and Peter Gabriel were early adopters...

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Required Reading: From the VCR to YouTube: An Interview with Lucas Hilderbrand by Henry Jenkins

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What happened before YouTube?

It's a question we've addressed here many times before. Many different histories lead to our current moment of video sharing and DIY media-making -- some subcultural (the history of fandom and a range of other communities of practice which are generating new content), some economic, some technological. Lucas Hilderbrand, author of Inherent Vice: Bootleg Histories of Videotape and Copyright, holds some critical pieces of the puzzle, writing with historiographical sophistication about the emergence of video as a technology and as set of cultural practices, about the debates it sparked especially around shifts in control over production and distribution, about the communities which formed around the sharing of tapes, and about how all of this looks forward to contemporary digital practices. It is a book which raises vital questions and provides a rich historical context for our current debates.

As someone who lived through the era when the VCR was launched, the book brought back many memories of things I had almost forgotten about the dramatic adjustments which the culture made to this transformative and transgressive technology. Working through the book for an interview, I was struck by the fact that I, like many other instructors, have had very little to say about videotape in my current course on new media and culture, something I will work on the next time I teach it.

Given my enthusiasm for this book, I was delighted to be able to interview Hilderbrand and share with you his own reflections on the ways the history of video can help us to understand some contemporary media developments.

-- FROM THE INTRODUCTION TO "FROM THE VCR TO YOUTUBE: AN INTERVIEW WITH LUCAS HILDERBRAND" BY HENRY JENKINS

[READ PART ONE]

[READ PART TWO]

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Required Reading: The Immediated Now: Network Culture and the Poetics of Reality by Kazys Varnelis

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Throughout the 1990s, digital computing and network technologies were largely employed in office work, their cultural implications confined to niche realms for enthusiasts. If that decade’s new media art formed a vital artistic subculture, it was mainly isolated and self-referential, in part due to the artists’ fascination with hacking the medium, in part due to its position as the last in a long line of Greenbergian interrogations of the medium, and in part due to its marginalization by established art institutions. Artists like Vuk Cosic, Jodi, Alexei Shulgin, and Heath Bunting replayed early twentieth century avant-garde strategies while emulating the graphic and programming demos of 1980s hacker culture, before computers left the realm of user groups and became broadly useful in society.[1]

Today, in contrast, digital technology is an unmistakable presence in everyday life and is increasingly inextricable from mainstream social needs and conventions. Network culture is a broad sociocultural shift much like postmodernity, not limited to technological developments or to “new media.”[2] Precisely because maturing digital and networking technologies are inseparable from contemporary culture — even more than the spectacle of the television was from postmodernity — they must be read within a larger context. All art, today, is to one extent or another, networked art.

This investigation can’t be limited to online venues, but it also can’t be limited to “art.” Postmodernism called high and low into question (think of Warhol as the quintessential early postmodern artist, or later Barbara Kruger, Cindy Sherman, Jeff Koons, and Richard Prince) by bringing in products of the culture industry into art, but network culture levels that distinction utterly. Art under network culture dismisses the populist projection of the audience’s desires into art for the incorporation of the audience’s desires into art and the blurring of boundaries ...


Touch My Body (Green Screen Version) (2008) - Oliver Laric

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rude dude (2007) - Justin Kemp

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Danny Tanner (2010) - Derek Larson

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Part III of Closed System Media, an ongoing series of videos addressing sculptural space in video and online media with the intention of closing the work in a culturally specific feedback-loop.

Originally via DIS Magazine

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Light Is Waiting (2007) - Michael Robinson

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You're Not My Father (2007) - Paul Slocum

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This video project is composed of a sequence of recreations of a 10 second scene from the television show, Full House, overlaid with a set of sound loops from the scene's original music.

The crews who re-shot the scene were recruited through Internet message boards and Craigslist, and each of the original 10 crews were paid $150, using a commission of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc., for Networked Music Review. The project included participants from Austin, Cincinnati, Chicago, Dallas, Denton, London, and San Francisco.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S STATEMENT

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