circle up now

(0)



circle up now uses "human aerial art" to draw attention to issues of human rights, social justice and freedom. on july 12th, in 20 locations across the world, from kathmandu to tel-aviv to mexico, they organized thousands of amnesty international supporters to join together to form images of the words "freedom," "dignity" and "justice" representing the principles of the universal declaration of human rights. you can see more photos from circle up now's global day of action right here.

[all from circle up now's global day of action, july 12, 2008. top to bottom: malmoe, sweden. bamako, mali. karnataka, india.]

MORE »

Originally posted on i heart photograph by Rhizome


BRENDA RAY: WORLD VOICES PROJECT

(0)

BRENDA RAY: WORLD VOICES PROJECT
A SOUND INSTALLATION OF NEARLY 50 VOICES FROM DIFFERENT
COUNTRIES FEATURING THE READING OF EXCERPTS OF THE DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS

JULY 20-AUGUST 3, 2008, SOUTH STREET SEAPORT

New York, NY (July 1, 2008) From July 20 through August 3, 2008, nearly 50 different voices reading the United Nation's Universal Declaration of Human Rights may be heard in World Voices Project. An engaging and poetic sound installation created by artist Brenda Ray, this project is a celebration of the 60th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Human Rights. Held at The South Street Seaport, Pier 17, Third Floor Atrium, Fulton and South Streets, admission to the event is free and open to the public. Hours are: Weekdays 12-7pm, weekends 12-9pm. Opening reception: Sunday, July 20, 6-9pm. For more information, contact 212.477.0961 or log on to www.worldvoicesproject.com.

Brenda Ray began the World Voices Project two years ago, and the project continues to evolve. She has interviewed friends, colleagues and artists from different countries, covering nearly 50 nations and different languages. Among the many voice recordings are languages such as Tigrinya of Eritrea, Amharic of Ethiopia, Mongolian, Zulu and Shona of Zimbabwe.

Letting each voice speak for itself, Ray taped the readings with little treatment. At South Street Seaport, she has installed a jungle of hanging headphones, offering a pristine listening environment. Several headphones include multiple languages mixed together, transforming the recordings into a mosaic of sounds with the understanding that our common humanity transcends language barriers.

[CONTINUED]

MORE »

Originally posted on LMCC Blog by Rhizome


Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience

(0)

  <center><img src="http://transition.turbulence.org/blog/images/2008/07/0262042495-f30.jpg"></center>

Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience; Edited by Beatriz da Costa and Kavita Philip -- Popular culture in this "biological" seems to feed on proliferating fears, anxieties, and hopes around the life sciences at a time when such basic concepts as scientific truth, race and gender identity, and the human itself are destabilized in the public eye. Tactical Biopolitics suggests that the political challenges at the intersection of life, science, and art are best addressed through a combination of artistic intervention, critical theorizing, and reflective practices. Transcending disciplinary boundaries, contributions to this volume focus on the political significance of recent advances in the biological sciences and explore the possibility of public participation in scientific discourse, drawing on research and practice in art, biology, critical theory, anthropology, and cultural studies.

After framing the subject in terms of both biology and art, Tactical Biopolitics discusses such topics as race and genetics (with contributions from leading biologists Richard Lewontin and Richard Levins); feminist bioscience; the politics of scientific expertise; bioart and the public sphere (with an essay by artist Claire Pentecost); activism and public health (with an essay by Treatment Action Group co-founder Mark Harrington); biosecurity after 9/11 (with essays by artists' collective Critical Art Ensemble and anthropologist Paul Rabinow); and human-animal interaction (with a framing essay by cultural theorist Donna Haraway).

Contributors: Gaymon Bennett, Larry Carbone, Karen Cardozo, Gary Cass, Beatriz da Costa, Oron Catts, Gabriella Coleman, Critical Art Ensemble, Gwen D'Arcangelis, Troy Duster, Donna Haraway, Mark Harrington, Jens Hauser, Kathy High, Fatimah Jackson, Gwyneth Jones, Jonathan King, Richard Levins, Richard Lewontin, Rachel Mayeri, Sherie McDonald, Claire Pentecost, Kavita Philip, Paul Rabinow, Banu Subramanian, subRosa, Abha Sur, Samir Sur, Jacqueline Stevens, Eugene Thacker, Paul Vanouse, Ionat Zurr.

MORE »

Originally posted on networked_performance by Rhizome


Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience

(0)

Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience; Edited by Beatriz da Costa and Kavita Philip -- Popular culture in this "biological" seems to feed on proliferating fears, anxieties, and hopes around the life sciences at a time when such basic concepts as scientific truth, race and gender identity, and the human itself are destabilized in the public eye. Tactical Biopolitics suggests that the political challenges at the intersection of life, science, and art are best addressed through a combination of artistic intervention, critical theorizing, and reflective practices. Transcending disciplinary boundaries, contributions to this volume focus on the political significance of recent advances in the biological sciences and explore the possibility of public participation in scientific discourse, drawing on research and practice in art, biology, critical theory, anthropology, and cultural studies.

After framing the subject in terms of both biology and art, Tactical Biopolitics discusses such topics as race and genetics (with contributions from leading biologists Richard Lewontin and Richard Levins); feminist bioscience; the politics of scientific expertise; bioart and the public sphere (with an essay by artist Claire Pentecost); activism and public health (with an essay by Treatment Action Group co-founder Mark Harrington); biosecurity after 9/11 (with essays by artists' collective Critical Art Ensemble and anthropologist Paul Rabinow); and human-animal interaction (with a framing essay by cultural theorist Donna Haraway).

Contributors: Gaymon Bennett, Larry Carbone, Karen Cardozo, Gary Cass, Beatriz da Costa, Oron Catts, Gabriella Coleman, Critical Art Ensemble, Gwen D'Arcangelis, Troy Duster, Donna Haraway, Mark Harrington, Jens Hauser, Kathy High, Fatimah Jackson, Gwyneth Jones, Jonathan King, Richard Levins, Richard Lewontin, Rachel Mayeri, Sherie McDonald, Claire Pentecost, Kavita Philip, Paul Rabinow, Banu Subramanian, subRosa, Abha Sur, Samir Sur, Jacqueline Stevens, Eugene Thacker, Paul Vanouse, Ionat Zurr.

MORE »

Originally posted on networked_performance by Rhizome


Interactivos? workshop: Biophionitos

(0)

Another project developed last month during Vision Play, one of the Interactivos? workshops organized by Medialab Prado in Madrid. This time I asked Horacio González and Paola Guimerans to tell us something about biophionitos, a project they developed together with Igor Gonzáez and other collaborators.

Biophionitos generates artificial life using a system similar to the zoetrope, an early animation device that produces an illusion of action from a rapid succession of static pictures. Horacio González, Paola Guimerans and Igor González added to the concept a touch of Processing and a whiff of Arduino to develop an interface able to create a physical animation which runs in an old-style but interactive phenakistoscope (one of them reacts to your caresses, another one wakes up when you talk to it, etc).

This virtual pet created with the system is made of a limited series of simple polygons which the program has modified in order to give the drawing what looks like a biological life.

The artists also uploaded online a tutorial to do your own Biophionitos.

[CONTINUED]

MORE »

Originally posted on we make money not art by Rhizome


Call for Participation: Mediatopia Project ISEA Singapore 2008

(0)

Mediatopia
{mashup, remix, transmit}
MEDIATOPIA/ISEA SINGAPORE 2008

Call for Participation:

Submit any media files, playlists, links,node coordinates, live webcasts or URLs.
Please read criteria for Border Transmissions at ISEA 2008 Singapore for related context.
Your media can be uploaded or linked into the Mediatopia database and be included in the participatory sequence produced onsite at the National Gallery of Singapore and viewable / re mixable / mash-up-able on the net via live webcast.

For more information on this project, to submit images and to view the live broadcast visit the project site at: www.mediatopia.org.

Project Details:
The Mediatopia Project and related events will reflect upon the ISEA 2008 Border Transmissions Theme and will exploit the potential of networks, communication tools, alternate economies and experiential technologies as a collaborative engine to enable the emergence of a different conception of borders, and of the transmissions that problematize these demarcations.
It also seeks to expand the models of production and distribution that have arisen as social networks, hardware, generative software components, small-scale download practices and peer-to-peer protocols have changed the nature of not only how material is made but distributed. Mediatopia will act as an incubator and working model for experimentation, inquiry, and cross-cultural collaboration within the framework of these overarching themes...

[CONTINUED]

MORE »

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


Hz #12

(0)

Hz
www.hz-journal.org

12 presents:

[ARTICLES]
Spectral Memories: the Aesthetics of the Phonographic Recording
by Dugal McKinnon
Sonic artist/Composer Dugal McKinnon examines the aesthetics of the phonographic recording: "how is the record, as a technology with a well-documented history, also a signifying medium that has generated certain meanings, and modes of aesthetic production and reception?"

Augmentology Extracts
by Mez Breeze
Futurist and cyber poet Mez Breeze explores concepts that shape and are shaped by an extensive range of online/synthetic encounters through the phenomena Reality Mixing, Game Addiction and Avatar Formation. Three extracts from augmentology.com

Sound Art and Public Auditory Awareness
by Ariel Bustamante
Ariel Bustamante explores the connection between Sound Art and public auditory sensibilities by reviewing works by Max Neuhaus, Sam Auinger and Bruce Odland, Christina Kubisch, and Scout Arford and Randy Yau.

Second Lives, Virtual Identities and Fragging
by Matthew Board
"The use of the virtual identity, whether through Second Life, the persona of the hacker or an online identity gives the digital artist the freedom to explore creative strategies that would otherwise be much more difficult to realize. " Matthew Board investigates online art practice.

YMYI - You Move You Interact
by Joao Martinho Moura and Jorge Sousa
"YMYI (You Move You Interact) is an interactive installation, where one is supposed to build up a body language dialogue with an artificial system so as to effectively achieve a synchronized performance between the real user's body and the virtual object itself."

Pixelgrain
by John Grande
Writer John Grande's essay on "Pixelgrain" project by the artists Michael Alstad and Leah Lazariuk, an online repository of documents and ideas linked to the fading symbol of the Canadian prairie grain elevator.
[NET ART]
Spamology
by Irad Lee
Self-Portrait
by Ethan Ham

All The News
by Jody Zellen ...

MORE »

Originally posted on Rhizome.org Announcements by Rhizome


sunrise(untitledscroll#2) (2007) by Chris Collins

(0)

MORE »

sunrise(untitledscroll#2) (2007) by Chris Collins

Originally posted on del.icio.us/marisaolson by marisaolson


The Spirit of Recession speech by Paul Chan

(0)

The Spirit of Recession speech by Paul Chan

MORE »

Recorded at the New School on April 30, 2008, this passionate speech by artist Paul Chan describes the powerful events which hold sway over our time -- recession, war, and a banking scandal -- and their influence on human agency. Towards the end of the talk, Chan urgently underscores the importance of creative expression, as a means to endure and convey the negative consequences of capitalism.

Originally posted on del.icio.us/lauren_cornell by lauren_cornell


Cowboyana Trailer

(0)

MORE »


This is the trailer for a new video game by artist Mark Essen. Beginning July 15th, "Cowboyana" will be available for download from Essen's site.

Originally posted on messhof games blog by Rhizome