THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP (2007) - Billy Rennekamp

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THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP
THIS IS NEVER GOING TO STOP

LAUNCH

More work by Billy Rennekamp

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I Am Not Your Friend (2005) by Donnachie + Simionato

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"Intended as a critical approach to the social-networking systems popular in these years. We are still working on it, for the moment: I am not your friend"

More work by Donnachie + Simionato

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Last Breath in Alaska (Found Object) (2008) by Pascual Sisto

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In this work by Pascual Sisto, a plastic bag obstructs the Google Maps Street View of Minnie Street in Fairbanks, Alaska. Discovered while researching Google Maps Street View, Sisto preserves this "found object" by redirecting it to its own url, lastbreathinalaska.com, as well as capturing it as a back-up video, in case Google decides to reshoot the location. Swirling on a constant panoramic loop, the movement of the camera gives the abstract image an almost 3D-like quality. The piece documents Google's fraught attempt to supply an accurate representation of Minnie Street, and, as such, Sisto sees Last Breath in Alaska (Found Object) as a response to the purportedly omniscient eye of the Street View feature, and the issues of transparency and privacy it raises. - Ceci Moss

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An Object at Rest, Must Stay At Rest by Michael Guidetti (2007)

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Video Projection & ink on paper

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Let It Spin

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Imagine an art collective whose practice--on the surface--revolves largely around inside jokes, self-congratulation, and the unabashed display of consumption. Throw in a fine balance between fearless experimentation with form and a general disregard for traditional aesthetics. Sounds like international biennale material, right? In fact, it's "Double Happiness," the net art collective who today celebrate their first anniversary of online rabble-rousing under the moniker of this popular Chinese calligraph. When the group was invited, via email, to ruminate on this auspicious occasion, "Dub Hap" co-founder Borna Sammak replied, "I've noticed that those outside the art community seem much quicker to 'get it' than art people." Then again, he also boasted, "I pride myself in having the worst website on the internet." Indeed, the group's site--also managed by artists Eric Laska, Evan Roth, Jeff Sisson, and Bennett Williamson--is chock-a-block with the fruits of inordinately long websurfing sessions: frayed gif mashups, hilarious if sometimes unnerving audio loops, shameless resizes calling for inconsistent page widths, ekphrastic word/image paradoxes, and very often beautiful collages of similar images (graffiti tags, gummi bears, umbrella hats... Google Image Searches are their friend) that not only signify through combination and quantity but overwhelm the viewer with a sheer cascade of visual awesomeness. In many ways, the blog recalls the motto of OG net artists Jimpunk and Abe Linkoln's classic site, Screenfull.net, "We crash your browser with content." Double Happiness has the fresh spirit of a sketchbook alit--a sort of exquisite corpse in which no age or end is predeterminate of today's chaotic link-dump. Ultimately, if Double Happiness revolves around an inside joke, then the joke is shared by all of us. As Williamson reasons, "I enjoy using the internet as a medium for dubhap because online we already view so many disparate ...

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