Dying Gauls (2007) - Sophie Ernst

(0)

DG1.jpg    DG2.jpg



The Dying Gauls are plaster casts of Hellenistic sculptures on which video interviews of young men from Lahore are superimposed. The men are asked about their view of heaven, hell, death and dying.

The casts used here are Dying Gauls. The Dying Gauls were commissioned in commemoration of the victory of the Greek over the Galatians, Celts from Asia Minor. They are part of a larger group of defeated enemies made up of Gauls, Amazons, giants and Persians. Unique in the representations of these Greek enemies is that they are depicted without a triumphing victor.They are seen as defeated but heroic warriors.

-- DESCRIPTION FROM ARTIST'S PRESS RELEASE

Via VVORK

MORE »


Interview with Nicoline van Harskamp

(0)

nvh-2_1final.jpg
Nicoline van Harskamp, Any Other Business (Stage) (Photograph by Willem Sluyterman van Loo)

On June 18th at 7pm, artist Nicoline van Harskamp will present for the first time in the U.S. her performance work Expressive Power Series Part 1: Max Bonner on the Phenomenology of Speech at the New Museum, an event part of Rhizome’s New Silent Series. Her practice investigates the political implications of language and speech, and her pieces often take the form of performance. Van Harskamp took some time to answer a few questions regarding her upcoming Expressive Power Series Part 1: Max Bonner on the Phenomenology of Speech.

What of your other projects and/or research may have laid the groundwork for Expressive Power Series Part 1?

The performance takes as its basis the script for Any Other Business, a 6-hour performance that I made last year, set in a conference center in Amsterdam. I wanted to bring out the central thesis of that work, to summarize it down to an hour in a way. So, for Expressive Power Series Part 1, I took four of its most contradictory and most outspoken characters and planted them in a seminar room of an art center. During the 6-hour Any Other Business piece, the characters never get to speak to each other, but are merely juxtaposed. In the new piece, I wanted them to confront each other directly. And when writing their new lines, they started to say things they didn’t say before.

Things that I learned or heard since last year; things that I am working on for new pieces; things that I was thinking about a long time ago and that suddenly seemed relevant again. They ended up summarizing my own thinking at the moment, in a way representing the voices in my ...

MORE »


Post-Cursor: Talking with Eric Fleischauer from Bad At Sports

(0)


Nicholas O'Brien has produced another killer interview for Bad At Sports. (We posted his previous one, A Conversation with Jon Rafman a few weeks back.) This time, he speaks with artist Eric Fleischauer about his work and his current exhibition "Post-Cursor" at Chicago's threewalls. Fleischauer is keenly interested in the process of obsolescence in recording technology, and its importance for storage and archives. It seems fitting then, that the entire interview is recorded on videotape.

MORE »


Interviews from netpioneers 1.0

(0)

The following interviews were sourced from netpioneers 1.0, a research initiative active from 2007 to 2009 that was devoted to early net-based art, organized by the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Media.Art.Research. in Linz, Austria. All the interviews were conducted by Dr. Dieter Daniels.

Interview with Wolfgang Staehle

Interview with Helmut Mark

Interview with Robert Adrian X

Interview with Konrad Becker

MORE »


A Conversation with Jon Rafman from Bad At Sports

(0)


In this brilliant (and hilarious, and at times, NSFW) clip, Nicholas O'Brien interviews artist Jon Rafman about his work in Second Life for Chicago-based contemporary art blog Bad at Sports. Rafman uses his avatar Kool-Aid Man throughout, of his Kool-Aid Man in Second Life (.com).

MORE »


Performing Participation

(0)

automatic.jpg
MTAA, Automatic for the People ( ) Voting Kiosk, 2008 (Photo: M.River)

In the fall of 2008, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art invited several artists to create a new work for the exhibition "Art of Participation: 1950 to Now." One such invitation was extended to MTAA, a Brooklyn-based duo comprised of Mike Sarff and Tim Whidden, alternately known as M.River & T.Whid Art Associates. In response, MTAA constructed a poll-based project entitled Automatic for the People ( ), which asked the audience to vote upon the parameters for a theatrical performance executed at the conclusion of the exhibition (the title’s empty parentheses refer to an undetermined subtitle). Technically, the voting consisted of ten different electronic ballots addressing such creative and procedural elements as duration, space, and props, with each being accessible for one week at a museum kiosk and remotely online. All ten ballots contained ten options, and the most popular selections were incorporated into the live finale. During the summer of 2009, I enlisted MTAA in an email-based interview regarding the practical consequences and conceptual implications associated with producing their participatory poll and performance for SFMOMA.



automaticperf.jpg
Automatic for the People ( ) Performance
(Photo: Aimee Friberg; Courtesy of SFMOMA. )

DAVID DUNCAN: Let’s begin with the project’s finale. Can you give an overview of the performance— the staging, players and performers, costumes, and actions?

MIKE SARFF and TIM WHIDDEN: We began with the idea that the live work should come together as a unified whole; we felt that a series of unconnected actions would feel untrue to the vote process. We also wanted the audience to participate in the performance. To achieve this, we established three boundaries— installation, duration and action. For the installation we had a location outside the museum’s freight elevator that was selected by vote. The performance’s duration (the same length as the REM album Automatic for the People) was also selected by vote. The action involved two teams competing to create the best robot costume—again, an element determined by vote. Lastly, we included interruptions to the robot costume building competition. These we called interludes and digressions—they were essentially acts between acts that helped to pace the performance. The goal was to make it all seem solid even if an audience member did not know anything about the whole of the AFTP: ( ) voting process.

DAVID DUNCAN: Beyond the audience’s participation, did MTAA conceive AFTP: ( ) in cooperation with the SFMOMA staff?

MIKE SARFF: Yes, it was conceived for this space and institution. It would be good to note here that although the vote kiosk installation and ...

MORE »


Interview with David Toop

(1)

David Toop is the author of several landmark books about music, including Rap Attack (1984), Ocean of Sound (1995), and Haunted Weather (2004). He is also a musician, with a discography spanning nearly four decades. His first record - a collaboration with the sound sculptor Max Eastley titled New and Rediscovered Musical Instruments -- was released in 1975 on Brian Eno's Obscure label.

In Toop's previous books Ocean of Sound and Haunted Weather, he explored sound in all its ephemeral, enigmatic, amorphous connotations. His new book Sinister Resonance, out next month on Continuum, takes those explorations a step further, drawing a dense web of connections between sound and visual art. Toop begins the book with the concept that “sound is a haunting, a ghost, a presence whose location in space is ambiguous and whose existence in time is transitory.” To explore sound’s intangibility and mystery, Toop wanders through a bewildering array of references from fiction, myth, painting, and architecture, allowing him to approach sound in oblique and unexpected ways.

READ ON »


Interview with DIS

(1)

The art and design behind DIS Magazine is unlike any other fashion publication to date. Its contributors eschew the standard conventions of print publication to create an ever evolving series of related threads, organized around categories such as distaste, dystopia, discover, and dysmorphia. DIS is a collaborative project amongst artists, designers, stylists, writers and friends. They are Lauren Boyle, Solomon Chase, S. Adrian Massey III, Marco Roso, Patrik Sandberg, Nicholas Scholl, and David Toro, along with guest contributors that include artists such as Ryan Trecartin, Anna Lundh and Scott Hug. I recently conducted this Q&A via email with the members of DIS, in which they discuss the magazine's goals, its unique use of digital media technologies and the Web, and the future of the publication.

READ ON »


Andy Warhol's Fifteen Minutes (1986-1987)

(0)

Andy Warhol hosted the television show "Fifteen Minutes" on MTV from 1986-1987, making only five episodes. Four of the five episodes are available below, the videos and text are sourced from The Jailbreak and the videos were originally discovered via Zamboni Soundtracks.

(Note: For those who want to view more art television shows, Rhizome dedicated a day to art-related public access TV shows in December. To view the posts from that day, visit the December 2009 archive and scroll down to December 8, 2009.)


EPISODE 1 (1986): Robin Leach, Jerry Hall, John Oates, Dweezel and Moon Zappa, Tama Jamowitz, Paulina Porizkova, Sally Kirkland, Tracy Johns, Katherine Hamnett including fashion show with models Maria Kay, Anna Jonsson and Eric Perron, The Parachute Club, and The Pyramid Club with Happy Face, Lady Bunny, Dean Johnson, John Kelley as Dagmar Onasis and Lypsinka.



EPISODE 2 (ca. January 1987): Grace Jones, Kenny Scharf, Marc Jacobs including fashion show with models Charlotte Dawson, Pam Piper and Cynthia De Maria, Peter Beard, Kevin Dillon, John C. McGinley, Francesco Quinn, William Burroughs, Chris Stein, Angel Estrada including fashion show with models Lori Milligan and Rochelle Redfield, Elizabeth Peña, Gregory Abbott, Judd Nelson, Das Furlines, Isabel Toledo, Ruben Toledo, Suzie Zabrowska (fashion model for Isabel Toledo), Dovanna Pagowska (fashion model for Isabel Toledo), and Angelo Colon.



EPISODE 3 (ca. February 1987): Victor Love, Bobbi Humphrey, Wall to Wall (singing Tuff Luck), Ian McKellen, Bo Diddley, Moto-Fashion by Michael Schmidt and Anita Martire Schmidt models: Grace Nemergut, Raphael and Thomas H. Street, Martire models: Ralph Scibelli and Barb Carboy, Motorcycles: Pilar Limosner, Sally Randall, Hugh Mackie, Dimitri Turin and Willard, The Fleshtones, Saqqara Dogs with Ruby Ray and Bond Bergland, The Tunnel nightclub with Rudolf (club director), Thomas Leeser (co-owner) and Carla Steiner (bartender & singer), Regina Beukes (violinist), Miriam ...

MORE »


XLR8R TV Episode 13: Detroit Ghettotech

(0)

MORE »