Eli Keszler's Piano Wire Works

(0)

eli keszler : cold pin from eli keszler on Vimeo.

New York-based musician and artist Eli Keszler integrates piano wire into his compositions in a way that falls between installation and improvisation. For Cold Pin, motorized beaters controlled by a generative sequence struct 14 piano strings hung across the wall of Boston's Cyclorama in 2011. Keszler then invited Ashley Paul, Greg Kelley, Reuben Son and Benjamin Nelson to play off the work, improvising alongside the randomized clunks, scraps, and bangs emanating from the wall.

His recent L-Carrier at Eyebeam complicated this format by activating the motors in tandem with a changing visual score designed by Keszler. Hosted on a dedicated website commissioned by Turbulence, these images evolved when visitors tripped up "targets" on the site that interfere with the code, modifying the pattern of the motors. On June 7, Keszler again played in a seven piece ensemble in conjunction with the installation, including musicians Ashley Paul, Anthony Coleman, Alex Waterman, C Spencer Yeh, Catherine Lamb, Geoff Mullen, and Reuben Son.

In both compositions accompanying Cold Pin and L-Carrier, the installation serves not as a simple backdrop, but a central element. On their own, the installations continue to have a commanding presence. Unlike the extended resonating tones of Ellen Fullman's Long Stringed Instrument, which meditatively fill a room, Keszler's approach to auditory space reveals his training as a percussionist, where the plucks are akin to hits - busy, feverish and complex. Taken out of an enclosed environment, such as in Collecting Basin, piano wire is not only responsive to the whims of the motor beaters but also the wind and the elements. Here, Keszler hung the wire from a large water tower, transforming an industrial space into an open air instrument.

Eli Keszler Collecting Basin from eli keszler on Vimeo ...

MORE »


How Large is an Atom of Music? A Tour through Today’s Spectral Music and Software at UCSD

(3)

Well, the short answer is .093 seconds. That’s about the shortest amount of time mathematicians need to generate a full analysis of a sound’s component frequencies.

On an even smaller scale, computers typically store sound information in 44100 samples per second. This makes up the typical waveform view of sound that most are accustomed to seeing. However, each sample only gives information about amplitude (or volume), which is a pale portrait of sound. Sound in the physical world is essentially an unfolding of waves over time. Therefore, when translating from physical to digital, frequency information over time is essential to give a meaningful atomic definition of any sound.

A waveform view plots time vs. amplitude. A spectrogram plots frequency vs. time with color representing amplitude

Armed with the calculus technique of the Fast Fourier transform, mathematicians typically take the amplitude values from a mere .093 seconds of sound and draw a complete audio portrait. This portrait consists of the volumes of each component frequency that makes up a complex sound.

Thus, the Fourier transform is the key tool for spectralists, a loosely related group of composers and scientists whose goal is to analyze and resynthesize sound using sound’s most basic digital elements. Spectralists literally rip apart sound into its tiniest grains and develop diverse strategies to reconfigure those microsounds into a new sound barely resembling its original form. Between the two poles of granular analysis and synthesis, musicians have only begun to chart a new world of expression.

READ ON »


Oramics (2011) - Nick Street

(0)

A brief glimpse of Daphne Oram's pioneering and unique Oramics synthesizer, designed in 1957 after she left the legendary BBC Radiophonic Workshop to pursue the project.

This short film features Dr Mick Grierson, Director of The Daphne Oram Collection, acquiring the synthesizer from a collector in 2009.

The machine is now in the hands of The Science Museum in London and is currently being restored.

Originally via /mediateletipos)))

LINK »


Rectangle & Rectangles (1984) - Réné Jodoin

(0)


This is a didactic film in disguise. A progression of brilliant geometric shapes bombard the screen to the insistent beat of drums. The filmmaker programmed a computer to coordinate a highly complex operation involving an electronic beam of light, color filters and a camera. This animation film, without words, is designed to expose the power of the cinematic medium, and to illustrate the abstract nature of time.

-- DESCRIPTION FROM THE NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA

Originally via DIAMOND VARIATIONS

LINK »


Aquarelles (1980) - Tom DeWitt, Vibeke Sorensen and Dean Winkler

(0)


Video by Tom DeWitt, Vibeke Sorensen and Dean Winkler. Music by Vibeke Sorensen.

Originally via Diamond Variations

LINK »


Niodrara (2010) - Sara Ludy

(1)


MORE »


Sibyl (2011) - Yoshi Sodeoka

(0)



NOTE: This is one of the pieces from an ongoing psychedelic/ambient video project.

This project (yet to be titled) was inspired by the idea of 70's progressive rock concept albums. It will consist of several short videos. Each piece will be autonomous, but when viewed together will create a larger whole. The final number of videos and the total lengths are yet to be determined; each video will be released as it is completed.

All videos will be directed and produced by Yoshi Sodeoka. Music will be composed by a collaborative effort of Yoshi Sodeoka and Daron Murphy.

-- FROM THE ARTIST'S DESCRIPTION

MORE »


A Melody (1984) - Walter Verdin

(4)

MORE »


"Electric Independence: Morton Subotnick" Video from Motherboard.tv

(0)

Motherboard.tv, for their series Electric Independence, visit the home of electronic music pioneer Morton Subotnik, who speaks about his career and work.

LINK »


Blue Mercury (1986) - Matthew Schlanger

(0)


Originally via VIDEO CIRCUITS

LINK »