Hey you with the Totally Awesome Face (2006) - Jeremy Bailey

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Rendered Spirits (2008) - Rick Silva

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Three Transitions (1973) - Peter Campus

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FREE getwell cards email a friend (2006) - Paper Rad

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olafur eliasson vs sprinkler lady (2008) - Zach Shipko

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Art Keeps On Slipping Into the Future

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vanderbeeksmall.jpg

Stan VanDerBeek (1927-1984) shares with artists like Josef Albers, Aldous Huxley, John Cage, Robert Rauschenberg, and Buckminster Fuller the legacy of having developed their practice at Black Mountain College, the creative mecca where these and other thinkers pushed the edges of visual art, music, literature, technology, and consciousness. His experimental films of the 1950s blurred dada collage and science fiction, and he was an early adopter of both analog processes and computer animation, establishing for him a godfather-like position in the origin-narratives surrounding new media. His often rough aesthetic anticipated glitch-fetishism by several decades and drove the surrealist aesthetic into new territory; yet this is not to say that his works didn't go down smoothly. (The internet is full of video evidence of his colorfully dreamy proliferations.) The artist is currently the subject of an exhibition at New York's Guild & Greyshkul gallery, where one can see VanDerBeek's contribution to the proto-history of digital copy-and-paste stylistics in the form of real copy-and-paste collages and his own reworkings of his early films. Much of the work in the show, including a "faux mural" he transmitted electronically to international venues, in 1970, was made in his days at MIT, where his immersion among scientists and engineers had a clear impact on his art. VanDerBeek had a futurist and almost cosmological approach to his work and was one of those artists known for spouting beautiful witticisms about finding universal modes of expression that transcended media and the confinement of traditional forms. At the end of the day, he also reminded us that "Art is the artifact of reality (not taken for granted)." - Marisa Olson

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waiting_lotus.gif (2008) - P. Doyle

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from http://nootnatdit.net/blog/

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My Favourite Landscape (2007) - Paul Destieu

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"My Favourite Landscape is made of 500 70 x 50 cm offset prints. It is a reappropriation of the well known Windows XP desktop : Green Hill. Taking advantage of the weakness of the computer, it sets the common bug out of its context, on a wall, expending it to a much bigger scale. The famous picture finds a new landscape shape out of its usual frame."

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Via Pascual Sisto

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9 Fans (Super Bowl XLI Kickoff) (2007) - Fernando Sanchez

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Giving 'Em the Old Razzle Dazzle

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There is an approach, within military strategy, known as "Razzle Dazzle." The idea is to stand out with such visual intensity so as to perplex your target. This might be a good point of comparison with the work of Meredyth Sparks, which addresses political issues by dialetically fusing stills from the halls of rock music history, a constructivist visual vocabulary, and bling...lots of bling! Her current show at New York's Elizabeth Dee gallery, entitled "We were strangers for too long," employs images and sculpture heavy on silver foil, vinyl, and glitter, as ammo in launching an argument about intersections of "radical chic" and the culture wars. Her digitally-processed collages layer not only images from the mid-1970s that she argues chart a rise in rebellion against conservative culture, but also splice together art historical references to perspectivalism, the history of photographic media, and modernism's love affair with the grid. Her work both pushes and critiques the ideology of loud, glam, in your face activism, looking particularly at how strains of punk rock became (either through their own design or by a process of co-opting) part of the capitalist system they sought to tear down, thus raising the question of how we might come to fight fire with fire by once again making protest hot. - Marisa Olson


Image credit: Meredyth Sparks, Kraftwerk III, 2008

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