Dogs in Space

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Image: yourethemannowdog.com (Screengrab)

Combine a gif of an irate Sean Connery, an audio loop of his comment "You're the Man Now, Dog" from the film Finding Forrester, and bold, zooming text of the same statement and you have the simple recipe behind the popular internet meme http://www.yourethemannowdog.com/. Created by Max Goldberg, the site became a sensation in the early 2000's, and it soon lead to numerous spoofs. Goldberg began mirroring the sites in an effort to keep track of these rudimentary creations, and, eventually overwhelmed by the quantity of spin-offs, Goldberg developed a platform for YTMNDs, http://ytmnd.com/. For the current exhibition "YTMND" at Dallas gallery And/Or, Paul Slocum and Guthrie Lonergan have assembled some of their favorite YTMNDs and installed them on monitors placed in metal shelving units. A short essay "Picture. Sound. Text." by Lonergan on the significance of the genre's unapologetically lowbrow humor accompanies the show. Lonergan argues that the YTMNDs embrace and celebrate the reality that the "Internet turns culture into small pieces of shit." Regardless of one's opinion on the role of the Internet in the advancement of shittiness, the YTMNDs culled by Lonergan and Slocum are funny, weird, random, surreal and unquestionably entertaining, proving that YTMNDs bring something to the table.

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Image: Installation of the "YTMND" Exhibtiion at And/Or

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Image: holy crap, a meteor!!! (from "YTMND")

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Image: The sky lounge (from "YTMND")

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YouThreebe (2007) - Jeff Crouse

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YouThreebe is a tool that allows users to make triptychs out of YouTube videos.

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HTTQTP// (2009) - Michelle Ceja

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ESTRELLA (2009) - Micaela Durand

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the age of aquarius (2012) - Anne de Vries

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waves from the web re-photographed as a multi media ocean.

-- FROM ARTIST'S WEBSITE

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Rhizome's "The Long Gallery" at Why + Wherefore

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Rhizome's Curatorial Fellow Brian Droitcour organized an online exhibition, which went live last night, for Why + Wherefore's series "7 x 7." Titled "The Long Gallery" the show brings together works that horizontally exceed the standard-sized frame of the browser. Artists include Justin Kemp, Christy Matson, Brenna Murphy, Bennett Williamson, Petra Cortright, Peter Baldes, and Daniel Eatock. The show is the sixth installment of seven separate online exhibitions curated by seven websites with seven works each. (Whew! So many 7s.) Apparently it was a pain to code too, sorry W+W!

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Monster (2009) - Pascual Sisto

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POOR TRAITS (2009) - Petra Cortright

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Pixel Celebration (2009) - Parker Ito

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Art From the Middle of Nowhere

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Image: Paul D. Miller, NORTH/SOUTH (loop), 2008

Paul D. Miller, the artist, remix theorist, and DJ parenthetically known as DJ Spooky, is among the latest flood of artists to take interest in Antarctica. Representing the world's highest, driest, and coldest desert, the often misunderstood continent lured some of the film medium's earliest documentarians who were in search of something new and continues to entice new media artists concerned about its disappearance. Those who are liberal in their use of the word "remix" might say that this long-contested territory is now being remixed. In a sad twist of irony, the continent with no permanent residents has fallen victim to the environmental effects of global human pollution. Paul Miller's work grows out of DJ culture and a love of music, but has in recent years been concerned with the evolving relationship between media and culture. In 2004 he remixed Birth of a Nation, D. W. Griffith's white supremacist feature film that nonetheless propelled cinema as an art form. In his new North/South installation, the artist responds to material ranging from filmic narratives about polar expeditions to John Cage's Imaginary Landscape #1 (1938)--which he cites as the first-ever turntable composition--to tell his own story about Antarctica. The work exhibited is presented as an acoustic interpretation of the continent's place in international politics, and the "Great Game" of national interests as states claim territory and define their identity. A timely topic, considering Russia planted a flag in the North Pole's seabed to claim the natural resources underneath it. The show opens tonight at New York's Robert Miller Gallery. - Marisa Olson

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