Chromedrones (2009) - Aaron Meyers

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Chromedrones is a sound toy in your web browser. You can create sound-resonating attractor pop-up windows by pressing the 'a' key. The particles from the main window will feed the attractors energy that allow them to produce sound.

-- FROM CHROMEDRONES ENTRY ON CHROME EXPERIMENTS

Note: It is advised to use headphones.

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ASCIImeo (2010) - Peter Nitsch

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Yoshi Sodeoka's Psychedelic Death Vomit (2008) run through ASCIImeo

Developed by Peter Nitsch, ASCIImeo renders Vimeo videos into ASCII text.

Originally via Today and Tomorrow

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SNOWSTORM (2010) - Mark Beasley

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"Something Wrong is Nothing Wrong: Jodi.org" on Motherboard.tv

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In this clip, Motherboard.tv speak with Joan Heemskerk and Dirk Paesmans of the legendary Jodi about several of their works, focusing on their playfully chaotic approach toward technology.

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Computer Art History

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"Fire Organ was a program I discovered in the early '80s working at my father's computer store in Andover, MA (OnLine Computers, 2 Elm Sq. right across the the street from the library). At the time, I didn't realize that Fire Organ was actually a demo disk for a language called CEEMAC developed by Brooke Boering. I just enjoyed the seemingly endless permutations of the scores as they'd cycle through on the old Franklin Ace's or the Apple IIc's we had on display. I also thought it was cool that some of the music I had just started to get into (e.g. Pink Floyd) was mentioned in the liner notes as motivations for some of the scores. These were the forefathers of the visualizations made so popular by Winamp and other current audio players."

-- FROM DESCRIPTION OF CEEMAC AND FIRE ORGAN BY DAMIEN CYMBAL



Other CEEMAC Resources
Damien Cymbal's Fire Organ and CEEMAC Resource
A structured graphics language: Ceemac. - Ed Jackson. (Creative Computing, 1983)
Javascript Fire Organ Emulator by Moonmilk

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Shake (2009) - Andrey Yazev

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Note: Works best in Safari

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Cory Arcangel on Motherboard TV

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Artist Cory Arcangel was recently interviewed by Motherboard TV. The short clip walks through many of his most well known projects, like Super Mario Clouds (2002) and Drei Klavierstücke op. 11 (2009), with additional commentary by Arcangel.

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Required Reading

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Mark Wilson, csq3422, 2008 (archival ink jet on rag paper, 61 x 61 cm, 24 x 24 in)

Julie Karabenick: Early in your career you made paintings and drawings. Now for almost 30 years you've used computers in making your art.

Mark Wilson: When I started using computers in 1980, very few artists were using them. To me, these machines were totally cool and exciting. Back then, there was little software of interest to an artist like myself. To make art with computers, you had to invent new working procedures. I bought a personal computer and learned to write my own software. I was trying to find a unique way of using the computer and software to create geometric images.

After developing some programming skills, the methodology of writing software to create images became utterly natural.

-- EXCERPT FROM "AN INTERVIEW WITH ARTIST MARK WILSON" BY JULIE KARABENICK ON GEOFORM

(Via Plog)

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Pandoras Box (2008) - Michael Flückiger

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Interview with Ele Carpenter

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Image: Open Source Embroidery Window Display at the Museum of Craft and Folk Art
(Photo credit: Travis Meinolf)

The exhibition “Open Source Embroidery” opens tonight at the Museum of Craft and Folk Art in San Francisco and it will be on view until January 24, 2010. The show is part of an ongoing project, initiated by Ele Carpenter in 2005, which examines how both embroidery and code can be used as tools in participatory, open source production and distribution models. “Open Source Embroidery” brings together artists, crafters, and programmers to explore this topic in the form of workshops and exhibitions. I spoke to curator Ele Carpenter further about the evolution and multiple realizations of the Open Source Embroidery project. - Ceci Moss

How did your larger research into socially engaged art and new media art evolve into Open Source Embroidery?

Socially engaged art and new media art practices share the language and concepts of social networks, participation and collaboration but they also have distinct histories and operate within very different social spheres. In the world of media arts people have been excited about the potential of the internet to be used to connect communities of interest for a long time. But new media didn’t invent participation; people who work with social networks on the ground already knew how much time and genuine involvement is needed to facilitate meaningful interaction. New media seems to have pulled ‘participation’ into the culture of ‘cool’ technology. But the most radical impact is the politicized culture of digital media testing the legal and ethical frameworks of production and distribution.

I was looking for a way to make tangible some of these ideas: to make visible older forms of collaborative production such as patchwork, and newer collaborative projects such as open source software. I wanted to ...

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